Ref No

D8760

Gell family of Hopton Hall

The contents of D8760 can be broadly summarised as follows:


D8760/E Estate material, consisting only of one map for Maynel Langley, late 18th century and documents for the London properties of the Porden family, 1794-1863

D8760/F Family records of the extended Franklin family and the later Gell family, 19th-20th centuries. The family records are sub-divided as follows:


D8760/F/FBO The Booth family of Lincolnshire

D8760/F/FEG Eleanor Isabella Franklin later Gell (1824-1860), only daughter of Sir John Franklin

D8760/F/FEP Eleanor Anne Porden (1795-1825), first wife of...

1714-1994

D8760/E

Estate records of the Gell family of Hopton Hall

 

1794-1863

D8760/E/D

Derbyshire estate records of the Gell family of Hopton Hall

 

[late 18th cent]

D8760/E/D/1

Maps of the Derbyshire estates of the Gell family of Hopton Hall

 

[late 18th cent]

D8760/E/D/1/1

Map of Gell estates at Meynell Langley

Lands of Dr Gell coloured in red, field numbers, some field names, names of other landowners/users. Woodland and stream marked. Main road, Ashbourne - Derby shown

Paper with linen backing, size 36cm x 24 cm

[late 18th cent]

D8760/E/L

Records of the London estate originally of the Porden family

 

1794-1863

D8760/E/L/1

Estate records of leasehold properties in London

 

1794-1863

D8760/E/L/1/1

Documents relating to Porden properties in the parish of St Marylebone, London

 

1794-1863

D8760/E/L/1/1/1

Agreement between William Porden and Messrs John Sawyer to erect a house in Upper Berkeley Street, parish of St Marylebone, London

Draft articles of agreement between William Porden of Devonshire Place, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, architect, and John and John Sawyer of George Street, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, carpenters, for the erection of a capital brick messuage on land demised by Peter William Baker fronting north on Upper Berkeley Street in the parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, and the lease of the premises to Messrs Sawyer, to be held for a term of 77 years (wanting 10 days) from 25 December 1795 at the annual rent of £8 (except for a peppercorn rent for the first year and a quarter) and a...

6 Nov 1794

D8760/E/L/1/1/2

Lease by Peter William Baker to William Porden of a piece of land in Upper Berkeley Street, parish of St Marylebone, London

Indenture of lease by Peter William Baker of Rawston, Dorset, esquire, to William Porden of Devonshire Place, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, architect, of a piece of land fronting north on Upper Berkeley Street in the parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, to be held for a term of 82 years and a quarter from 25 December 1789 at the annual rent of £8 (except for a peppercorn rent for the first year and a quarter) and a further annual rent of £50 should Porden allow the premises to be inhabited; including plan showing dimensions.

Endorsed with registration 28 June 1794

25 Feb 1794

D8760/E/L/1/1/3

Lease by Francis Bedford and another to William Pearman of No. 13 Castle Street, Oxford Street, London

Indenture of counterpart lease by (1) Francis Bedford of Granville Square, Pentonville, Middlesex, esquire, and Henry Sellwood of Horncastle, Lincolnshire, esquire, (2) Sir John Franklin, now beyond the sea, knight, Captain in the Royal Navy, to (3) William Pearman of Castle Street, Oxford Street, Middlesex, music printer, of a messuage, No.13 on the north side of Castle Street, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, to be held for a term of 15 years and 3 quarters of a year (wanting 10 days) from 25 December 1846, at the annual rent of £80

14 Aug 1846

D8760/E/L/1/1/3/1-6

Legal correspondence and other papers of John Philip Gell on the expiry of the lease of No. 13 Castle Street, Oxford Street, London and the delivery of the premises to Robert Reid

Subject to a lease dated 10 April 1765, the estate of H.S. Cafe

Documents currently inside lease D8760/E/L/1/1/3

6 Mar 1862-28 Nov 1862

D8760/E/L/1/1/4

Schedule of the leasehold property of the late William Porden in the parish of St Marylebone, London, held in trust for Sir John Franklin and his daughter, the wife of Reverend John Philip Gell

Relating to 59 Berners Street (with stable), No. 13 Castle Street (with workshops) and 62-66 Berkeley Street; recording tenants, tenure, rent, dates of payments due, insurance firm, annual payments, ground rents, and remarks on nature of holdings and payments.

Undated, paper watermarked 1855

c1855

D8760/E/L/1/1/5

Agreement of the trustees of the marriage settlement of Reverend John Philip Gell with Francis Bowen to lease 62 Upper Berkeley Street, parish of St Marylebone, London

Agreement between (1) Reverend John Nassau Simpkinson of Brington, Northamptonshire and Reverend Arthur Wright of Willton, Lincolnshire, trustees under the marriage settlement of of Reverend John Philip Gell with Eleanor Isabella Franklin his late wife, and (2) Francis Bowen of 6 South Park, Ilford, Essex, medical doctor, for the lease of 62 Upper Berkeley Street, Portman Square, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, for a term of 10 years and a quarter from 29 September 1861 at the annual rent of £90

30 Sep 1861

D8760/E/L/1/1/5/1-2

Legal correspondence relating to the lease by Reverend John Philip Gell with Francis Bowen to lease 62 Upper Berkeley Street, parish of St Marylebone, London

 

4-9 Nov 1863

D8760/E/L/1/2

Deed of lease by William Porden to Messrs Sawyer of ground and house (No. 66) in Upper Berkeley Street, parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex

Counterpart lease by demise by (1) William Porden of Devonshire Street, parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, architect, to (2) John Sawyer the Elder and John Sawyer the Younger, both of George Street in the same parish and county, carpenters, of a parcel of ground and the brick messuage on it in the parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, fronting north on Upper Berkeley Street (further described), for a term of 77 years except for 21 days from 25 March 1795, at the rent of £8 per annum (except for the first year, which is a pepper corn rent).

Marked as "No. 66" in pencil

10 Oct 1795

D8760/E/L/1/3

Deed of lease by William Porden to John Bingley of ground and house (No. 64) in Upper Berkeley Street, parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex

Counterpart lease by demise by (1) William Porden of Berners Street, parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, architect, to (2) John Bingley of John Street, parish of St Pancras, Middlesex, mason, of a parcel of ground and the brick messuage on it in the parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, fronting north on Upper Berkeley Street (further described), for a term of 74 years except for 21 days from 25 March 1798, at the rent of £8 8s per annum.

Marked as "No. 64" in pencil

1 Mar 1799

D8760/E/L/1/4

Deed of lease by William Porden to Matthew Smith of ground and house (No. 65) in Upper Berkeley Street, parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex

Counterpart lease by demise by (1) William Porden of Berners Street, parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, architect, to (2) Matthew Smith of Jermyn Street, parish of St James, Westminster, Middlesex, bricklayer, of a parcel of ground and the brick messuage on it in the parish of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, fronting north on Upper Berkeley Street (further described), for a term of 74 years except for 21 days from 25 March 1798, at the rent of £8 8s per annum.

Marked as "No. 65" in pencil

2 Mar 1799

D8760/E/L/1/5

Deed of settlement by William Porden to Messrs Bedford and Bond of leasehold premises in Castle Street and Berners Street, London, for the benefit of Mr Porden, his wife and daughter Eleanor Anne

Indenture of bargain and sale between (1) William Porden of Berners Street, Middlesex, architect, (2) Eleanor Ann [sic] Porden, daughter of William Porden, and (3) Francis Bedford of Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, Middlesex, architect, and John Linnell Bond of Newman Street, Middlesex, architect; William Porden grants a house and land in Castle Street, and a house and land in Berners Street, both in the parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, to Messrs Bedford and Bond in trust to the use of Wiiliam Porden, his wife Mary and his daughter Eleanor Ann for the terms of the remaindeer of their...

11 Mar 1809

D8760/F

Family records of the extended Franklin family and the Gell family of Hopton Hall

 

1714-1994

D8760/F/FBO

Records of the Booth family of Lincolnshire, related to Sir John Franklin

The records consist of correspondence written to members of the Booth family which came into the possession of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, daughter of John Franklin and his first wife, Eleanor Anne (nee Porden). They passed to her descendants before being deposited in the Derbyshire Record Office.


Ther are letters written by members of the Booth family elsewhere in the Gell collection: -

7 letters by Hannah Booth to John Franklin, 1825-1837, at D8760/F/FSJ/1/7/1-7:

1 l letter from Hannah Booth to her sister-in-law Eleanor Anne Franklin, 1824, at D8760/F/FEP/1/6/1;

25 letters from Hannah...

1817-1838

D8760/F/FBO/1

Correspondence of the Booth family of Lincolnshire

 

1817-1838

D8760/F/FBO/1/1

Letters from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth

The 13 letters cover the period prior to Franklin's appointment to the North Pole expedition and his governorship of Van Diemen's Land.

1817-1838

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/1

Letter from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, prior to his appointment on the expedition to the North Pole

Thanks for sending poultry.  Has been interviewed by Lords of the Admiralty and expects to be appointed to an expedition.  Refers to individuals wanting him to be appointed.  Nature of his appointment not yet known. Expedition will journey toward the North Pole.  Needs to remain in London, so unable to visit Lincolnshire.  Recalls conversation about shirts too worn for Mr Booth, asks whether he could he have them.  Reports visit from Stephen and the boys: with references to John being asked to let William come down. Mentions seeing Cracoft and Jones.

20 Dec 1817

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/2

Letter from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, prior to his appointment on the expedition to the North Pole

Expecting news of officers' appointments early next month.  Describes work at Woolwich to reinforce the ships.  Appreciates friendship of Mr & Mrs Booth and their assistance with preparation of his clothes: discusses detailed requirements.  Hopes they enjoyed the ball yesterday.  Asks about Tom and sends a message for him.  Rumours of the expedition have appeared in newspapers, so they can now feel free to tell friends of his involvement: mentions Augustus and Mr Hunt.  Asks when Willingham will be married and expresses a hope to meet his wife.

27 Dec 1817

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/3

Letter from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, prior to the sailing of H.M.S. Trent on the expedition to the North Pole

She may have seen incorrect newspaper reports that they've already sailed.  Has received satisfactory orders but cannot divulge them.  Discusses what might represent success for the expedition and likely length of time needed.  Acknowledges interest and support within the country.  Contrasts absence of crowds now with large crowds seen at Deptford.  Lists personal visitors: Mr Flint, Augustus and Willingham.  Regrets his sisters live too far away to visit.  Will sail in three or four days time to Shetland or Leith.  Refers to newspaper report in the Courier of 9 Apr 1818 of James's...

18 Apr 1818

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/4

Letter from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, on his return to Britain after his first Arctic land expedition

Pleasure at his return to England. Departing from his practice of writing circular letter of general information. His movements waiting on interviews with Lord Bathurst and the Admiralty, otherwise he would be setting off for Lincolnshire immediately, with suggestions of possible arrangements when he does travel to meet him at Keal or Horncastle. Preparation for publication of a book will necessitate his being in London to consult scientific colleagues and visit libraries, with the writing of the book being regarded as him as almost as arduous as his travels, to be done only out a sense of...

10 Oct 1822

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/5

Letter from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, on the imminent departure of his second Arctic land expedition, including hopes on his wife's recovery

Letters from Mrs Booth and Mrs Kay are enabling him to embark full of hope for his wife's recovery.  Dr and Mrs Hooker are seeing him depart and will then, in London, give Mrs Booth an account of his departure.  Letter is signed "half past 9 o'clock" with an addition: "We sail at ten."

16 Feb 1825

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/6

Letter from John Franklin to his sister, possibly Hannah Booth, on his second Arctic land expedition, following the death of his first wife, Eleanor

Has prayed for his daughter on her birthday and feels confident of the care she wll be receiving.  Reflects on his thoughts and feelings following his wife's death; including evidence of her religious faith.  Asks to be sent details of what his wife said in her last days.  Describes journey from Fort William including use of smaller canoes. Weather favourable and journey further advanced than expected.  Describes likely next stage of the journey: he and Richardson to go forward by canoe to prepare provisions at each forward point.  Reports positive progress of transport of stores.  Refers...

2-3 Jun 1825

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/7

Letter from John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, on his second Arctic land expedition, following the death of his first wife, Eleanor

Agreement with her sentiments in her last letter. Comfort he derived from hearing about his wife's last days. Reassurance of Eleanor having told him Hannah was a good nurse. Comfort derived by his wife from talking with Mr Rawnsley on religous matters. Glad to have the current occupier taking care of the house for a year in spite of drawbacks in her manner. Reflections on the arrangements involving the Kay family in the household at the time of his wife's illness, with references to Mary Anne, William and Mr and Mrs Kay. Concerns over current state of household staff. Members of his party...

6 Feb 1826

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/8

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, while he is on Malta, on the marriage of John Richardson and Mary Booth, his opinions on members of the Kay family, and news of Lady Franklin's travels: with envelope

Happiness at hearing of the marriage of Hannah's daughter Mary to his friend John Richardson, being pleased to act as a trustee for the marriage settlement; reassurance to Hannah on the suitability of Richardson as a husband. Amusement at Mrs Kay only hearing of the marriage via New Brunswick given her meddling manner; her probably wishing for Richardson to marry one of her daughters or for Mary to marry Henry Kay, for which neither Franklin not Hannah would have given consent, based on his antipathy to most of the Kay family. Hopes that good matches can be found for Emily Sellwood and...

5 Apr 1833

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/9

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, prior to the journey to Tasmania

Confirms his affection for every family member.  She can be at ease as regards their health as the climate is supposed to be good and he hopes for an improvement in Jane's health.  Have engaged a governess for Eleanor.  Preparing for departure.  Describes the ship and its passengers.  Expects Isabella, Tom and Sophy to attend the departure from Portsmouth: will sail next month.  He and the doctor saw Mary Franklin and Mary Back.  Pleased to see that Mary was well enough to nurse her baby.  Hopes Mary Franklin will be happy in Van Diemen's Land: she will be medical superintendent of the...

17 Aug 1836

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/10

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, on stop at Cape Town on the journey to Tasmania

Arrived here a fortnight ago: whole party are well.  Mentions Sophy, Mary Franklin, Jane and Eleanor.  Many excursions made, including to Guedanthal [Genadendal], a Moravian settlement.  Envisages next part of the journey. Indicates letters sent by members of the party.  Reminded of his earlier visit to Cape Town.  Reports some anxiety about taking up his duties: asks for their prayers.  Fortunate to have an archdeacon and other clergymen as fellow passengers.  Enjoyed seeing Magellan Clouds through Herschel's telescope.  Asks for news to be given to Richardson that Dr A. Smith is returning...

28 Nov 1836

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/11

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, on his arrival in Tasmania and the reception from locals

Could not let the packet go without a line to Hannah. Landed in Van Diemen's Land on 6th January and was sworn in on the same day. Fully occupied since in gaining insight into his post and inspecting public offices. Tomorrow shall embark with Jane and party in tow, to Launceston and the Northern Districts, which will occupy 3 weeks or so. Gratified at his enthusiastic reception. Continues to receive flattery and congratulations from the community, and will be most happy and fortunate if it enables him to rise to their expectations. Slightly apprehensive to be governing such a previously...

29 Jan 1837

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/12

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, reporting on how the Franklin family are faring after the past year in Tasmania

Writing to inform the whole family through Hannah of his and his party's well-being. Mary Richardson had told John that Hannah's health had been restored. Mary [Franklin] has been proposed to by a man of good standing called Price, son of a baronet, whom they all like: John does not think the marriage wil take place soon. Sophy [Cracroft] is not well enough to get married in his opinion but is improving in manner and is an amiable girl. Daughter Eleanor is amicable and being well looked after by her governess, better than expected. Hearing from Mary Richardson, and sending fish specimens to...

21 Dec 1837

D8760/F/FBO/1/1/13

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his sister Hannah Booth, on the death of Henry Booth and assorted other family matters

Sad to hear of the sudden passing of Henry Booth. Thought that he would have outlived John but 'the appointments of God are inscrutible'. Hopes that his righteous existence will give comfort to those that lost him. Trusts that he has left Hannah's husband enough of his property to make them comfortable. Eleanor's health is good and her affectionate nature continues. Going on a short trip soon. Mention of his appointment of a Mr Evans but the Secretary of State had restored someone else to the post.

Postmarked 17 July 1838.

25 Feb 1838

D8760/F/FBO/1/2

Letters from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her aunt Hannah Booth

Written during the first two years of Eleanor's being in Tasmania, during her father's governorship of Van Diemen's Land (1837-1843)

1837-1838

D8760/F/FBO/1/2/1

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her aunt Hannah Booth, describing the Franklin family's journey out to Tasmania

She has received the letter from her aunt with great pleasure on her birthday. She describes their voyage which took four months and eleven days. They passed the time dancing, listening to lectures, and playing games of draughts and chess. They landed at the Cape and spent a fortnight there. During the voyage a man fell overboard, but was rescued, and on one occasion men went out in a boat to catch albatrosses, without success. They arrived at Hobart on 6th January; she describes Government House with its view of the harbour

20 Jun 1837

D8760/F/FBO/1/2/2

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her aunt Hannah Booth, giving her news of what has been happening in Tasmania, including on the engagement of Mary Franklin to John Price

She was very glad to get a note from her aunt. At the same time they heard of Henry Booth’s death, which shocked Sir John very much. She describes an accident in which Sir John’s cart overturned near Launceston, but he was not seriously hurt. Sir John and Lady Jane have been to Flinders Island; she describes the education of the natives [sic], and a performance they gave for Sir John and Lady Jane. Lady Jane gave some handkerchiefs and beads to the women and some jews harps to the men. There has been a ball for the officers of a French ship harboured at Hobart, but a storm prevented them...

13 Mar 1838

D8760/F/FBO/1/2/3

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her aunt Hannah Booth, on her education in Tasmania and news of the Walter family

She has been unable to write before as few vessels sail from Van Diemans Land to England in winter. She is glad to hear that they are all well and Aunt Betsy is no worse. She describes the books she is reading in English, French and Latin. She is studying Grammar, Geography, French, Music, Latin and Maths. She is also sewing doileys for Mary. She does not have a dance teacher but sometimes dances in the evening, and plays chess. She has a walk with Sir John from 8 -9 each morning. Mr Walter has bought some land on the banks of the Huon, which he has cleared to plant vegetables, and built...

8 Oct 1838

D8760/F/FBO/1/3

Letters from Lady Jane Franklin to her sister-in-law Hannah Booth

 

1831-1836

D8760/F/FBO/1/3/1

Letter from Jane Franklin to sister-in-law Hannah Booth, on Franklin's tour of duty in the Mediterranean and the hopes of getting the Cracroft family to move to southern France or Italy

Apologises for not writing sooner to send congratulations on the birth of Henrietta's baby boy. Notes that Hannah apparently knew about Sir John's arrival at Malta before she did, assumes the news appeared in a paper she did not see before his letter arrived; she had begun to feel uneasy when she did not hear from him, a letter he promised from Gibraltar had been delayed. This letter tells of various families who would receive Lady Jane if she travels to Gibraltar, and describes shipwrecked crews arriving there following violent gales in the Bay of Biscay. HMS Rainbow had partially struck...

8 Feb 1831

D8760/F/FBO/1/3/2

Letter from Jane Franklin to sister-in-law Hannah Booth, including concerns about the health of her husband prior to the Franklins travelling to Tasmania

She is sending a letter with Sir John and Catherine, but she cannot visit with them and will not let Eleanor do so. Eleanor is 12 years old, and thinks that at 14 she should be able to go to "all sorts of balls and parties and picnics" but Lady Jane disagrees. Writes at length about her concern for Sir John's health; she sleeps in the next room to him and hears him coughing at night. Disagrees with the way he is treating the illness, he should be drinking less wine, but he is unable to resist temptation. Would rather he were going on an Arctic expedition than to the governorship of Van...

3 Jun 1836

D8760/F/FBO/1/4

Letters from Emily Sellwood to her aunt Hannah Booth

 

1837

D8760/F/FBO/1/4/1

Letter from Emily Sellwood to her aunt Hannah Booth, reporting on letter received from Sophy Cracroft just after arrival of the Franklin party in Tasmania

She recounts the news she has received in a letter from Sophy Cracroft and asks that she tell Aunt Wright. The party had just returned from an excursion of a month. From Launceston about 8000 people came out about eleven miles to meet her uncle and he was welcomed in every place, with balls, dinners, suppers, luncheons and breakfasts. There were also illuminations and nothing like the enthusiasm occasioned by her brother’s arrival has been known in Van Diemen’s Land. On one occasion they sailed in a yacht for Flinders Island where the few remaining Aborigines are. They spent three days...

28 Jun 1837

D8760/F/FBO/1/5

Letters from Sir John Franklin to his brother-in-law John Booth

 

1835

D8760/F/FBO/1/5/1

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his brother-in-law John Booth, during the travels of Sir John and Lady Franklin in Ireland

Regret at not being in London when his letter arrived with regard to trying to help cousin George Booth get a position; Franklin would have written to the directors, of whom he knew only 3 personally, including Sir Felix Booth, whom Richardson knows better; any application will be need to be franked, otherwise it will be disregarded; Franklin happy to make personal application on return to London, unlikely to be before end of month; they are going with Captain Sabine tomorrow to the port of Valentia, considered the best location for terminus of rail road in western Ireland; if road ever...

3 Nov 1835

D8760/F/FEG

Records of Eleanor Isabella Gell nee Franklin, daughter of Sir John and Eleanor Franklin and wife of Reverend John Philip Gell

The records of Eleanor Isabella Gell passed to her husband, John Philip Gell, and were then handed down to their descendants until their deposit in the Derbyshire Record Office.

1828-[early 20th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/1

Correspondence of Eleanor Isabella Gell nee Franklin

The vast majority of letters are those written to Eleanor from when a child aged 4 years old in 1828 to the year before her death in 1860; the only letters written by Eleanor in this series are 10 letters (1832-1849) to her cousin Catherine Franklin, later Rawnsley, who gave them to John Philip Gell as mementos of his wife, and 2 letters to her aunt Elizabeth Franklin.

1828-1859

D8760/F/FEG/1/1

Letters from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin

John Franklin was frequently away from his daughter Eleanor as a consequence of his career as a naval officer. The first seven letters relate to the time when he was on a tour of duty in the Mediterranean in 1831-1833, during which time Eleanor was brought up with the family of Franklin's sister, Isabella Cracroft, with whom she seems to have remained even after Franklin's return to England. She became fully part of the family unit when they all travelled to Tasmania in 1836 when Franklin became Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land. He wrote to her in Hobrt during the times he was...

1831-1845

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/1

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with part of letter to her aunt Isabella Cracroft, on leaving Eleanor to be raised by her aunt while he is on duty in the Mediterranean

Letter to his daughter: on her good behaviour on parting from Lady Franklin and her understanding that she had to be left with her aunts and cousins instead of going to the Mediterranean; he hopes she will be affectionate to her aunt, who is kindly taking care of her, she must not be naughty, as her aunt will let him know, and she must pray for them and the family.

Part of letter to Bell [Isabella Cracroft]; he continues to like his little comfortable ship; his health is good and he hopes Jane's will be as well, as she ought to benefit from the climate in winter, provided she does not over...

24 Aug 1831

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/2

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his tour of duty in the Mediterran, including references to Eleanor's continued improvement in different areas, his wife's travels and the situation in Greece

He is pleased at the improvement in his daughter's letter writing. He has not heard from Mama for over two months, supposing her now to be in Smyrna or Constantinople. He is pleased at the marriage of her cousin Anne to Mr Kendall, whom he much esteems as a good Christian man. Her aunt and Dr Richardson tell him that she has grown, a sign of better health. Patras is more beautiful with the ripening corn, but the town is nearly deserted out of fear of attack by Greek troops who wish to drive away a chief who unjustly hold the place. He encourages her to study hard to learn French, which her...

16 Jun 1832

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/3

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his tour of duty in the Mediterranean, mainly on the travels of his wife

Her last letter was sent to Lady Franklin, so he cannot answer all the questions in it but she might. Lady Franklin has been to Alexandria, Cairo (not a pretty city) and the pyramids, of which she climbed the largest, albeit the last part was in a chair contrived for her and dargged by her guides; he had heard she and Owen [her maid] were at Jersualm on 24 May, and were to embark on ship from Acre for Constantinople via Cyprus, Rhodes and Smyrna; she will be visiting places sacred to Christians and they must read their Bibles to be familiar with the scens and places. Fanny Simpkinson has...

14 Jul 1832

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/4

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his tour of duty in the Mediterranean, mainly on the travels of his wife to ancient historic sites

Lady Franklin was unable to travel from Napoli di Romania to Patras because of robbers and lawless soldiers being in that country, so she went to Athens, famous as seat of ancient learning and for St Paul's preaching; Lady Franklin likely to return to Napoli and then meet up with him in Malta, where they will spend the winter, possibly in the society of Mrs Hanson and Miss Herring, Sophy Cracoft wil be visiting Lincolnshire which will be good for her health and where the society of her cousins will be amusing for her. He has not been far from Patras, only up the Gulf of Corinth to Vostizzia.

8 Nov 1832

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/5

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his tour of duty in the Mediterranean, including on the expected arrival of the young Greek king, Otto

He is pleased with her well-expressed letter. Lady Franklin left Patras for Zante, where the two of them parted, looking forward to excursions there and on other Ionian islands. He expects the arrival of King Otho shortly, and once he arrives, Franklin expects to be sent to Malta; King Otho is only aged 18 and will have three people called the Regency acting for him until the age of 21, before which time he will have to study, as will Eleanor. Lady Franklin not certain to return to England on the Rainbow, it being more likely she will return with Mrs Hanson and Miss Herring by way of Italy...

3 Jan 1833

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/6

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his tour of duty in the Mediterranean, including refernces to the travels of his wife

Details concerning postal arrangements. Lady Franklin remains in Greece, having sailed from Athens, and is likely to go to Smyrna or Alexandria. He is leaving Malta in a few days and will be glad to be at sea. Her cousin Frank Simpkinson is on the Britannia in the same station and her cousin Henry, a tall, nice young man, always enquires kindly after her. Franklin expects to be home before next Christmas and looks forward to embracing her and seeing her improved in knowledge and manner; he is glad she has not suffered from the illnesses of her aunts and cousins. He has not heard from...

24 Jun 1833

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/7

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his tour of duty in the Mediterranean, including references to his wife's dismissal of servant, his being presented to the King of Greece and his visit to ancient historic sites

He has not received a letter from her; she is to think what it is like not to receive one from him. He joined the Admiral at Napoli and found Owen and the manservant of Lady Franklin, who had left the neighbourhood with her companions only two days before his arrival; Owen had been unwell, or thought herself unwell, and the man had stayed to take care of her; Owen has behaved badly of late, and Lady Franklin has decided to part with her and send her home; Franklin wishes that she not be allowed to see Eleanor if she tries to. Lady Franklin is to have a Maltese maid sent to Zante and will...

19 Jul 1833

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Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on her 10th birthday, including reference to her earlier poor health and encoragement for her to think for herself

Notes her tenth birthday.  Enjoins her to be thankful and obedient to God.  Reminds her of her earlier helplessness and physical weakness.  There were fears that she would not survive, but now reason to hope that she will enjoy good health.  Deprived of her mother and placed in the care of Franklin's sister.  Applies a verse of scripture.  Regards her as having reached an age when she can reason for heself.  Hopes she will digest what she reads.  Refers to her mother's talents.  Urges her to practise the Christian faith.

3 Jun 1834

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/9

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, including references to their travelling to Brighton to help cure his wife's headaches

Neither he nor her Mama have heard from Eleanor or the Cracroft family for a long time. he was uneasy until he heard from Captain Saumarez that he had seen them all well a short time before. He hopes to hear she still like Guernsey, which is better for her and her cousins' health. He wants to hear what she thinks of the storms. He and her Mama are going to Hastings for a few weeks, as she has suffered from pains in the head caused partly by the smoky atmosphere in London. They will be going with Mrs Herring. Mama has not written, as writing causes pain in her head. Aunt Betsey is unwell...

10 Mar 1835

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Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his travels in Tasmania, with postcript at end from Lady Franklin

They were disappointed not to get a letter first post from Hobart from Eleanor, but found that Miss Williamson had not sent the letter on as it was so badly written and blotted; more pleased at the letter they had received since, showing more care; exhortation for Eleanor to add expression of duty as well as of affection at end of letters to them, as not putting it in showed haste and inconsiderateness in same way as bad writing and blotting. Sophy was going to write details of voyage, so she will more from her than he has time to write; glad to reach the River Tamar, as the voyage was so...

13 Feb 1837

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/11

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his travels in Tasmania

Journeying to Waterloo Point having stayed overnight at Mr Cotton's house. Includes references to the houses of Mr Bretton and Mr Parsons, by the latter of whom Eleanor's mamawas driven, as feeling unwell; arriving at Mr Cruttenden's at Prossers Place; Roper's Plains, a good place in which to cultivate grain, and the place Paradise; walking for 3 miles along the stony river bed of the Prosser River; his arrival at Spring Bay at Captain McLaine's; their departure from Spring Bay having been delayed, because of the loss of his wife's bag ; travelling 28 miles through uninteresting Bush...

29 Feb 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/12

Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his travels in Tasmania

He only has a few minutes to write while the party is packing to move to the next station; they are anxious to get the view from what is called the Fatigue Hill; the scenery around Lake St Clair is the the prettiest. Her Mama has not been free from headaches, but now much better than yesterday. He has heard Eleanor has been with Miss Williamson to Mr Barkers, and he hopes she can stay at New Norfolk as long as she can.

4 Apr 1842

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Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his travels in Tasmania

Written while travelling in Tasmania

He had written previously from the encampment at the base of the King William Mountain range, on the second day after their departure from Lake St Clair. Lady Jane wrote from the Eastern Bank of the Franklin river, and also when they were on board the Breeze. He was busy when the last two packets of letters were sent, but also thinks that Lady Jane’s letters will be fuller and more entertaining than his own. He writes about the discomfort of the journey, and rain and high winds, but was very much interested in the character of the scenery and especially...

[late Apr 1842]

D8760/F/FEG/1/1/13/a

Page of description of travels of Sir John Franklin in Tasmania

Including references to Mr Calder, Mr Milligan, Henry Elliot. There is no indication that this was written specifically for Eleanor Franklin but it relates to the expedition which took place in April 1842.


Before this only had the odd ache or pain to complain of whilst travelling in the wet season in the Bush; however, on this occasion, one of the men (Mumford) was struck in the face by a branch and suffered total loss of sight and great agony. He was almost at the end of his two years service on the track under the employ of Mr. Calder, when this travesty occurred. The night was so dark...

[late Apr 1842]

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Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his journey north on the last Arctic expedition, including reference to Eleanor's relationship with John Philip Gell

He rejoices that their journey starts on her birthday, another favourable omen he trusts. He has prayed to God for her and written to the person [John Philip Gell] dear to both him and her, which letters he sends with others to Lady Franklin, who wishes to see what he writes; he is sure Eleanor has the same desire to meet Lady Franklin's wishes; Eleanor's affection for her gives him comfort, and he is sure they will continue to seek each other's welfare; may God bless them both. He has many letters and dispatches to complete and send off to the Rattler while the wind is light. They are all...

3 Jun 1845

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Letter from Sir John Franklin to his daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during his journey north on the last Arctic expedition, being the last letter he wrote to her

Expects she and her mother have been thinking of him and his companions.  Describes divine services held that day, including details of the sermons.  Describes a visit to an eskimo station; their work of seal hunting, their appearance and clothing and their visit to his cabin.  Refers to the work of a Danish clergyman and of the carpenter currently in charge of the station.  Gives news about the extent of the sea ice.  Prays for God's blessing on the expedition.  Has asked her mother not to become anxious if they've not returned by the expected date; they have sufficient stores for a second...

6 Jul 1845

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Letters from Lady Jane Franklin (nee Griffin) to her stepdaughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

These letters were written from the period just before the marriage of Jane Griffin to John Franklin, which took place on 5 Nov 1828, until just after the marriage of Eleanor to John Philip Gell on 3 July 1849. The marriage effectively marked the end of any positive relationship between Lady Franklin and Eleanor; there were an estrangement between them almost immediately, caused initially by Eleanor's wish to have papers and effects of her father's which she felt belonged to her, and then by concerns over the proposed spending of her father's estate latter on search expeditions instigated...

1828-1849

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Letter from Jane Griffin to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, just before Jane's marriage to Sir John Franklin

Lady Franklin had brought a letter to her from Mrs Kay, and she thinks Eleanor would like one from herself now: she wishes Eleanor to think of her, as she loves Eleanor very much. : she hopes Eleanor will come to see her and Papa and that they will be happy together. She and her Papa have been a very long way across the sea on a ship: she sends Eleanor and Kitty [Catherine Cracroft], two pairs of shoes and two dolls, guessing she knows what the latter are made of. Love to Mama [Isabella Cracroft], Kitty and all the cousins: she asks when Tom might go to school

Sent while Sir John and Lady...

[Sep 1828]

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/2

Letter from Jane Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on impending visit to see Eleanor with her father, including possible reference to a zoo in London

Coming with Papa to see Eleanor; hoping to bring her home to London with them; promise of visit to large garden not far off, full of birds and beasts; love to cousins; hopes that Mama will also come to visit London; Aunt Betsy sends her love; hopes that Papa will give Eleanor many kisses from her step-mother.

Date 1829 marked at top in pencil; on the back a note [by Philip Lyttelton Gell] says that it was written shortly after Sir John's second marriage, 1828, when Eleanor was living with her Aunt, Mrs Cracroft.

[1829]

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Letter from Jane Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on being collected to go to see John and Jane Franklin

Gliddon has come to collect Eleanor; has written to Aunt Simpkinson to tell all her new cousins that Eleanor is coming; nice walk; love to family; Papa sends love and kisses to all

[1829]

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, while they are respectively in Cheltenham and Brighton

Eleanor has spent six weeks in Brighton, while Lady Franklin has been in Cheltenham; leaves now falling from trees, wind blowing, sea roaring, waves crashing, snow on ground but now melting; flannel overboots to walk in snow; why does the snow not settle on the sea?; bathing machines "laid up for the winter"; Aunt Cracroft always let them know about Eleanor; wants to know what Eleanor does, lessons, reading, etc.; wants Eleanor to get her Aunt to write to her as Eleanor is not old enough to write yet; Miss Herring has been to visit Eleanor; sends love from herself and Papa; and to Aunt and ...

[late 1829]

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on the possibility of Eleanor living with her and the Simpkinsons at Cheltenham

Received a long letter from Eleanor written with Sophy's help; wants another letter; Papa coming to see her; does she want to come back with Papa or stay with Aunt Cracroft longer before coming to Cheltenham to live with them and the Simpkinson family; description of Simpkinson cousins, Frank goes to Westminster School; has seen Mrs Hanson and Miss Herring and asked them about Eleanor; hopes she continues to be good; better to be good than pretty or tall; love and kisses from Mama and Papa; love to Aunt and cousins.

Marked "183?" at top in pencil.

[1830]

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, describing her travels in north Africa

Not easy to send a letter across the sea to England; Grandpapa coming to England in the steampacket and will bring a letter in a basket from Africa, bought at Tetuan, Morocco; description of market; jostled; description of clothing worn by locals, turbans, shawls, women's faces covered; visit to Governor, with Governor seated on throne, given tea and sweet cakes, interpreter Hadji Mahomed, had to give better gifts in return, description of gifts; sending oranges, and branches from Spain, plums from Portugal in the basket; waiting for the boat to Malta, hoping for a letter from Aunt; has had...

14 Oct 1831

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, while at Corfu during her travels in the Mediterranena, with note on back from Eleanor's aunt, Frances Majendie

Always receives a letter from Eleanor when steampacket arrives, queries whether Eleanor would remember without prompting; new arrangements for steampacket sailings, Eleanor should find out the details and act accordingly; not living on Rainbow because in port, large house on Esplanade; description of rock, lighthouse, signal-post, arrival of ships in harbour; calling ships "she"; Frank Simpkinson is to be a sailor on the Britannia at Portsmouth until Papa can place him on the Rainbow; cousin Henry Kay is on the Rainbow; Papa has written to Aunt, sends best love to Eleanor, and to nephews...

29 Jan 1832

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during her travels in the Mediterranean

In a hurry, sailing to Malta, going to Egypt, Asia Minor, Turkey and Greece; Papa ordered to sea two weeks ago, not allowed to go with him, will meet him in port; leaving Eleanor's letter for him for when he gets back; won't get so many letters from Lady Franklin but she will think of Eleanor whilst away; hopes Papa will write to Eleanor; Aunt Simpkinson will visit from Hastings; cousin Henry Kay in Corfu, not on board the Rainbow due to illness, now recovering, being her "aide-de-camp"; nicely written letter to Papa, hopes Eleanor will improve in everything, especially "goodness"; asks for...

3 Mar 1832

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, while at Malta during her travels in the Mediterranean, with added note at end from Sir John Franklin to his siater Isabella Cracroft

3 June. Evening of Eleanor's 9th birthday, toasting her and thinking of her, hoping that she can understand God's purpose and prepare for eternal life as grows older; not clear when Eleanor will see Papa again, depends when Admiralty recall him to England, might be October, Papa likes to keep his ship as long as possible, but greatest pleasure to see daughter again; would Eleanor and cousin like to come with Lady Franklin when Papa gets next ship?; must study in the meantime; Lady Franklin met an American family called Robertson in Athens, children have sent some gifts for Eleanor; wants...

3-8 Jun 1833

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, reporting on the travels of Sir John and Lady Franklin to Ireland, with part of letter addressed to her sister-in-law Isabella Cracroft

She has received Eleanor's long expected letter, which took its time arriving. They travelled from Dublin to Liverpool, arriving 1st Dec, travelled to Manchester by railroad at 20 miles an hour, and came to London by coach. Sir John is busy with the executorship of his uncle James's will before coming to fetch Eleanor to live with them at Bedford Place; they are likely to go to Brighton in Janaury for several months, with Miss Herring and invitations to cousins Catherine Franklin and Emily Sellwood; Catherine writes that WiIlingham likes natural history, and she hopes he will go to Rugby...

10 Dec 1835

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on Eleanor's leaving the Cracrofts to be at home with Sir John and Lady Franklin

Papa has come to collect Eleanor; when Eleanor comes back going to Dover with Emily and Catharine; talks about how Eleanor will miss her Aunt and cousins, but will be glad to come home; Emma Simpkinson will be at Dover; Marianne is at school, more obedient, God-fearing than before; Emma is generally a good little girl, for whom Eleanor can set a good example, being two years older; she does not know what books Eleanor and Kitty are reading, but she should leave one behind for Kitty; she has asked Aunt not to put any books in Eleanor's trunk; which will serve both; Eleanor will stay over...

7 Mar 1836

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during Sir John and Lady Franklin's travels in Tasmania

Written Sunday.They have been prevented from leaving due to the equinoctial gales, which makes it dangerous to go by sea; they will make another return route, part in boats, the rest by land, hopefully coming home Tuesday or Wednesday. Among things they have done, they have gone down a coal mine, bent double in mud and water, emerging with blackened hands and draggled petticoats. Love to the girls and Miss Williamson and little Emma, and love from Papa.

Paper watermarked 1834. This letter relates to a visit to Port Arthur which took place in Easter (late March) 1837, which ties in with the...

[Easter 1837]

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/13

Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during Lady Franklin's travels in Tasmania

Written Thursday. She writes that Sir John has had an accident in a cart with Mr Elliot, but is not hurt, only bruised and shaken. Meanwhile she has been on a trip herself to a signal station on Mount Junction half way down the Tamar to Launceston with Mr Gunn, but became benighted on their return and had to stay at a little inn (Colson's). A messenger sent on a message to Captain Maconochie for him not to be alarmed, but the messenger lost his way in the woods, as did the search party sent by the Captain, so that he did not hear of their safety until 2am. Both parties have just met up...

[1838]

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/14

Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during her travels in Tasmania

Moving down the Tamar, anchored near George Town, ready for the voyage to Port Phillip [Victoria. Australia]. Describes company and weather. Arrival of first war ship, the Polonius, seen in Launceston; hope that it will arrive in Sydney the same time they do: Mr Macarthur on baord, who will accompany Papa back by land to Hobarton; she joined him at Campbelltown; he laid stones for church as Longford and Morven. The Miss Walters were both seen, looking well. Upset at death of servant Somersett. Approval for Miss Williamson allowing Eleanor to go to Mrs Naylor's or Mrs Forsters, hoping...

30 Mar 1839

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on her travels on the Australia mainland

Writing on scraps of paper, cannot get any more, hopes Papa will have told Eleanor amusing and interesting things from her letters, although Eleanor cannot be told everything; at Sydney, tour with bishop whilst awaiting sailing of the "Medway"; in a pretty location, river, steep rocks and woods, cultivated gardens and cottages, orange and lemon trees; with bishop to locate site for clergyman's house, found a delapidated chapel, other chapels in the district; carriage carrying Sophy, Captain Moriarty and Mr Elliott hit a tree and wheel fell off, managed to fix it with ropes; Mrs Marshall...

21 Jun 1839

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Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, shortly after their return to England, including on Sir John's intention of publishing his account defending his period as Governor of Van Diemen's Land

She wants Eleanor to put forward Sir John's case with Mr Simpkinson (before the letter to Lord S. [Stanley] goes; if he does not think it right for Sir J. to announce at once his intention of publishing rather than stopping short with telling him not to send to Sir E. Wilmot; he will no doubt agree that the announcement should be made at the same time as the expression of dissatisfaction, but Eleanor may ask him whether it does not shut out all possibility of reconciliation with Lord S. and then put the case hypothetcially if Dr. Buckland should again try to interest Sir R. Peel on Sir John...

[mid 1844]

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/17

Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, including reference to Sir John Franklin thinking of going to find the North West Passage

Mr and Mrs Majendie went to Ryde with L. Herring and Mrs Watson today. The Archdeacon has applied for £3000 for the college, undertaking to get 5/6000 more. Willingham was engaged by her in the cause, but is not able to study, so has gone to Dr Hall: she was sorry Sophy went away without seeing Dr Hall. The Archdeacon has written a strong letter to Lord Stanley; she has spoken to various people about the situation in Van Dieman's land, but they do not wish it to be spoken about. Captain Maconochie continues to see Mr Stephen, who though cautious offers encouragement; Dr Richardson was there...

6 Dec 1844

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/18

Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, before Sir John Franklin leaves on his last expedition

She wishes to know what Mr Babbage's days are, not wanting Eleanor and Sir John go without her; she cannot give the real reason for her being away. Eleanor is to write a note to Miss Bowles to find out Miss Frankland's address and tell her it it is for Lady Jane who is at Brighton, also informing her of their new address; she is also to ask Miss Bowles whether it will absolutely be necessary to take Eleanor, which would entail expense and time; difficulties about her being presented, probably not until June; instructions are given about housekeeping matters, including on linen, wax candles...

[early 1845]

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/19

Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Franklin, including references to Emily Beaufort's and Eleanor's friendship with authoress Elizabeth Harris

She has 3 notes telling her the Bishop does not go until Saturday, Mrs Moore, wife of Lieutenant Moore in Plymouth has written to her saying she would like to name her new baby Franklin in addition to Rose. She has asked Lady Jane to be godmother, and she has agreed, provided she did not object to her views on the subject, which were that no absent peson could be the real sponsor of the child. Eleanor's aunt Fanny is disappointed in the encouragement she was hoping for in a letter from Major Beresford, who wrote a commonplace letter urging her to get up petitions against the Jews; Fanny...

[Jan 1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/2/20

Letter from Lady Franklin to her step-daughter Eleanor Isabella Gell, not long after Eleanor's marriage to John Philip Gell, including praise of Sophia Cracroft

Including on Eleanor acquiring a place Suffolk Place, better than Cecil Street, the worst she knows of it being the noise of carriages; her wish for the portrait of Sir John Franklin to take its place at Bedford Place, with the longer it being with Eleanor the less she will want to part with it; she will write to Aunt Simpkinson to send William or Charles for it; she wants to correct Eleanor's misunderstanding of her letter to Mr Gell about her response to people's expressions of sympathy and reactions to Lady Franklin's private expedition, and the "glowing words" she finds in her letters...

4 Jul [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/3

Letters from John Philip Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell

These letters were all written during his brief absences from her after their marriage in 1849.

1850-1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/3/1

Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, criticising the repressive nature of his father [Reverend Philip Gell]

JP Gell comments on his father, criticising his repression and ‘’putting hard interputations on natural emotions.’’ He compares his father’s negative methods with those of his Saviour. He feels he has been a breakwater for his brothers and sisters, by which he has endured his father’s temper and principles so that they could retain their individuality. He has read the beautiful article by Arthur Stanley, appreciated by Gurney, on the Gorham Case. He names some those who attended the meeting he has attended, chaired the Bishop of Peterborough, comprising Davies, the Queen's tutor, and Dr...

24 Jul 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/3/2

Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, on attending meetings of clergymen in Sussex, including reference to search expeditions and his doubting whether Sir John Franklin will be among those who survive

He writes that he will bring the Illustrated News home with him. He was disappointed that it had nothing of Austin’s tracks in it, only Penny’s which they know. He states how difficult it is to ‘’know whether to pray for dear Sir John or not’’ He has been thinking about him more and doesn’t think he will be among the last who survive, but cannot think him out of this world, with his moral power of mind making him stronger than younger men. He talks about plans for the day and his return to London on the following day and further plans for the rest of the week. He asks after and sends...

23 Sep 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/3/3

Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, on attending meetings of clergymen in Sussex

He is unable to return home for Monday when Lady Franklin may visit so he hopes that Frederick [his brother] will be able to support Eleanor instead. He talks about his morning ahead and how he enjoys the quiet there. He is staying with the Clarkes. They had a meeting at Storrington the previous day with Bradford, previously the chaplain at Vienna, in the chair. Lady Delazouch and the Curzons attended; news from Mr Curzon of the Emperor of China's conversion being reported in the Morning Herald. He has also mentions a circular that he has seen in every parsonage he has visited begging...

27 Sep 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/3/4

Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, including reference to a letter from Lady Franklin which is kind but essentially selfish, losing sympathy

He states that it was a kind letter from Lady Franklin but says that her grief has selfishness stamped on it, losing sympathy. He gives Eleanor instruction on what to write if ever gentlemen come on Mr Joshua Walker’s errand. He is to spend the evening with Lord Headly. He talks about his plans for the rest of the day, a walk to Petworth Park and a meeting at two. He quotes a Latin phrase and says how glad he is that Eleanor knows Latin. He writes further of plans and asks Eleanor to ask the Marstons to dine or arrange an interview with Marston on the Wednesday.

29 Sep 1851

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Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, quoting poem by Thomas Burbidge on Franklin's disappearance

He writes from home, about little Eleanor cutting her teeth and how he had meant to see Eleanor that morning but the coach did not come near the house but started from Ventnor when he had gone out with Gurney to look at a landslip. He has sketched the slip with three stages A, B and C which he goes on to describe. He is sending the Times which is full of the many awards for the Exhibition medals. He quotes a sonnet from a collection of poems ‘Hours and Days’ by Burbidge to console her. Burbidge had sent copies to Eleanor and Lady F. The sonnet is about the disappearance of Franklin...

16 Oct [1851]

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Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, during his stay in Dorset for meetings of clergymen: with envelope

He had a good meeting with quarrymen at Langton the previous night. ‘The rector is abroad, fled away from his curates who bully him, one an army doctor and the other a common doctor before they took orders. He is staying with a Mr Sewell who is ‘’ a model of a squire.’’ He asks what Macguire is like: he would like to know before he sees the Bishop of London whom he would like to involve in a plan of a general kind. Love to Marian. He is close to Branksea Castle where Colonel Waugh has set up residence.

Envelope postmarked for Maltravers Langton and Wareham 13 Oct 1857 and London 14 Oct 1857

13 Oct 1857

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Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, during his stay in Dorset for meetings of clergymen

He asks Eleanor to let Bolton know that Hansard is coming and that it would be prudent for him to have a sermon ready for Sunday evening. He talks of the people being of the right sort and the meetings going well. He has been invited to stay at Mr Mansell of Church Knowle’s parsonage next summer, close to the coast. He is bringing home two pieces of "coal money", for Eleanor and Franklin, found underground.

15 Oct 1857

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Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, during his stay in Dorset for meetings of clergymen: with envelope

He asks Eleanor to enclose a letter and resolution to old [?]Filleul. He would like to get an inkling on his son’s arrival in England on how the land lies. The weather has been beautiful. The meetings have gone well; he failed in getting to the boys’ school at Wimborne, but he has had a meeting every night and been very busy. He is concerned about Bolton and must make up his mind to get a second curate and look out for some suitable advancement for Bolton. He comments on how well the house he is staying at is kept. He sends his love to his family.Including on concerns at Bolton as curate...

17 Oct 1857

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Letter from John Philp Gell to his wife Eleanor Isabella Gell, during his stay in Dorset for meetings of clergymen

He has proposed to Dr Newman that he should take the church as a licensed room and be content with the curate attached to St John’s. JPG would not interfere and not be involved in any future arrangement which did not provide some equivalent for the money it would cost for the opening of the church. He believes Sir E. Parry fraternized with Macguire a good deal at one time. He asks Eleanor to let Miss [?]Sandry see the Kensington Place district visiting book. He is concerned about the nursery with the frequent colds. He is unable to reply to all the children’s letters. He supposes...

23 Oct 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/4

Letters to Eleanor Isabella Gell from her children

The letters consist of items sent by or for two of her seven children.

[c1855-1859]

D8760/F/FEG/1/4/1

Letter from John Franklin Gell through M.E. Gould to mother Eleanor Isabella Gell, largely written by his nanny

The letter is mostly written by M.E. Gould but includes a few lines from Master Franklin (the handwriting of a young child); he sends love to Mama, Papa, Eleanor and Baby. Letter is only dated 3 Nov.

[mid 1850s]

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Letter from John Franklin Gell to his mother Eleanor Isabella Gell, written when a young child

On having written a very bad Latin letter to Mama, his making a pair of purple cuffs for one of his sisters, playing at double chess, hearing a sermon from Mr Cheetham

19 Apr 1858

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Letter from Mary Frances Gell to her mother Eleanor Isabella Gell, written when a very young child

Written in pencil when a young child in slightly disorganised fashion; asks Mama if she likes Shiplake; Eleanor is guiding her hands a little; Miss Jay says she has been a very good girl; everybody is writing for dear Mama. PS; asks her to give her love to the little girl she is staying with. Endorsed "For dear Mama With Mary's love", in ink with for initial letters and pencil for the rest

21 Jun 1859

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Letters from father-in-law Reverend Philip Gell to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1846

D8760/F/FEG/1/5/1

Letter from Reverend Philip Gell to his future daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Including references to his son John Philip Gell

23 Jan 1846

D8760/F/FEG/1/6

Letters from mother-in-law Elizabeth Gell to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1849-1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/1

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, soon after Eleanor's marriage to John Philip Gell

Best wishes and prayers for Eleanor and John’s happiness; invitation from her brother Sim [brother-in-law Henry Sim], via Mr Griffin, for them to visit Wingham, Aunt Sim [Harriet] wants to know when to expect them; Harriet and Caroline have arrived safely at Clifton; Mr and Mrs Hayne going to Torquay for a week; weather has been cold and have had to light fires; Frederick thinks that Lady Franklin may not be going to America, but he cannot remember what exactly he heard; Frederick going to Tunbridge [Wells] to preach, father gone to Town to vote at Bible Society meeting about how to open...

11 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/2

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including on movements of search expedition ships and Elizabeth's travel arrangements

Has received a letter from Lady Franklin, wants her to tell her that Admiral Dundas says that “Stromboli” came back to Stromness on 21st, had left the “North Star” all well on 18th June off Cape Farewell; spending Monday night at Southborough as Mrs E Childers was leaving home that day, Tuesday night in London, and hopes to see Eleanor on Wednesday morning; hopes Eleanor had a safe journey and has comfortable accommodation; spending this evening with the Plumtrees at Wickham; Mr Hilton called on Eleanor and John after they had left; Mrs Ridout and her sister called and were sorry to miss...

29 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/3

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on death of Arthur Gell and on the finding of bottle with message from Franklin expedition

Very touched by Eleanor’s sympathy note, and calling her “mother”; had hoped that Arthur would return one day, God has decided that he should be taken from them, God’s name to be blessed, hope that will meet again in heaven; thankful that John is safe after “perils of various kinds”; anxious to know if there is any news about Eleanor’s father in the bottle found by Captain Paterson, a cutting from a Derby newspaper is attached and alludes to finding of a bottle containing documents from Sir John Franklin; questions about when Eleanor moving into her new home, furniture will mainly be new...

4 Oct 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/4

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on hopes about Sir John Franklin's survival following reports in newspapers

Rejoicing with Eleanor at the “gleam of hope” regarding Eleanor’s father, hoping that God will realise Eleanor’s wishes and that she is able to keep calm and happy “in this increased state of suspense”; Eleanor should trust in God; please thank John for sending them the details and the sketches of the ships, expecting that their newspaper will give more information and that the whalers coming back into port will bring new information; everyone interested in the news, something happy in their sadness, glad that Arthur is safe in heaven but sad that they will never see him again on earth...

8 Oct 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/5

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including on hopes of Sir John Franklin's survival: with envelope

Pleased and grateful to God to receive “testimonials” relating to John and the hoped for “important station”, trusting in a friend of “unerring wisdom and love” to obtain the result; hopes that Eleanor will have news of her father, asks when will “the vessels be ready to go?”; Elizabeth and Harriet wrote to tell Eleanor that family is moving to Duffield Bank, but not before Lady Day [25 March]; tenant leaving at Christmas, repairs to be done; John hopes to see them when they move, not coming to Derby via London but hope to see them in any case, can they come here for a long visit?, Mrs...

8 Dec 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/6

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including on Lady Franklin being seriously ill

Sending a remnant of chintz by her cousin, matches the hangings on one of Eleanor’s beds; not hopeful of seeing Baby, but not ruling it out, and should be very glad to see Eleanor or Baby; has heard from C. Cracroft about Lady Franklin being seriously ill and having received “cupping” treatment; hopes that she is being kept calm; begs Eleanor to soothe Lady Franklin as she is Lady Franklin’s “nearest friend”, thinks that Lady Franklin will appreciate Eleanor’s“filial feelings” and will also be happy to think about Baby, who is her husband’s grandchild; sorry to hear about Lady Simpkinson...

7 Mar 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/7

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, thanking her after her visit to Eleanor and her husband, before the birth of one of the Gells's children [Philip Lyttelton Gell]

Thanks to Eleanor and to John for kindness to her during her visit with them; sorry that she was not in better health, but it was God’s will; journey was 5 hours, Harriet met her at Derby station with the carriage; is tired but well; thinks about them all, and wishes she could be useful or a comfort to them; wishes that she had brought the “flannels” so that they could be made “here” and sent back to Eleanor, if Harriet can get a pattern she will send some “ready for the dear little visitor”; wants to know how much and when Baby should be fed, and whether he should be given “broth” or meat...

25 Mar 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/8

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on arrangements before birth of one of the Gells's children [Philip Lyttelton Gell]

Hoping that keeping as well as when last saw her and John’s back pain is gone; wishes that she would have a “proper nurse” with her for her “confinement”, would be better for the baby’s sake and also less anxiety for John, less “lifting and carrying” for him; happy to pay for such a person; wonders if Lizzy told her that a flannel dress had been cut out using Eleanor’s pattern and wonders if four will be sufficient; washing instructions come from a lady who has a large family but whose flannel dresses still stay “good colour and not thickened”; old Mr Borrowes of Clapham has died, Mr Gell...

6 Apr 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/9

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including on arrangements for visit of grandhildren while the Gells are in Lincolnshire: with envelope

Arrangements for grandchildren to visit, and for Eleanor and John to visit after their visit to Lincolnshire; thinks the children would have preferred to have both nurses with them but it is up to Eleanor to decide; sorry to hear that Eleanor’s cook has lost her baby, wishes that they could take her too, but hopes cook and husband will stay with Eleanor; had no idea that Isabella’s life was in danger, had heard from Mrs Jameson and knew that Isabella was still suffering, hope that Isabella will recover; pleased that Mr Godley’s arrival means that “something authentic” will be discovered...

18 Jun 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/10

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on correspondence on dispute between the Gells and Lady Franklin appearing in the press

Glad that Franklin is much better, should be carried to conserve his strength; glad to hear about the other children from their grandfather; apologises for starting at the wrong end of the writing paper; sympathises about “family affairs” being made public, letters in The Times, unfair that the “assailant should remain hid”” whilst John has been “dragged into the daylight”, philosophical about it though because truth will out and sure that it will not harm John’s reputation; sending bill back as requested, Franklin’s expenses came to £10 and 6 shillings, wants Eleanor to accept a £10 note...

12 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/11

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the dispute about the wearing of mourning following the Admiralty decision to regard the members of Franklin's expedition as dead from 31 March

Delayed writing because has had ear-ache and a sore throat, etc.; hopes that Eleanor is now well; must be trying for Eleanor that Lady Franklin “still keeps aloof”, argument about the correct time for putting on mourning dress, thinks it should be at the time of the Admiralty decision and thinks that the families of the lost crews will “act accordingly”, Lady Franklin wants to wait until Autumn, wonders whether Eleanor should agree to wait until the Autumn as well otherwise it would look as if Eleanor and Lady Franklin have fallen out, would also look as if Eleanor had less faith than Lady...

21 Feb 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/12

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on arrangements following the birth of one of the Gells's children [Mary Frances Gell]

Hoping that “dear Baby” will survive following her “slight improvement”, hoping to hear that Baby has taken to “a good, healthy wetnurse” who can look after her and sleep with her during the winter, should make her a “healthy child”; recounts story of George III’s wetnurse who insisted that he sleep with her; have received John’s note, want to know how Eleanor is, has gone through a lot, hopes that she is getting rest; dangers of going into new properties before they are properly dried and aired, Mr Scott was dangerously ill as a result, hopes that Ann will make sure everything dried and...

13 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/13

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on having the Gell children staying with her, with travel arrangements for their return

Eleanor’s letter sent from Mrs Dixon’s was delayed arriving, concerned about delays as they may be important; hopes that Eleanor’s eyes and general health will recover; cannot get an escort to London for the boys, will put them on the train at Derby next Tuesday, hope that guard will help them [to change trains] at Rugby, needs someone to meet them at 5:15 pm at Euston Station; sorry that Eleanor is finding her house cold, takes a long time to air a house, asks for a fire in the nursery all day Monday and all day Tuesday ready for the children; children are well, Philip “grows fat” and not...

25 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/14

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on having the Gell children staying with her, with travel arrangements for their return: with copies of religious texts said as prayers by Eleanor's children

Hopes the children will have a safe journey tomorrow, very sad that they are leaving; enclosing a list of the texts they say after prayers; Franklin has learned the 23rd Psalm; almost knows the first part of Watt’s first catechism; has marked which hymns he knows in the index in Watts’ Hymn Book, also knows two in “Hymns for Infant Minds”, Elizabeth will write down the 2nd verse of “I’m not too young”; reassures Eleanor that only had to speak to N. once about [washing] the children’s ears and heads and that had no need to complain further; sorry that have not been able to find a pair of...

27 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/15

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, before the Gells travel to France

Very pleased to welcome the two boys and their nurses on 14th July until the end of August when they will be going to be away from home themselves; hopes that they will all enjoy Paris and will find it not too hot but relaxing and with “shady walks for the children”; neighbour George Strutt suffered from the heat in France and was ill for six months afterwards; sorry to hear about Mina, glad she did not get hold of the “marking ink”, relief to have got rid of her, would have been afraid to leave E[leanor] with her whilst away, the expressions she used when Eleanor told her off at church...

29 Jun 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/16

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on arrangements for the Gell children to visit her: with envelope

Agrees that Ann can come to them for the sake of her health; Lizzie wants Philip to bring a square, red book; can he also bring some handkerchiefs and some bibs for Baby; has not heard of the biscuits Eleanor wants, can she send some and will try to get some similar?; “Very nice tops and bottoms are made at Derby”; delightful weather; hopes they will enjoy their trip; expects that the “dear little party” will arrive at Duffield Station at 6:30pm but please confirm; enclosing a note to send to Eleanor’s grocer; can the packets come with the children?; can Ann bring their dessert dishes...

5 Jul 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/17

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on assorted Gell family news

Sending a memoir of Adelaide Newton, as Eleanor slightly acquainted with her; good wishes for the new year to John, Eleanor and “the four darlings”; glad that Eleanor and the children have recovered from mumps; week before last had been extremely cold, discussion of keeping fire in overnight and method; has not heard of “the gas fires” before; kind but unsuccessful attempt by Mrs Booth to make peace; hopes Eleanor will have heard from Harriet; not sure when Frederick leaves Wingham, not sure when Harriet goes back; pleased that Harriet has been able to visit them as they don’t have many...

31 Dec 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/18

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the health of the younger Gell children, while the rest of the Gell family are away in Scotland

Pleased to receive pleasant news about them all this morning, Philip pleased and thanks Eleanor [child] for her letter, thanks to Franklin for his letter to Mary; Mary is ill and cannot write back; Mary and Baby suffering from diarrohea, Baby is getting better but Dr Williams has treated Mary, thinks it is worms and has given Mary some worm powder, then castor oil 2 hours later, thinks she will recover soon; doctor prescribed a poultice for the angry “place” on Baby’s cheek, can only do this when Baby is asleep, also gave him a dose of “grey powder”for diarrohea; will let her know about...

8 Aug 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/19

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the health of the younger Gell children, while the rest of the Gell family are away in Scotland

Writing to Glasgow rather than to Edinburgh; Mary is better but feeble, doctor’s advice about state of Mary’s bowels and “evacuations”, she is lively for short periods then exhausted and needs to sleep, little appetite, but Mary getting better every day; Baby’s cheek getting better but has a problem with the eyelids of one eye; nurse looks after him well; Philip pleased when he receives letters, hoping to send one back; thanks for sending Frederick’s letter to them to read, have received one from Thun where they are staying for a week; glad that they enjoyed Edinburgh, hopes that they will...

11 Aug 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/20

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the better health of the younger Gell children, while the rest of the Gell family are away in Scotland

All three children doing well; Mary is recovered, Baby is well except for “little humours” appearing on his eyelid and ear, no medicine required for this, Philip is well, are “all good children”, looking forward to seeing parents again; hopes that benefitting from being in Strathpeffers, contrast with Notting Hill; Philip asks if parents would see the Queen, long way from Balmoral; Frederick and Harriet studying German in Berlin; Uncle and Aunt Sim stayed a few days in Geneva then came home through France, left Paris “last Monday” and due to arrive at Wingham yesterday, a week earlier than...

2 Sep 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/6/21

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her daughter-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, expressing her opinions on the dangers of Roman Catholicism

Pleased to hear that “your circle” are in good health; hopes John will not work too hard and undermine his strength; heard that Mr Roberts has converted to Roman Catholicism; need to be vigilant about “doubtful character in the matter of religion”; wonders if Miss Crouch is “sound in faith?”; did not know until very recently that the Miss Simpkinson who is coming to stay is the same one who has converted to Roman Catholicism, asks that the children should not be with her very much, would not allow her own sister to be with children if she were “a Papist”, the three older ones are old...

12 Oct 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/7

Letters from Fredrick Gell to his sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell (nee Franklin)

 

1848-1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/7/1

Letter from Frederick Gell to his prospective sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Franklin, including reference to expeditions being sent to search for her father

Wishes to know how things finally stood with V.D.L. College before the bishop's departure; wants to know whether Mr White was to be the Warden after all and who is to be the Sub-Warden; it must be gratifying for her and Lady Franklin to know pains being taken to search for her father, albeit mingled with anxiety; he has heard he might be invited to stay with her at Harrow; he has left Brighton and is staying with Archdeacon Hare's curate, Venables, hoping to remain at Dallington until end of next week

1 Feb 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/7/2

Letter from Frederick Gell to his prospective sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on arrangements for meeting up

Will try to see her tomorrow in Charlotte Street; he has tried to see Mis Herring today but she is not visible, her servant saying she was not quite well; if he does not see her tomorrow, he will try to see next week as he goes through Clifton; he invites her to stay with him in Harrow.

16 Feb 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/7/3

Letter from Frederick Gell to his sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including reference to correspondence in "The Times" about the dispute between Eleanor and Lady Franklin

About Mr Edlin taking a Wrangler's Degree in 1847, a visit by the Prince and Duke of Brabant to Cambridge, and correspondence in "The Times", deploring a private quarrel being dragged before the public, involving Lady Franklin

29 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/8

Letters from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell (nee Franklin)

 

1848-1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/1

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her prospective sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

They were originally sent to J. Griffin's Esq, 21 Bedford Place, Russell Square, London.

13 Jan 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/2

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, congratulating her on her marriage to John Philip Gell

 

12 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/3

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to Eleanor leaving town before her confinement

21 Feb 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/4

First page of letter from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, following the announcement on the presumed deaths of Sir John Franklin and his men

Sympathy over distress following decision of the Admiralty; hope that her father may have long been at rest and spared suffering feared by his friends; hope that they stay away from the bishopric of Canterbury Settlement. Only dated Friday 27 Jan, and although 1851 or 1852 have been suggested in pencil, it is likely to be 1854.

27 Jan [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/5

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, mostly on family news

Eleanor's boys are with the Gells; references to death of John Gell's acquaintance, William Newton after being set on fire at Halifax in America (possibly in bed) and to Elizabeth's father visiting Buxton on Tuesday.

Only dated Friday 24 Nov, but 1854 has been added in pencil.

24 Nov [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/6

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Monday 28 Jan, but 1855 has been added in pencil.

28 Jan [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/8/7

Letter from Elizabeth Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, on ssorted family news

Thanks for forwarding F's letter; he wrote about the chaplaincy but answer not expected until next week, so no decision to be made until she had heard from him; reference to Mrs Hayne asking after Eleanor and hoping to see her; everything well apart from her father taking cold at the annual gathering of schools in Derby; concerns about Eleanor's housemaid, likely to say things to bring trouble on others.

Only dated 4 June, but 1855 has been added in pencil.

4 Jun [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/9

Letters from Harriet Isabella Gell to her sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1849-1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/9/1

Letter from Harriet Isabella Gell to her brother John Philip Gell and sister-in-law Eleanor Isabella Gell, with congratulations following the couple's marriage

 

12 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/9/2

Letter from Harriet Isabella Gell to sister-in law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including caution not to raise her hopes as regards news from the Arctic

Glad to hear of any glimpses of hope from the Arctic Regions; references to gifts of flowers in the family, including a parcel for Aunt Sim; she cautions her not to raise her expectations too high, as disappointment might be too great.

Only dated Monday morning 7 Oct, but likely to be year 1850 based on chronology.

7 Oct [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/9/3

Letter from Harriet Isabella Gell to sister-in law Eleanor Isabella Gell, including references to assorted family visits, including Frederick being with them and thinking of going to Wales with Uncle and Aunt Sim

 

10 Aug 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/10

Letters from Harriet Sim to her relation Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/10/1

Letter from Harriet Sim to her relation Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to Eleanor possibly taking on Caroline Petitt in the household on trial

Apologies for taking so long to reply; problem of illness of female servant, having feared scarlet fever; on Caroline Petitt being willing to trial a situation with Eleanor; kind love to John.

The letter is only dated 29 March, but the context with regard to Caroline Pettit suggests it is likely to be 1852.

29 Mar [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/10/2

Letter from Harriet Sim to her relation Eleanor Isabella Gell

Eleanor's letter has been forwarded to Scotsburn in Ross-shire and then on to Banff, which is why her answer has been delayed. She will write to Mrs Petitt about situation, if any other girl has not been chosen since; they left home 3 weeks ago, and joined the Gells at Edinburgh, who will return to Duffield, starting tomorrow; sorry there is feeling for opposition from Mr Gell to John's accepting the bishopric of Canterbury Settlement; her brother's motives are right in the sight of God and when he feels strongly about a subject, he always expresses himself strongly

24 Aug 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/11

Correspondence between aunt Elizabeth Franklin and niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1837-1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/11/1

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her aunt Elizabeth Franklin, describing her news since arriving with the rest of the Franklin family in Tasmania

She is taking the opportunity to write since in a day's time there is ship which is due to depart for England. She writes of gladly arriving Hobart on the 6th January and of having liked the ship ( The Fairlie ) very much, and that they had 80 children on board and more than 40 cabin passengers. Disagreeable weather after the Cape with several gales meant they did not have much dancing, and that the clergyman, Mr Mayres, gave instead lectures on the Jews . A young lady passenger on the ship married soon after their arriving at Hobart to which all were invited, which was the first...

21 Jun 1837

D8760/F/FEG/1/11/2

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her aunt Elizabeth Franklin, during the latter's residence in Tasmania

Because of her Aunt's 'always kindly encouragement' she is glad to write whenever she has the opportunity. It is long since she has heard from her Aunt and she hopes her Aunt has not been prevented from writing because of illness, and that before long she will have the pleasure of a letter from her. She thinks her Aunt by this time will have heard about the fever (spread throughout Hobart town ) that her mother, Sophy and Mary have had. The fever's most notable feature being 'great weakness'; and although Mary is quite recovered, her Mama and Sophy remain weakened by it, though...

22 May 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/11/3

Letter from Elizabeth Franklin to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during the latter's residence in Tasmania, including references to the evenst surrounding the coronation of Queen Victoria in England

Aunt's poor health, refers to Eleanor's description of proclamation of Queen in Hobart, not as splendid as in England, omission of champion exhibition and banquet from Coronation pageantry, cousin witnessed the Grand Procession, bells ringing in the countryside, plum cake for children, money for parents, Eleanor's description of fire in Government outbuildings, poisonous snakes, Jackass-songster, questions about naming of geographical features after friends and family, birthday wishes for Eleanor and her father, family illness, stormy and bad weather throughout England and Europe for the...

14 Aug 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/11/4

Letter from Elizabeth Franklin to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during the latter's residence in Tasmania, including references to Antarctic expedition of Captain James Ross, memorial for Matthew Flinders and engagement of Emily Sellwood to Alfred Tennyson

Aunt's pleasure in receiving letter, own health is poor; Aunt refers to Eleanor's description of the arrival of Captain Ross; laying of first stone for Government House, etc., and a Regatta; Sir John Franklin's increase in salary, hopes that this doesn’t mean they will stay longer than the intended 5 years in Van Dieman's land; reference to "second childhood" of her Aunt Flinders, purchase of "Betsey Island", naming of geographical discoveries after relatives etc., memorial to Captain Flinders to be erected in "Port Lincoln", bogus/very distant 'cousin' of Captain Flinders; hope for a...

2 Jul 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/11/5

Letter from Elizabeth Franklin to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to the assurances from the Admiralty about the safety of Sir John Franklin and news on Sir John Richardson's expedition: with envelope

Aunt refers to copy of Lord Auckland's letter and reassurance that Admiralty had looked after Sir John Franklin's safety, hopes for his safe return, her own health, circulating copies of Lord Auckland's letter to the wider family, Eleanor's health, Lady Franklin's "rambles into other countries", Sir John Ross's and Booth's interest in Sir John Franklin's expedition, Sir John Richardson having set out to search in the Spring, newspaper reports of safe arrival of search party in Hudson's Bay, plan to overwinter then pursue search in Spring.

Letter undated, but envelope postmarked Horncastle 8...

8 Nov 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/11/6

Letter from Elizabeth Franklin to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, congratulating her on her marriage to John Philip Gell, including references to the Franklin search expeditions: with envelope

Aunt congratulating Eleanor on her marriage, hopes for return of Sir John Franklin and Sir J. Richardson and Sir J. Ross searching for him, family news, reference to Lady Franklin's distress state of mind,

Date only given on letter as 15 July, but 1849 has been added later in pencil. Envelope postmarked for Horncastle 15 Jul 1849.

15 Jul 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/12

Correspondence between cousins Catherine Franklin later Rawnsley and Eleanor Isabella Franklin later Gell

The 10 letters written by Eleanor Franklin between 1832 and 1849 were sent by Catherine to John Philip Gell as keepsakes after Eleanor's death in 1860.

1832-1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/1

Letter from cousins Catherine and Willingham Franklin to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Catherine: they have been very busy and unable to write, with hopes of hearing about Tunbridge (including reference to little book about a donkey who goes there) and the Nottingham meadows being covered with purple crocuses.

Willingham: having been to Aspley and Gedling that Christmas, Apsley being where Uncle Burnside lives, with news of Nottingham Castle having been burned down by the mob (while the Kays were at Gedling)

5 Mar 1832

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/2

Letter from Catherine Franklin to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

11 Mar 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/3

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

Asks whether Catherine has forgotten her, as only two letters have reached her in the three years they have been absent from England. Details of her Mama's visit to Australia with Sophy Cracroft, Mr. Elliot, Captain Moriarty and Dr Hobson (lately arrived from England), setting sail on 1 April, arriving in Port Philip and Melbourne, travelling on to Sydney overland in May, and return journey by sea in August a longer sea trip than the average 10 days, returning home on 19 August Mention of the comparative architecture in Melbourne and Sydney and of the drought weather conditions during the...

6 Sep 1839

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/4

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

Note that letters have been missed (not arrived although sent). Mary Price has given birth to a son, 'large child but not fat' named John Frederic after a friend, born 3 October 1839; Mr Price is Assistant Police Magistrate. Eleanor is collecting insects and seeds for Willy together with dried specimens and descriptions with help from Mr Gunn, 'best botanist in the island'. Complaint that all at home think that New South Wales and Tasmania are the same whereas they are not. Plants mentioned by Catherine grow in New South Wales but not Tasmania. Lists of plants that Eleanor will send...

23 Nov 1839

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/5

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

The letter scolds Catherine for not writing often enough, only 4 letters received. Entreats Catherine to join them in Hobart, with an arranged escort out and returning with the family in two years. They have less than three years of their tenure left. News of the Cracoft family whom Eleanor regards as very close and that Isabella is engaged to Mr Lacy. Assuming the marriage has already taken place, they should be on their way to India. Concern for Isabella's mother for the loss of her child to India but is sure other will comfort her 'expecially dearest Kitty'. Glad that the Cracrofts...

18 Jun 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/6

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

Understands that Catherine has toured Europe with Aunt Simpkinson and awaits news of said trip. Clear that Catherine will not visit Hobart so meeting must wait Eleanor's return to England. 'I am afraid however we shall find England much altered for the worse, the late attempt upon our young Queen's life does not speak much in her favour'. A good rainy season has done well for farmers. Thanks Catherine for her gift to the Christian Knowledge Society who are still in need of funds. A note that Captains Ross and Crozier have left to search for the South Magnetic Pole and feels Ross will...

20 Nov 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/7

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

Delay in writing as Eleanor has been on a trip with Mama to South Australia. Travelled with Mr Gell, Mr Bagot, A.D.C., and Mama on the Brigatine Abcona on 13 December. They reached the Port of Adelaide on Christmas Day and were taken up the Creak to the Port. After a few hours they were greeted by Col. Gawler and his Private Secretary and taken by carriage to Government House. Mr Gell had wanted to make the journey to see his brother who lived at Government House. Riding in the hills they see 'natives' who survive by kangaroo meat and roots; others on the coast live entirely on fish...

6 Feb 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/8

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

Writing in haste. The twins' birthday is the 24 May and Mama has not returned, Sophy will be doing the honours. The house is being prepared for the ball. Captains Ross and Crozier are in Hobart, arriving from the Antarctic. Eleanor is awaiting news of Catherine's expedition to Germany. A play has been on at the theatre in Hobart called 'Antarctic Expeditions'. The two captains and Sir John and Lady Franklin are characterised along with Eleanor and Sophy. Characterisation is praised for its likeness in people enjoying wine, but disimilarity includes the Sir John character having a...

22 May 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/9

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Franklin

This and the last letter only a month apart because of the desire to thank Catherine profusely for the slippers sent by Catherine which she carpet-worked herself. Mama has returned by New Zealand to the news that 'our dear Archdeacon' had died whilst she was away. Mama will miss him as a counsellor. Mama returned with a strain and could not walk, she was later advised to use it as much as possible, after which it began to heal. Mama has reported on the missions in New Zealand and the baptising of many 'natives' and hundreds receiving the Sacrement. Mama prefers N.Zealand scenery to...

19 Jul 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/10

Letter from Eleanor Isabella Franklin to her cousin Catherine Rawnsley (nee Franklin)

Congratulations on Catherine's marriage; she notes that she had heard it a few weeks ago and had heard the details through Aunt Betsey. There are very few natives now in V.D. Land. The Franklins have the only native girl remaining and 'it will probably be a long time before she becomes quite civilised'. Disagreement between Lord Stanley and 'Papa' over Mr Montagu, letter from Lord Stanley for public consumption and a request from 'Papa' to acknowledge confidence in him or he will resign. It is not impossible that Mama might be returning ot England ; she has not been well for the last...

14 Feb 1843

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/11

Letter from Catherine Rawnsley to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell: with envelope

Following Eleanor's marriage

31 Jul 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/12

Letter from Catherine Rawnsley to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

They are thinking of her, with her anxiety felt that day; Drummond asks that she wil not fail to write him a line about the Rugby election, as he feels an interest in it and Mr Gell, who D. says is the best man standing; better news from Aunt Wright about Mary's health; she had not liked Eleanor's looks when she saw her, but she was in mourning, and hopes she feels better; Louisa Turner and her husband has visited, and she looks much changed for the better, and she really likes Charles; reference to the bride and bridegroom Simpkinson and surprise at his standing for Rugby. The letter is...

[late 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/13

Letter from Catherine Rawnsley to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell: with envelope

The letter (2 sheets) is undated, but 6 Feb 1850 has been added in pencil at top. Envelope includes some writing inside, postmarked for Reading, 6 Feb 1850. All items black-edged.

6 Feb 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/14

Letter from Catherine Rawnsley to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Enclosing letter of Eleanor's father to Emma Franklin's father; Emma has a one-sided view of her father's character, and now she is among his family, it is only fair to let her see all was not satisfactory or agreeable; Catherine has four letters of Sir John, which Eleanor can read; she would not give them away as autographs to be cut out; her "chicks" are all well, though not equal to Eleanor's in weight and size. Only dated 27 April; years 1853 or 1854 in pencil.

27 Apr [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/12/15

Letter from Catherine Rawnsley to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

The letter is only dated 30 June, but 1855 has been added in pencil

30 Jun [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/13

Letters from Emma Franklin to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Emma Franklin (1832-1871) was the daughter of Major James Franklin and the niece of Sir John Franklin. She later married Reverend Henry Clarke Mitchinson in 1856.

1849-1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/13/1

Letter from Emma Franklin to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated Thursday, but 19 Oct 1849 has been added in pencil

[19 Oct 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/13/2

Letter from Emma Franklin to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter identified in pencil as from Emma Franklin, afterwards Mrs Mitchinson

11 Jan 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/14

Letters from Fanny Lydia Franklin, wife of Willingham Franklin, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/14/1

Letter from Fanny Franklin to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Apology for coming to see her and her baby before leaving London.

Letter only dated 23 May, but 1850 has been added in pencil.

23 May [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15

Letters from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

All the letters relate to the period after Eleanor's marriage to John Philip Gell in June 1849. Hannah (1778-1867) was one of the seven sisters of Eleanor's father, Sir John Franklin. She had nursed Eleanor's mother at the time of her death, after which she briefly took care of Eleanor herself.

1849-1858

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/1

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, wishing Eleanor happiness following her marriage to John Philip Gell

Good wishes and God's blessing on niece and her new husband; duties of a wife; God's blessing on their future married life; staying at Miss Booth's; arrangements for receiving post; her husband also send his love to niece and new nephew.

18 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/2

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, following Eleanor's marriage, making reference to fear that Lady Franklin's mind woudl not be calmed by Sir John Richardson's letters

She informs her that her son intends to call on her and to be introduced his new cousin, her husband; he has gone up to town with their nephew Audley Booth to be fitted out to join the 73rd Regiment as an Ensign, and he will not have much time to spare; it is a comfort to them to hear of her happiness and she conveys their sincere prayers for its long continuation. She has heard nothing of or from her Mama since she left St George’s church. She fears there is no chance of her mind being calmed by the letters they have received from her dear son in law (Sir John Richardson – in pencil...

24 Jul 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/3

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on assorted family news

New years wishes to Eleanor and her family. She still hopes to welcome her brother home. She has not heard from Lady Franklin, but has heard about her, as well as the Gells, from Louisa Turner; her niece Mary Wright is heavily afflicted; she is glad Eleanor got her brother-in-law F. Gell to call on Arthur [Wright]; grandson Thomas Booth has typhus, seized of it at Eton, but now home; Herbert has been with them for two weeks, having left Rugby, and has gone to Dr Pacey's to meet Edith; Aunt Betsey is a wonder and an example of patient suffering; Eleanor's family are well at Buckingham Villa...

1 Jan 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/4

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on news of Eleanor being in good health and expecting a baby, plus gift of brooch which Eleanor's mother's had given to Elizabeth Franklin

February 7th: glad to hear that in good health expecting a baby; hopes God will support them; Mrs Gell called to give the news; Mrs Gell and Mr Gell busy arranging to leave Clifton; enclosing memorial brooch which had been given by Eleanor's mother's to Hannah's sister, but as the sister has now died [Elizabeth Franklin], she is giving the memorial brooch to niece in dual memory of Eleanor's mother and aunt; has received a letter from Louisa Turner; uncles sends his love.

February 8th: arrangments for sending the brooch; distribution of deceased sister's "trifles as small memorials of her...

7-8 Feb [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/5

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, concerning hopes and reassurance on search expedition for Franklin, with assorted family news

Mentions Mary Anne Kendall, Caroline Gell; appreciative of Eleanor's concerns for her feelings, trusts in God but trying not to get away with feeling that "all is well", has never lost hope; complete absence of information about where the expedition has gone; sure that God is guiding them; hopes that everyone will be brought back safe to their families; cannot hear anything until April or maybe end of March; build upon what they know for certain; trust in God; Eleanor's duties; will send a parcel for Louisa Tennyson Turner via Annie Weld, memento of Aunt Booth's sister; letter from "your...

9 Mar 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/6

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, including references to Dr Rae's despatches and the continued divisions between Eleanor and Lady Franklin

She expects letters every day from Mr Gell. She hears from Aunt Cracroft that Eleanor has lost her cough. She is sorry that Eleanor does not have some one from her family with her but her Aunt Kay is nearby. She writes that the disappointment attending Mr Rae’s despatch must not damp their hope that as he did not gain the desired point, no one can. They will still hope that God’s almighty power is over the ‘dear wanderers’ and he will relieve their anxious minds by revealing the secret of their long detention and bring them all in safety to the bosom of their families and friends. She...

11 May 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/7

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, following the news of promotion of Sir John Franklin as Rear Admiral

Congratulations to Eleanor on the "advanced rank of your dear Father"; praying that he may still come back; 52 years last month since he joined the navy on 'Polyphemus'; he has served in war, explorations, was shipwrecked, suffered hardships, trusts in God; hopes he may come back to his family and friends in the next few months; cannot know anything until next year about Sir Ed. Belcher, although might hear something from the pacific route; Uncle Booth is reasonably well and sends his love, love to children and to niece; arrangements for collection of someone from Winchester station...

1 Nov [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/8

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, including references to search expedition being sent to the Behring Strait

Expecting arrival of nephew; purchased presents for Eleanor, John Franklin and baby to send by their father; wishes that niece could have come with her husband; newspapers say that sailing vessel with supplies being sent to Behring Strait, steamer will tow it through Straits of Magellan; Admiralty will not send out another steamer; 'Isobel'achieved a lot in a short time, would achieve more than a sailing ship with an inexperienced Commander; angry that whims being indulged; hopes that will hear from Captain Collinson or Sir Edward Belcher this season; hopes to see brother and companions...

2 Feb 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/9

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to the circumstances after the death of Eleanor's mother's death and the will and papers of Sir John Franklin

Happy to have nephew to stay; sorry that he had not been better informed about brother's affairs since his marriage; had not wanted to pry; had assumed that there were others better able to deal with his affairs; was in the house when Eleanor's mother died; had stayed on after brother's departure on last Land Arctic Expedition because he and wife both wished it; business matters were dealt with by Eleanor's aunt at that time; Aunt Booth took Eleanor and wet nurse to Aunt Cracroft's, no other involvement in brother's affairs; when returned from expedition Eleanor was not well so Aunt Booth...

9 Feb 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/10

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on search expeditions, including on voluntary funding by Lady Franklin and colonists of Tasmania

Wider family is scattered; 'Isabel' is going out, privately funded, to Behring's Straits, taking supplies to searchers; ought to be Government funded; £500 sent by colonists of Van Dieman's land to help pay for search; hopes this year will have news; Frank Simpkinson did not destroy the Bond "for his own sake"; Lady Franklin unlikely to be able to put it to use for funding, has just voluntary funding and own monies; has received a letter from Emma, intends to live with Mr Evans' family in Wales; son spending few days in London in April; Mary Anne and two grand-daughters coming; uncle is...

15 Mar 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/11

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on request to stay with the Gells during tour of visiting assorted family members

Request to stay with niece after the first week of June, and at end of tour visiting grandchildren at Haslar, sister at Winchester and Catharine Rawnsley at Shiplake; needs to visit dentist in Town, also see grandchildren at Blackheath and Woolwich, and Willingham at Dr Batts; husband cannot come with her; love to nephew and niice, Emma, kisses for children

28 May 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/12

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to Sir John Franklin having worked hard for his county without receiving much from the Government

Times newspaper has introduced Eleanor and husband to the public; British public support for her brother to be paid, wherever he is; has served his country since he was young; their father paid for him to be "fitted out, at a great expense in those days" so he could go on a voyage of discovery; lost everything in a shipwreck; East India Company paid £30 prize money; father had to fit him out again; brother has always worked hard; immediate family have never received anything from Government, except Thomas Cracroft working for Sir E. Wilmot; the Rays and Frank Simpkinson may have, but...

1 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/13

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to the furore over the marriage of Emma Cracroft to George Benjamin Lefroy

She was so shocked by Eleanor's letter that she wrote to her sister [Isabella Cracroft]; it is a trial for Eleanor and her husband; Isabella's child is married not from home but from that of one which her brother could not enter. No member of the Booth or Gell families had been honoured by having discovered places named after them; she asks Eleanor to stay, with her child Eleanor and maid; she returns Beechey's letter on hopes surrounding Nova Zembla and Spitzbergen; hope still exists on the abundance of food; she has written to Aunt Cracroft to have the wedding at her house with a social...

3 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/14

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, including report on the return of Lieutenant Inglefield's expedition, renewing hopes in search for Eleanor's father

Report of return of Lieutenant Inglefield, who went "farther Easterly Smith's Sound and thence westwardly to Cape Rily and through Burrows Straits", further than any other search vessels, drawing great comfort from the report; Penny discovered it first, then Sir Ed. Belcher confirmed it; grounds for hope, trust that God will bring them all back home safe; God has kept father safe in battle, storms, shipwreck, must trust in God, father has never forgotten God or his duty; everyone is grateful to Lady Franklin for her great efforts; Lady Franklin's motivation "from unkindness"; nevertheless...

16 Nov [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/15

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the marriage of Emma Cracroft, including references to correspondence of John Philip Gell in the press: with envelope

She apologises for not replying sooner as she has had a severe attack of influenza. She recommends that Eleanor follows the advice of her son in law (Sir John Richardson, written in pencil) and would urge the search in the direction he seems to think best. They believe what he says of the Esquimaux because he has knowledge of their character and habits. She hopes that the Admiralty will send out an expedition eastward, as the Geographical Society thinks something may be gathered from there. Captain Inglefield likely to commission and command the Phoenix for the expedition according to...

26 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/16

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the situation following the Admiralty announcement on the presumed death of Sir John Franklin and his men, including on plans to open his will

The [Franklin] sisters will pay the last tribute of affection for their brothers on 31st March; all their brothers were "upright and just", trust they are all in heaven; those left behind to mourn should put trust in God; uncle will ask again about the will in Henry Booth's papers, although already had a negative answer; will write to Aunt Cracroft; will write to Lady Franklin, who is "under a dominion, which appears to predominate over good judgment"; Mr Gell has written to Lady Franklin; Lefroys may be able to help; Mr Weld stirs things up; writing in the Times about Lady Franklin's...

29 Jan 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/17

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, including references to Kane's expedition and caution to Emma Franklin not to pass on opinons to Lady Franklin

Not sure if it was her niece but she is grateful for having been sent the Daily News and Morning Chronicle; both newspapers have letters from America; Morning Chronicle gives extracts from letters from Dr Kayne's [Kane] expedition currently on the eastern side of Smith's Sound; trust in God that eventually will find out what happened; feelings of families involved; should analyse results of search parties before planning new ones, try to work out where best to search further; wondering about lecture by a Mr Horrington; hopes Eleanor is well; wondering if she has heard from Emma Franklin...

10 Feb [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/18

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, thanking her for sympathy on the death of her husband, John Booth

Death of Hannah Booth's husband; grateful for sympathy of niece and husband; has found strength in God; deceased husband's good Christian life; communication today from niece, also the Times yesterday to her son, news of the relics have given her some comfort that her brother is no longer suffering, he is at peace with God along with her husband, and the family's anxiety about where he might be is "now set at rest"; brother and husband both "well prepared" for heaven; love to niece and husband

25 Oct 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/19

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the recognition of Sir John Franklin being dead and on reconciliation between Eleanor and Lady Franklin

Grateful to niece and husband for offer to stay with them; hopes to be with them in mid-December; hopes to find them in good health; grateful to God; praying for His guidance; husband and brother in "heavenly rest"; both lived according to God's commands; glad that niece reconciled with Lady Franklin and that she is coming to stay with them; hopes that there will be no future estrangement; has written to Lady Franklin twice but no reply "as yet"; hopes that time will sooth Lady Franklin, reality, no longer needs to speculate; Government are searching for records, cannot do anything else...

23 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/20

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on visits and assorted family news

Has arrived from Shiplake this morning having stayed longer with Catharine; travelled with Catharine to Paddington; has been to see niece's children, going to have tea with the boys; sympathises that Eleanor is still "harrassed with unprofitable correspondence", must trust to God; prospect of Catharine Cracroft marrying clergyman, with hope that wedding will not be like Emma's, which she believed was of an "improper and unfeeling character"; Sir John Richardson passed over in favour of a junior, J Liddle, and offered Greenwich (vacated by Liddle), which casused Richardson to resign; love to...

25 Apr [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/21

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on assorted family news

Aunt not feeling well, staying at home; duty not to feel sorry for herself; getting older; best wishes for nephew's recovery; best wishes for Eleanor and children's health; regards to cousin Emma.

8 Jan 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/22

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, while the Gells are in Scotland, recounting her own tour there 17 years previously

Aunt was in Inverness 17 years ago; enjoyed her "Scotch tour"; wanted to point out where stayed with Laird of Appin, before Eleanor took Caledonian Canal Steamer; Aunt visited Fort Augustus and Fort William, Inverness, Fort George, Moray Firth, Cairn[gorm] mountains, Blair Athol, Dunkeld, Edinburgh, Kelso, Melrose, Abbotsford; away eleven weeks; glad to hear that they have been able to enjoy themselves; hope that she will not over-reach her strength "in the hour of need"; children and grandchildren well; Clement gone to Rugby; Thomas and Herbert "at their separate posts"; all are better at...

20 Aug [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/23

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on assorted family news, including the Gells travelling in Scotland

Opportunity for the Gells to see Mr Rawnsley and Drummond, travelling to Scotland by train; Catharine getting better; Eleanor enjoying good weather in Scotland; letter received from Mary Price, "forlorn state", son James returning to Liverpool on 'Great Brisbane' steamer, wants to be a sailor; Mary in Melbourne awaiting decision of Government; no news from Lady F. or Sophy; hope children enjoying Scotland; Aunt Wright is better; everyone else the same as usual; J. Richardson wants to go to India; love from Tom and Mary Anne and Aunt

1 Sep 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/24

Letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, while Eleanor is on holiday in Jersey, including reference to hopes for McClintock's expedition

Aunt looks back with pleasure at place where Eleanor is currently staying [St Brelade, Jersey]; "heavy sorrow" there but received "many blessings and kindness"; parents of Rollways live at Gunby, know them well; father is a solicitor at Spilsby, magistrates' clerk for Lindsey; elder son is barrister living at Richmond; other son is in Army or soon to be; where Eleanor is staying is the place were Sir Wm Hooker's daughter died and was buried, at St Brelade's; Mary knew her; beauty of bays; visited 13 or 14 years ago; new houses do not always improve romantic scenery; nephew Willingham...

27 Aug 1858

D8760/F/FEG/1/15/25

Last page of letter from Hannah Booth to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the state of health of assorted family members, while Eleanor is on holiday in Jersey

She is glad to say Aunt Wright is as well as expected with Harriet having a bad attack of diptheria, Mary and Richard tolerable, Alice at Shiplake; Arthur has broken a bone in his right hand, but is now better, having dined with her and Richard; she hopes the Gells are well and looks forward to hearing accounts from Eleanor, Franklin and Philip about Jersey.

The letter is undated, but the only time the Gells were in Jersey, as far as know, is in August 1858.

[Aug 1858]

D8760/F/FEG/1/16

Letters from John Booth to his niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/16/1

Letter from John Booth to his niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the wearing of mourning clothes following the Admiralty announcement on the presumed deaths of Sir John Franklin and his men

Aunt busy packing because Mr Fowler has only just told them that "has given up this house some months ago"; will be wearing mourning when he come to Town in June; concern about upsetting other members of the family , regarding "this distressing subject in Lincolnshire"; will try to promote good relations in the family; assures Eleanor that he and wife not guided by Lady Franklin; doesn't think the wider Lincolnshire family are either; encloses letter from Sir J. Richardson; love to Eleanor, Mr Gell and children on "this melancholy occasion"; he is better following period of gout.

14 Mar 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/17

Letters from Mary Richardson nee Booth, second wife of Sir John Richardson, to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

1844

D8760/F/FEG/1/17/1

Letter from Mary Richardson, second wife of Sir John Richardson, to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, just after Eleanor's arrival back in England from Tasmania, including references to Eleanor's engagement and Sir John's Franklin's grievances involving Lord Stanley

If Eleanor's father wil pay £28 10s in to Stilwell's hands, she will pay the bills here; he lives in Arundel Street, Strand, and is John's agent. They are glad to hear Lord Stanley has seen her uncle and is sure he will have been gracious and anxious to please "as cheaply as he could": she hopes for the settlement of her uncle's grievances. She encloses a note from Mr Price's sister about Mary and her brother, and another from a married sister, to whom he would send answer about her knowledge of Mr [?]Fisher; she asks Eleanor to get her uncle to read her notes and send her a reply for Mrs...

21 Jun [1844]

D8760/F/FEG/1/18

Letters from Sir John Richardson and his third wife Mary to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1848-1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/1

Letter from Mary Richardson, third wife of Sir John Richardson, to Eleanor Isabella Gell, including references to those trying to comfort "Arctic wives and daughters" and the widepsread ignorance of Arctic geography

Delay in answering Eleanor's letter due to headaches and preparing for Jospehine's departure; Eleanor's hopefulness raises her own; she has written to George Back, after failing to receive reply from Mr Barclay; sympathises with Eleanor's views on attitude to Arctic wives and daughters, with the unintentional mistakes caused by ignorance of northern geography; when anyone talks to her on the subject, she gets out a map and shows them the distance between the searching parties. The major difference between Christians concerns the turning to prayer rather than being orthodox; she recommends...

24 Oct 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/2

Letter from Mary Richardson, third wife of Sir John Richardson, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Dated Monday 1 Oct, but 1849 has been added in pencil at top.

1 Oct [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/3

Letter from Sir John Richardson to Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to subjects arising from search expeditions and the prospect of future expeditions, including uncomplimentary references to the Eskimo peoples, and on the publicity about the dispute between the Gells and Lady Franklin

Signature cut off but identified as Sir John Richardson at top in different hand

12 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/4

Letter from Sir John Richardson to Eleanor Isabella Gell, giving his opinions on the ships H.M.S. Erebus and Terror having been supposedly sighted

Including references to her opinions on the drifting of the Erebus and Terror out of their anchorage and their desertion by the crews matching his own, the examples provided by other ships, Eskimo account of ship masts, it being unlikely that the ships' crews would not have communicated with the Eskimos, who were aware of the search

25 Nov 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/5

Letter from Sir John Richardson to Eleanor Isabella Gell, advising her with regards to search expeditions

Advising her to accept what the Admiralty makes public what it decides to do and to act under proper legal advice; he suggests Mr Tilney, one of the Masters in Chancery, an intimate friend of her father's. There is a pencil note in later hand at the top saying the letter refers to the necessity of preventing Lady Franklin from spending money in the search for Sir John Franklin, which if he were dead, would be the property of his daughter.

19 Jan 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/6

First page of letter from Sir John Richardson to Eleanor Isabella Gell, after the fate of Franklin's expedition has been established by John Rae's reports

Details communicated by Dr Rae must have grieved the friends of all parties, the only consolation being that her father must not have been at the final scene where 40 died of cold and starvation near the mouth of Back's river; reflections on the likelihood of scurvy between 1846 and 1850 and the oversight in not erecting beacons and signals posts, which James Ross might have seen in 1849.

23 Oct 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/7

Letter from Mary Richardson, third wife of Sir John Richardson, to Eleanor Isabella Gell, on Richardson's belief that he has done all he can in terms of advice to the Admiralty as reagrds further search expeditions

Sir John Richrdson having suggested all he can to her with his letter to the Admiralty, saying any advice volunteered by any naval officer would only give offence, but if the Lords of the Admiralty were to consult him again, he could give his opinion as in his expedition report; he is not without hope from last summer's search by Mr Rae, whom he thinks better fitted than himself to continue the search

26 Nov 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/8

Letter from Sir John Richardson to Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the death of his daughter Josephine

Paper black-edged

22 Sep 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/18/9

Autograph of John Richardson cut out of black-edged letter

 

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/1/19

Letters from Thomas Willingham Booth to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/19/1

Letter from Thomas Willingham Booth to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to deed Eleanor is hoping to find

Relating to deed; he has written to Mr Sellwood; Macintosh is a good man, and while he lives, nothing seriously prejudicial to Emma's interest will be allowed; invitation for her and Mr Gell to visit. PS: sympathy for her anxiety over her father. Dated only 2 Feb, but year 1850 added in pencil

2 Feb [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/19/2

Letter from Thomas Willingham Booth to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to deed Eleanor is hoping to find

Receipt of letter from Mr Sellwood on his not knowing whereabouts of settlement of Mrs Hessing's property; if Macintosh does not have deed, it may be among her father's papers; the trustees wil be cautious; pleased at the tone of the debate in the House of Commons on the Arctic Expedition and glad that another searching party will be sent via Lancaster Sound.

Dated only 8 Feb, but year 1850 added in pencil.

8 Feb [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20

Letters from Isabella Cracroft nee Franklin to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1841-1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/1

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Cross-hatched handwriting, quite difficult to read

6 Jan 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/2

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Only dated Tuesday; 26 Aug 1848 added in pencil

26 Aug [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/3

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, following Eleanor's marriage to John Philip Gell

Only dated 15 June, but 1849 has been added in pencil.

15 Jun [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/4

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the fears for Eleanor's father, including reference to Sir James Ross's arriving home from his expedition without news of Franklin

Only dated 6 Nov; 1849 added in pencil

6 Nov [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/5

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, congratulating her on the prospect of her soon becoming a mother.

Undated, but marked 1850 in pencil at top; Eleanor gave birth to her first child on 15 May 1850. Paper black-edged

[early 1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/6

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the health of Eleanor's baby, turning down a request to make knitwear for it, with a reference to emigrants to the Canterbury Settlement in New Zealand

Dated only 4 Sep, but 1850 added in pencil

4 Sep [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/7

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Dated only 7 May, but 1851 has been added in pencil

7 May [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/8

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 3 June, but 1851 added in pencil

3 Jun [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/9

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell. offering advice on the best way to feed her baby

Only dated 6 June, but 1851 added in pencil

6 Jun [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/10

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Dated only 11 Aug, but 1851 has been added in pencil

11 Aug [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/11

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, wishing Eleanor a happy birthday, but lamenting that their relationship was not quite what it used to be

Dated only 2 June, but 1852 has been added in pencil,

2 Jun [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/12

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, turning down an invitation from the Gells but passing on news of her family and acquaintances

Only dated 24 July [could be 14th], but 1852 added in pencil

24 Jul [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/13

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on assorted family news, including on appointment of nurse for Eleanor's baby

Dated only 27 July, but 1852 has been added in pencil

27 Jul [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/14

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, on the recent engagement of her daughter Emma Cracroft to George Benjamin Lefroy

On the engagement of Emma Cracroft, the marriage being unlikely to happen later that year; reference is made to the Mr Lefroy being the nephew of the Lefroys of Montagu Square.

Only dated 19 August; years 1851, 1852 and 1857 all marked in pencil. She married George Benjamin Lefroy in the October quarter of 1853

19 Aug [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/20/15

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Dated only 4 Nov, but 1852 added in pencil. Cross-hatched writing difficult to read

4 Nov [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/21

Letters from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1847-c1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/21/1

Letter from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin: with envelope

Following illness of some sort. Only dated 16th and 28th, but envelope marked 1 Nov.

16-28 Oct 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/21/2

Letter from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, written prior to Eleanor's marriage

Including on Augusta Moore asking Eleanor when her marriage will be. Undated, but "?1849" added in pencil at top.

[early 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/21/3

Letter from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, including reference to hopes regarding Eleanor's father

 

Jan 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/21/4

Letter from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Undated but 3 April 1851 added in pencil

[3 Apr 1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/21/5

Letter from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 14 May, but 1852 added in pencil

14 May [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/21/6

Letter from Catherine Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, on assorted family news

Thanks for generous present [? glasses] with reference to troughs for "Emma's dear little pig", whom Mama will be amused in looking after some times; Emma has problems with her ears, which Mr Harvey will syringe; she asks if Eleanor has consulted old Dr Tompson; she hopes Eleanor may be able to follow the advice of Mr Guillemard, wondering whether he is the son or nephew of the poor old man whose death is daily expected; Augusta's husband is recovering from an attack of inflamation, but is still extremely delicate. It must be delightful for Eleanor to hear Dr Cadman in weekly services; she...

[c1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/22

Letters from cousin Emma Cracroft to Eleanor Isabella Franklin later Gell

 

1836-1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/22/1

Letter from Emma Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Reference to this being the last letter to Eleanor In England, as her letter will probably be directed to Van Diemen's Land. Letter undated but "?1837" pencilled in; the Franklins left England for Van Diemen's Land on 26 Aug 1836

[1836]

D8760/F/FEG/1/22/2

Letter from Emma Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to the proposed wedding of her sister Isabella Cracroft

Dated only 13 March, but Isabella'a marriage to Saumares de Lacy is believed to have taken place early in 1840. Cross-hatched handwriting, quite difficult to read.

13 Mar [1840]

D8760/F/FEG/1/22/3

Letter from Emma Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, including reference to the wedding of her sister Isabella Cracroft

Including reference to Issy's wedding having taken place. Only dated 11 Nov, but the wedding reference will be for Isabella Cracroft, believd to have taken place in 1840. Cross-hatched handwriting, difficult to read

11 Nov [1840]

D8760/F/FEG/1/22/4

Letter from Emma Isabella Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell: with envelope

Letter (2 sheets) only dated Saturday: 3 Dec 1849 added in pencil. Envelope postmarked for 4 Dec 1849, including writing in inside from"C.C." [Catherine Cracroft]

3 Dec 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/22/5

Letter from Emma Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Dated only Wednesday, but marked in pencil as 23 Feb 1850

[23 Feb 1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/23

Letters from Isabella Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/23/1

Letter from Isabella Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, written while Eleanor was in Tasmania

Incorporating print of view from the South Pier Head, Guernsey, known to Eleanor but different to her view in Van Diemen's Land. Eleanor is with Sophy. Asking what Eleanor likes to study. Catherine walks with Susan every morning. Mr Watts has left Guernsey and is now near Bath. She misses Eleanor.

16 Sep 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/24

Letters from Sophia Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin later Gell

 

1840-1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/24/1

End of letter from Sophia Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, reporting on her journey in Tasmania

Sophy's alarm at almost being attacked by animal, which was intercepted by "the driver"; the continuation of her journey with her Sir John and Lady Franklin, including references to Mr Martyn's at Westbury, Mr and Mrs Ashburner's at Launceston; her decision not carry on along the West Coast but to go to Avoca on Saturday 18th, hoping to meet up again with the Franklins the following week and return to Hobarton via Jerusalem Richmond. She will be glad to see Eleanor, whom she sess as her younger sister; Eleanor is to send the chain she has made for her father on his birthday [16 April]; she...

early Apr 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/24/2

Letter from Sophia Cracroft to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Sophia did not have the remotest intention of implying in her remark to her uncle that Eleanor lacked the conscientiousness of her father; Eleanor's decision rests mainly on the the feelings of others, irrespective of the altered circumstances in which John Gell has been place; her uncle's consent would be given in consequence of those circumstances. No implication was intended by Sophia, who was only speaking openly and nothing more; she would not forestall Eleanor on the subject in question. Dr Rae's report has been published in the newspaper; she feared Aunt would feel the return of her...

[Nov 1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/25

Letters from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin later Gell

 

1842-1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/1

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Letter is undated but 1842 has been added in pencil at top

[1842]

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/2

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

5 Apr 1844

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/3

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Reference is made to the Prices not knowing whether they will return to Van Diemen's Land, and to the death of Sir E. Willot. Letter is undated; "1844?" has been added in pencil at top, but the reference to Sir E. Wilmot makes 1847 more likely as a year.

[1847]

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/4

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

15 Nov 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/5

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

21 Apr 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/6

Part of letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

There is no date but references to Mr Boyes and Mr Henslowe, public servants in Tasmania, suggest early in the year 1851

[Mar 1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/7

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Envelope poststamped for Launceston 24 Oct 1851

22 Sep 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/25/8

Letter from Mary Price to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

22 May 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/26

Letters from Julia Price, sister of the husband of Mary Price nee Franklin, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/26/1

Letter from Julia Price to Eleanor Gell

Letter only dated Monday, but 10 Aug 1857 has been added in pencil. Paper black-edged. Julia Price was the sister of John Giles Price, who was married to Mary (nee Franklin), niece of Sir John Franklin and cousin of Eleanor Gell (nee Franklin), and who was murdered by Australian convicts on 27 March 1857.

10 Aug [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/27

Letters from Henry Sellwood to his niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1849-1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/27/1

Letter from Henry Sellwood to his niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Relating to the extent of the powers left by Eleanor's father to Lady Franklin and the authority she has to dispose of any of his property. 2 sheets with envelope, with postmarks for Farnham 20 May 1849, and 21 May 1849 (no place)

20 May 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/27/2

Letter from Henry Sellwood to his niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

22 May 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/28

Letters from cousin Anne Weld (nee Sellwood) to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

[1849-1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/28/1

Letter from Anne Weld to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Apologies for not calling; reference to rumour of the safety of the expedition; invitation to the Gells to meet Mr and Mrs Owen; Anne having met Aunt Dixon, and liking her much on further acquaintance, Dated only 7 Oct; "?1849" added in pencil

7 Oct [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/28/2

Letter from Anne Weld to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Joy at hearing from Frank on long-desired reunion of Eleanor and Anne's aunt; her having overfatigued herself househunting last week with Alfred [Tennyson in pencil]; asking for recommendation of Eleanor's nurse for Emily [Tenyson in pencil] and a friend expecting confinement like Emily in April; hearing of news that Sir John Franklin was reported safe, but not known to the Admiralty, so supposing it a shameful hoax got up by the paper, and of report being published on the stage at Drury Lane in the middle of a Shakespeare play; love to Mr Gell and Eleanor's baby . Only dated 23 Dec; year...

31 Dec [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/29

Letters from Emily Tennyson (nee Sellwood) to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/29/1

Letter from Emily Tennyson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated 2 Aug, but the year 1850 has been added in pencil. Written during her honeymoon with the poet Alfred Tennyson.

2 Aug [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/30

Letters from Louisa Turner (nee Sellwood) to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/30/1

Letter from Louisa Turner to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Congratulations on her marriage to Mr Gell. Envelope marked as from Mrs Tennyson Turner (Honeymoon) and postmarked for 9 June 1849.

7 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/31

Letters from Henrietta Weekes Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1849-1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/1

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including on rumours about the search expeditions, the Evening Journal not being like the others which report any vague rumour; not having received anything from Jane or Sophy since she saw Eleanor last, but knowing they write to Willingham and that they have left Aberdeen for the Highlands, hoping to stumble upon the Queen. Only dated 29 Aug but reference to Lady Franklin being in Scotland may make 1849 a possible year.

29 Aug [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/2

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to Sir James Ross's return from his unsuccessful search and Esquimaux sighting of ships. Only dated 8 Nov.

8 Nov [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/3

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

On sending her the portrait of Eleanor's father; more information on the disposal of her father's pictures and other items; reference to items not lent to her late sister [Elizabeth]. Dated only 5 Feb, but year must be 1850, as the death of Elizabeth on 10 Jan 1850 is the only sister whose date fits. Paper black-edged.

5 Feb [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/4

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Reference to servant being commissioned to send plaster cast of Sir John Richardson, bronzed and given by Mary Richardson to her, in a small box which also holds socks made by Henrietta's sister. Letter only dated Tuesday 19 Feb, which tallies with year 1850.

19 Feb [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/5

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Reference to Eleanor, Mr Gell, baby and nurse being due to visit next week. Letter only dated 6 June, but "1850?" has been added in pencil.

6 Jun [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/6

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated 27 Sep, but 1850 has been added in pencil

27 Sep [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/7

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including references to the "Prince Albert", which Henrietta thought might be the one sent in search of Eleanor's father last year, the "Plover" Lady Jane Simpkinson being in poor health, the poor eyesight of Mr Griffin, and the stagnant state of agriculture the last two years. Letter dated only 6 Feb, but year is probably 1851, as the "Prince Albert" set off in 1850.

6 Feb [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/8

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell; with envelope

Letter only dated 13 Feb, envelope postmarked 14 Feb 1851

13 Feb 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/9

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

References to the search expeditions going up Wellington Channel rather than southwards, their "workwoman" being at the Exhibition , and Mary Wright being still alive but likely to die soon . Letter is only dated 19 Sep, but 1851 has been added in pencil

19 Sep [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/10

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including references to Lieutenant Pim's proposal to search in Russia ans whether it would be allowed by the authorities in Russia. Letter only dated 23 Jan, but year likely to 1852

23 Jan [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/11

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated 6 Oct, but 1852 has been added in pencil

6 Oct [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/12

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

20 Dec 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/13

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

17 Dec 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/14

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

3 Feb 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/15

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

On the question of putting on mourning clothes on 31 March or waiting other news, good or bad, is received from Sir Edward Belcher; asks whether they should ask the families of the other offices are going to do; whetehr right or wrong Lady Franklin is due some deference; she has heard of the sentiments regarding Lady Franklin's dis-satisfaction with her brother's will; need to take into consideration the feelings of the families of the other officers. Letter only dated 13 Feb, but the mourning reference makes it likely to be 1854.

13 Feb {1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/16

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

On not taking sides in dispute between Lady Franklin and the Gells without knowledge of all the circumstances; case appears to be centred on whether it is reasonable to put on mourning before tidings from the ships engaged in the search for her father come back; the opening of the will on 31 March has nothing to do with the Wrights. Dated only 16 March but reference to the will makes it 1854.

16 Mar [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/17

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

28 Jun 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/18

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated 17 Nov, but 1854 has been added in pencil

17 Nov [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/19

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated 21 June, but 1855 has been added in pencil. Paper black-edged.

21 Jun [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/31/20

Letter from Henrietta W. Wright to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

9 Jul 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/32

Letters from the Wright cousins to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/32/1

Letter from Arthur Wright to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

22 Oct 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/32/2

Letter from Richard F. Wright to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

31 Mar 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/33

Letters from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1838-1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/33/1

Letter from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Pressures of a large family have prevented her writing before; thanks for her last letter; good that she is able to correspond with her maternal relatives, whom she knew so little before her departure; concerns about her health, with Lady Franklin having added at the end of Eleanor's letter that Eleanor is very stout, needing exercise; congratulations on the marriage of Mary Franklin and Mr Price; remembrance to Sophia Cracroft, not mentioned in her letter; receipt of letters from cousin Henry [Kay], anxious for promotion; glad that Sir John escaped so well in the overturn of the wagon with...

19-24 Dec 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/33/2

Letter from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Not able to visit today but asks if Eleanor and Mr Gell will dine there tomorrow; had asked a respectable cab driver called Burgess to leave his ticket at the Gells; she has heard from officials at St John's that they will be resident from Sunday, with Gell preaching in the afternoon.

16 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/33/3

Letter from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for trouble taken but she has got a cook who came last week and "we should not like to have a woman of colour about us, as our servant in that place is a good deal seen"; she wishes she had been told how Lady Simpkinson was, even though Emily had been to Christ's Hospital; alarm for Mary Anne over Franklin, who had a fever attack attended by delirium but was better now if weak and unable to leave his bed; Mary Kendall was also ill and gone to friends in Southampton for change of air and to be watched by their medical friend.

16 Nov 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/34

Letters from cousin Mary Anne Kendall nee Kay to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Mary Anne Kendall (1808-1869) was the eldest daughter of Joseph Kay and his wife Sarah Henrietta (nee Porden) and the niece of Sir John Franklin and his first wife Eleanor Anne (nee Porden); she married Edward Nicholas Kendall on 8 May 1832 at St Alphage's Church, Greenwich, Kent; they had 4 children: Mary Anne (died 1858), Edward Kay (1833-1894), Franklin Richardson (1839-1907) and Robert Sinclair (died 1841).

1847-1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/1

Letter (possibly incomplete) from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on trying to contact people with regard to Franklin's expedition and Christmas arrangements

Has not written until she has had chance to speak to Mr [?]Burne; he does not think it can be [?call for sermon or national prayers], though the expedition is a “national thing” because there are other equally dangerous expeditions going on, such as "Caffre War" [in South Africa]; will ask some other people as soon as gets the chance; is not optimistic; wants Eleanor to inform her if she has any success with Mr Villiers; will mention it to Mr Walpole; difficult to get to speak to people at Christmas; arrangements for staying in a hotel, prices for apartments, prices for board, a lot of...

27 Dec 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/2

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on Mary Ann's money worries and hopes and prayers for Franklin's expedition

Has been meaning to write for a long time; anxieties about money; Mama is unable to send any money; had been hoping that uncle would lend her some to tide her over; has been more difficult over the Christmas quarter; recovering from a long illness; trusts that God will provide for widows and fatherless children; apologies for telling Eleanor about her money worries; Eleanor’s proposed visit; may not be time because Eleanor seeing the Richardsons as well; will be in London again in March because Franklin going to Christ’s Hospital School; so much to say to Eleanor; wants her to combine...

11 Jan 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/3

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, on her appointmemt as Matron of the Royal Naval Coillege in Portsmouth and news on her son Franklin Kendall

Has been appointed Matron of Royal Naval College in Portsmouth Docks; offered appointment by Captain Eden; appointed because she was the “widow of an old polar officer who had done good service and a niece of Sir J. Franklin” and having “peculiar claims upon the Govt. at this moment”; salary of £70 with 3 rooms, no coal allowance but coals will be supplied, and 30 candles per month; has been very occupied with Fn [Franklin Kendall] since his return; will speak to Eleanor in confidence when in town; in confidence for the sake of the boy; Sir E. and Mr Walpole have both urged caution; wants...

31 Jul 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/4

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, including reference to Eleanor's perseverance in dispute [with Lady Franklin]; with envelope

Thanks for “most interesting” letter; Sir J.R. gave thanks at Alverstoke; writer does not know how the one outstanding matter will be achieved; Richardsons going to town; apologies to Eleanor, did not mean to suggest that Eleanor had not made any efforts towards reconciliation; urges Eleanor to be conciliatory and forebearing, will need to be persistent; example of the “Franklin stumpiness” of character; writer’s “high sense of duty”; hopes God will guide any steps which need to be taken.

Letter dated only Sunday; 11 Nov 1849 has been added in pencil. Envelope postmarked 18 Nov 1849 and...

11 Nov 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/5

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, including on her isolation due to smallpox outbreak, her financial worrries , the education of her sons Franklin and Edward, death of Aunt Betsey Franklin and on the impending search expedition of H.M.S. Plover

Thanks to Eleanor’s husband for his kindness towards “our little Blue” [Franklin at Christ’s Hospital School]; will not be back in her own home until Saturday; hopes that she will be “more settled”; smallpox outbreak when staying at the home of a friend, so Mrs Gambier has taken her in; everyone else is keeping away from the writer through fear; had been due to go to the Parry’s for a “charade and tableaux” party, but they are shunning her; so she has had time to write this letter; does not think that she is infectious as she had not been near the patient; she does, however, have a bad...

17 Jan 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/6

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, including information on a number of the search expeditions looking for Sir John Franklin

Sorry that Eleanor did not call to see her en route to Winchester; circumstances mitigated against it; Captains Austin and Ommanney are still in town because the Committee of Enquiry is still sitting; has told Captain Pullen that Eleanor would be pleased to see him if he has time; hoping to see Mr Hooper who is taking command of the ‘Excellent’; Captain Chads has said “they must send another expedition, the press are so violent”; wants Eleanor to stay with them next time rather than at "the George" as they are near the trains; love to Mrs [Isabella] Cracroft and Catherine; she sent a litle...

21 Oct 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/7

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to the family's decision to mourn Sir John Franklin, including reference to his will

Plans have changed; Josephine not visiting as intended, problems with her shoulder; the Rices and other friends will also be disappointed; hoping to see Eleanor when comes to London; has business to conduct relating to her sons; hopes to see Henry and to dine with Mama; everything Eleanor has told her about the will was news to her; had acted in accordance with the decision made by the Booths and had bought some things for Mary K. , but will now act according to the decision made by the wider family; “Poor dear Uncle Franklin! That best of all men”; now in heaven; mourning him; “many...

22 Mar 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/8

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, on confirmation of news of the fate of Franklin's expeditions by Dr John Rae

Scarcely knows what to write but does not want to be silent about confirmation of their “worst fears”; Sir J. Richardson takes comfort in the fact that Eleanor’s father died early on, “before the ships were deserted”; could not bring herself to write to Eleanor for a few days after hearing of Dr Rae returning; acknowledges that it is not a “new sorrow”, but reading each line creates a “new pang – and I dare not trust myself to dwell upon it”; glad to hear that Eleanor is well and has been able to “nurse your baby”; arrangements for forwarding post; kind of Mr Gell to write to her; hopes...

28 Oct 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/9

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, including on hearing of Eleanor's reconciliation with Lady Franklin

Refers to Eleanor’s pressing concerns; illness of Eleanor’s baby was hardly surprising when Eleanor was anxious herself whilst nursing and weaning the baby; very pleased to hear of Eleanor’s reconciliation with Lady F.; has not heard from Lady F. directly; only via Maria and via Eleanor’s note; glad that writer’s sisters will be able to help Eleanor in her “new sphere of labour”; Eleanor’s “new responsibilities” eased because “suspense had become certainty”; Franklin home from school because of scarlet fever; think about one subject all the time; reading “the Times” to the exclusion of...

29 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/10

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to the arrangements for the marriage of Mary Anne's daughter [also called Mary Anne]

Arrangements for daughter’s wedding; Eleanor’s offer of accommodation for guests; Maria not having the wedding breakfast at her house; arrangements for refreshments; Eleanor and Mrs Booth may be able to assist with accommodation; arrangements for transport; Sir John R. [Richardson] intends to come to the wedding; no objection to Eleanor being in “slight mourning”; discussion of bonnets; Mrs [Isabella] Cracroft, Catherine, and son-in-law to be, Mr Sage, have visited.

20 Apr 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/11

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to Mary Anne's son's education prospects and news of the Parry family

Mr Gell’s kind offer to take F. [her son Franklin Kendall] out; awaiting news from Scotland before coming to town to see Mr Allan; F. has failed to become a “Grecian” [at Christ’s Hospital School], for which she blames Mr White; F. would have succeeded if Dr Rice [headmaster of Christ's Hospital School, Horsham, Sussex] had not died and if Dr Jacob had not been seriously ill; Parrys are settled at Tunbridge Wells; little interest in the press about Sir Edward's [Parry] funeral; Captain Austin and Sir George Back attended; Lady Parry’s income is £900 per year plus possible use of daughter’s...

13 Sep [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/34/12

Letter from Mary Anne Kendall to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, mainly on the employment prospects for her son, Edward

Edward wanting to be elected to King Edward School, Birmingham; he is wanted to stand for Glenalmond [college in Perth, Scotland] if not elected to Birmingham; he did not get Westminster because he was not a public school man; only wants to tutor privately on a temporary basis; thanks to Eleanor for suggesting someone; Edward visiting the Fosters; Edward appreciates being amongst intelligent and intellectual people; Josephine’s illness; Sir John Richardson keeping visitors away; letters to Josephine; clinging to life; wrong not to be prayed with; Edward wants employment leading to Holy...

19 Jul [1856]

D8760/F/FEG/1/35

Letters from Mary Anne Mantell to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/35/1

Letter from Mary Anne Mantell to her cousin Eleanor Gell

She was told by Mama that she would like to hear from her; she has not written to her before, but she remembers her; their lot "in this strange land" has been better than others in India

17 Sep 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/36

Letters to Eleanor Isabella Gell from cousins in the Kay family

 

1838-1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/36/1

Letter from Sarah Frances Kay to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Including references to the severe weather, [Eleanor] Franklin still being at Boulogne and in better health, nephew Eddy having broken his thigh, little niece being with them causing great amusement.

10 Mar 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/36/2

Letter from Sarah Frances Kay to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Including reference to seening the royal procession for the coronation of Queen Victoria, who looked "very amiable and gracious". Letter head has an engraving of the Abbey Church and Guildhall, Bath. Marked as having arrived 16 Dec and been delivered 23 Dec.

28 Jul 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/36/3

Letter from Eleanor Franklin Kay to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks for letter sent 8 Feb and received on Eleanor's birthday; assorted family news; comments on paintings seen at the Royal Academy

7 Jun 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/36/4

Letter from cousins Sarah Frances and Eleanor Franklin Kay to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Discrete text from each writer, both started 9 Feb. From Eleanor Frances Kay: fearful that her letters are a poor response to those received.  Gives news of Ellen's convalescence and of the health of other family members in the context of warm winter weather.  Describes time spent in Southamption in the company of her sister Mary Anne: mentions children Eddy, Mary Anne and Franklin.   Describes Kendall's work, with details of ships and their routes.  Commends "Introduction to the Literature of Modern Europe in 15th, 16th & 17th Centuries" by Hallam.  At William's request they are making...

9-18 Feb 1843

D8760/F/FEG/1/36/5

Letter from Sarah Frances Kay to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Not having heard from Lady Franklin and Eleanor since they went to Harrow; aunt Kay being ill and unable to leave her bed; Eleanor being about to go Alverstoke to see Mary Anne [Kendall]; the pleasure of having Eleanor's company over the winter; wanting to know about the Plover, which had been delayed due to its leakiness [it left England in Jan 1848;Settling the affairs of her father after his death [Joseph Kay]. Letter undated, but "?1847" added in pencil, but 1848 more likely as the year. Paper black-edged.

[1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/36/6

Letter from Ellen Lydia Kay to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, including references to the murder of John Price

Had not known of Eleanor's whereabouts until Godfrey had told them she had gone northwards and Mrs Long said she was in [?]Snathpethers hope she and Mr Gell had been able to leave Edinburgh after Mary's recovery; asking for news of Mrs Price, having got accounts from both of the writer's brothers, William and Henry, of Mr Price's murder, with injunction from Frances to let her know; expectation reported that Mrs Price will get a pension from the Victorian Government and that she has property settled on her and her children for £2000. There has been little printed on the expeditions due to...

31 Aug 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/37

Letters from John Griffin, father of Lady Franklin, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1840-[c1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/37/1

Letter from John Griffin to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Receipt of her letter of 29 Oct, with its entertaining account fo improvements over which her father presides; with natural history being her favourite amusment, he asks her why there is such mortality among the monkeys in the Zoological Gardens (over 60 dead with scarcely one left); visit of Prince Albert to their Hall, a handsome and elegant young man, fit to be a prince; it is possible John may make his appearance at court and kiss the Queen's hand; he is glad Eleanor is busy in her studies, with time never hanging heavy on her hands, having the advantage of being under the tuition of...

9 Mar 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/37/2

Letter from John Griffin to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Receipt of letter at Tunbridge where they are staying until the middle of the month, with Emma being unwell; last August they made another tour in Germany, visiting the baths and returning home by Antwerp; glad to hear her Mama has returned safely from her perils and privations; thanks for account of the New College, for which he wishes success.

2 Nov 1842

D8760/F/FEG/1/37/3

Letter from John Griffin, father of Lady Franklin, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

He should have accepted her invitation for tomorow, but he has made arrangements to go to Windsor and shall return in the evening, too late to join her party. Only dated Thursday.

[c1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/38

Letters between Frances Majendie and her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1847-1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/38/1

Letter from Frances Majendie to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Relating to issues about Roman Catholicism from reading book identifed as being Miss Harris. The letter is dated only Wednessday, but the envelope is postmarked as Halstead for 8 Dec 1847: the enevelope is also marked "From Oxford to Rome" [which was written by Elizabeth F.S. Harris].

8 Dec 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/38/2

Letter from Frances Majendie to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Glad to hear her marriage is to take place speedily. Envelope postamrked for Winchester.

1 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/38/3

Letter from Frances Majendie to her niece Eleanor Isabella Gell, reproving her for calling Lady Franklin "slightly deranged", with envelope

Taking exception to Eleanor calling her mother-in-law "slightly deranged for the last 3 months"; she herself have never seen Lady Franklin so calm, considering how her hopes have been torn down by friends; she urges Eleanor to be more cautious in how she expresses herself; the immediate cause of the dispute is a picture of Eleanor's father which does not belong to her; if she hears such a repetition of such expressions she will take appropriate measures. Envelope postmarked for Halstead 11 July 1849.

11 Jul 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/38/4

Draft of letter from Eleanor Isabella Gell to her aunt Frances Majendie

With several crossings out and pencil inserts. On Lady Franklin being calm, including reference to picture of Sir John Franklin. Identified as being in response to a letter from F. Majendie about the picture, relating to "the disappointment is of my own causing"

Jul 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/39

Letters from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

1832-1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/1

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

She has not written for some time, or heard from Eleanor, but hopes she has not forgotten her and still thinks of her with affection. Lady Jane loves Eleanor very much and writes about her in her letters. Lady Jane and Sir John are in Malta, Frank Simpkinson has gone to Malta too, although he is not on HMS Rainbow but on HMS Britannia. Sir John's friend Captain Rideout asks about her when she sees him. She would like to see Eleanor as it is nearly 2 years since she went away. She has a good account of her from Aunt Franklin. Uncle Simpkinson and Grandpapa send love. She is sending a book...

20 Jun [1832]

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/2

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Sir John will be going to see Eleanor, she is sure Eleanor will be delighted to see him after an absence of three years. Reassures Eleanor how much her father loves her, and that he thinks of her daily. Lady Jane also loves her, and writes about Eleanor in her letters. Cousins Marianne and Emma often talk of Eleanor, and would like to see her again. Marianne has now gone to school, Eleanor is having lessons at home with the Cracroft girls. Sends love to all the Cracrofts. Eleanor is to tell Mrs Cracroft that Mrs Beaufort was enquiring after her. Mrs Beaufort is very ill.

Letter only dated...

[1834]

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/3

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

She often thinks of Eleanor with affection and great interest. She is glad to hear that she is improving in knowledge and accomplishments as well as aspects of her character. She would like Eleanor to write to her about Van Diemans Land, with a view of Government House, and information about the rooms and who they belong to. Sends kind regards to Miss Williamson and love to Mary Franklin, asks to be remembered to Mrs Cracroft.

11 Oct 1837

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/4

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Has heard from Mr Gairdner at the Colonial Office that a ship is due to sail to Hobart Town (taking Mr Forster, brother of the present Colonial Secretary), so is writing quickly to reply to Eleanor's letter. Lady Jane has written to introduce Mr and Mrs James Grant, she does not recall the name among the many others Lady Jane has enumerated. Captain and Mrs Montagu are to leave England in the middle of October, but are reluctant to do so. He has a very aged mother he is unlikley to see again, and Mrs Montagu is wretched at the thought of leaving her boys. Aut Simpkinson is going to Germany...

24 Jul 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/5

First page of letter from Eleanor Franklin to her aunt Lady Mary Simpkinson

Acknowledging letter of 24 July; identified as Lady Simpkinson by reference to receipt of letter of 24 July and references to her daughters Emma and Marianne. Includes description of the Hobart Regatta.

4 Dec 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/6

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks Eleanor for the interesting account in her last letter of the foundation of the new college, and the Regatta day. Refers to the long visit of Captain Ross and Crozier, and how Eleanor must have felt when they departed on their adventurous and perilous expedition, but she is confident they will return safely. Writes about a mimosa plant which Mr Stephen Archer gave her, her sister has been looking after it for her but it is not flourishing. She has asked Lady Jane to send her a pair of green birds, she had some which were a kind of parakeet, which he (?) brought back with him last...

24 Jul 1841

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/7

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin

She thanks Eleanor for her long interesting letter, and that from Lady Jane, which gave a comprehensive and lively account of the expedition to Macquarie Harbour. She has shared them with other people, and been asked why she does not publish the account. She is writing at the last minute, having already sent packets by the Archdeacon. She has heard news that Sir John has been ordered to return, the news has come officially from Lord Stanley. Ever since hearing the news she has been busy letting family members and immediate friends know. Everybody is looking forward to seeing them all again...

20 Feb 1843

D8760/F/FEG/1/39/8

Letter from Lady Mary Simpkinson to her niece Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Marianne brought down yesterday the news that Mr Gell was in possession of the promise (but nothing more) of the District Church in Marylebone; Mary congratulates both of them; Marianne has also told her that they have taken a house in Upper Seymour Street, Portman Square, which sounds very grand, but Eleanor must know what she can afford. She cannot write herself as one of her fingers on her right hand tied up with a poultice. She is in posession of the house, as her sister and Mr. M. went off to Boulogne yesterday until 1 September; she will not stya long, but will set off for North Wales...

9 Aug 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/40

Letters from Sir Francis Simpkinson, brother-in-law of Lady Jane Franklin, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

[c1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/40/1

Letter from Sir Francis Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Concerning unsuitability of office mentioned by Eleanor for John Gell, as it would mean he could not continue his curacy, he would have to preach every Sunday morning out of term and the salary is only £100 a year . Only dated Friday.

[c1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/41

Letters from John Nassau Simpkinson to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

[1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/41/1

Letter from John Nassau Simpkinson to his cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Obliged for getting letter from her on her improved relations with her aunt, having made friends; she is welcome to have any right of ownership he might possess to the pedestal of the Cupid; when in London in a fortnight hoping to find her settled in their new home in B.[Bedford] Place, a great improvement on Seymour Street; views on the siege of Sebastopol. Only dated 4 Dec, but 1854 added in pencil, which fits context of letter

4 Dec [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42

Letters from Sarah Dorothea (known as Dora) Simpkinson nee Vaughan, wife of John Nassau Simpkinson, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1851-1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/1

Letter from Dorothea Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Saturday night 16 Feb, which fits with the year 1851

16 Feb [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/2

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Gell

Only dated Friday 20 June; 1851 added in pencil

20 Jun [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/3

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 8 Feb, but 1854 added in pencil.

8 Feb [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/4

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Will be dining tomorrow at 5.30; the pony carriage will be meet her at 4 o'clock. Glad to see her and her husband but sad without her darling; they seem to miss her more than ever, with the house so dull. Only dated Monday night. Paper black-edged.

[c1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/5

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Sending Eleanor some pictures for her little girl to help with teaching her; she will be better taught than she could with them; thanks to husband for note. Only dated Saturday morning. Paper black-edged.

[c1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/6

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 29 Sep: 1856 added in pencil.

29 Sep [1856]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/7

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Not tempted by what Eleanor has written about their servants; they need a more active servant to be cook for a country clergyman' s house. Her sister is still in much the same state, with little hope of her getting better. Only dated 15 Jan but context of her sister's serious illness makes the year 1857.

15 Jan [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/42/8

Letter from Dora Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for sympathy for death of her sister, which Eleanor heard about through Emma and Louisa; her complaint was consumption. Paper black-edged. Dated Tuesday 10 March [Dora's sister Lucy Agnes Vaughan died on 3 Mar 1857]

10 Mar [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43

Letters from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1842-1858

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/1

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

11 Jul 1842

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/2

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

2 Nov 1842

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/3

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

21 Dec 1845

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/4

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

11 Jan 1846

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/5

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Only dated Thursday 17 Feb, which fits with the calendar of 1848

17 Feb [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/6

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Only dated 22 Feb; no year given. Addressed to E [or C]; reference to appointment of the Bishop of Chester could refer to the promotion of Bishop Sumner to the Archbishopric of Canterbury which was confirmed in March 1848.

22 Feb [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/7

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Only dated Thursday morning: "?1849" added in pencil at top

[1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/8

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

On Eleanor not having written to Lady Franklin; an American Mr Burrowes [Silas E Burrows] having called on Lady Franklin, bearing letters from the President, the Empress of Russia, the King of Sweden, etc, being a merchant at York and having the disposal of a large amount of money and a great interest in Sir John Franklin, offering his ervices, even to fit out an expedition. Only dated Thursday, but visit by Burrows places it as most likely in May or June 1849

[May 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/9

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to J. Ross's ships being in readiness to set sail again for the north at the beginning of next year; asking whether the expedition to Behrings Strait has been agreed upon. Only dated 13 Nov, but 1849 added in pencil.

13 Nov [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/10

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

On her arrangements before coming to see her; Emma and Marianne not going to John's wedding on account of expense, with changing their minds making it look strange to the Vaughans; fears Sophy Cracroft will be with them all winter. Only dated Saturday; 1850 has been added in pencil, but reference to wedding of John Simpkinson to Dora Vaughan makes it likely to be late in 1849

[Nov 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/11

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Description of the marriage of John N. Simpkinson and Dora Vaughan; the wedding to be at St Martin's a quarter of a mile from there, with Mrs Vaughan's husband previously the vicar of St Martin's. Only dated 7 Dec, but the marriage is known to have taken place on 6 Dec 1849.

7 Dec [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/12

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Thursday: 1850 added in pencil at top; with brief postcript by M.J.S. [Marian Simpkinson]

[1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/13

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Monday: 1850 added in pencil at top.

[1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/14

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Wednesday night; year 1852 has been added in pencil

[1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/15

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Friday and signed EJS, includes references to Marianne becoming a Catholic, Cecille, the writer's Mama lacking affection

[1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/16

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Not dated in original, but 4 Jan 1853 has been added in pencil

[4 Jan 1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/17

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to unhappiness about Emma C's marriage. Only dated 6 Nov; 1853 added in pencil

6 Nov [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/18

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 25 July; "?1854" added in pencil

25 Jul [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/19

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Friday; 10 Nov 1854 added in pencil

10 Nov [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/20

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 2 Aug; year 1857 added in pencil

2 Aug [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/21

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 28 Aug; year 1857 added in pencil

28 Aug [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/22

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell with envelope

Only dated 18 Aug; "1858?" added in pencil. Envelope postmarked for several places: Hedingham Saxmundham, Yoxford, Jersey and London

18 Aug [1858]

D8760/F/FEG/1/43/23

Letter from Emma Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 7 Sep; 1858 added in pencil

7 Sep [1858]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44

Letters from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

[c1830-1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/1

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Undated; handwriting that of a young child; mainly references to dolls

[c1830]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/2

Letter from Marianne J. Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Presenting her with a little book written by herself, hoping she will make allowances for her youth. Mama took her to see giraffes yesterday and fed the elephant, giving it a bun at a time. When Aunt Franklin writes to Mama, Eleanor must also write to Marianne sometimes; her Mama says that she feels very dull without Aunt Franklin. The bottom of the letter has been cut away, so little of the signature remains.

13 Aug 1836

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/2/a

Manuscript prose work entitled "The Stage Coach" [by Marianne Simpkinson]

13 pages, plus dedication page to Miss E.I.Franklin, preface page and title page "The Stage Coach by the Author of the Amusement, London, published by J. Murray, 1836 "

1836

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/2/b

Manuscript prose work entitled "Laura" [by Marianne Simpkinson]

33 pages, including dedication page to Miss E.I.Franklin, preface pages and title page "The Stage Coach or Laura by the Author of the Visit to Jersey; Published by J. Murray, MDCCCXXXVI"

Jul 1836

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/3

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

16 Mar 1838

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/4

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

11 Feb 1843

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/5

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Marianne is sending her a line or two to thank her for letter, as she would not like Eleanor to think she did not feel for her in her distress; relating to the arrival of Sir James Ross, Eleanor's account of the reason of his return and the sufferings he has undergone has made Marianne think that he was justified; at first she had thought it was precipitate to return and that he should have stayed another year, but her opinion has been changed; she hopes the Government will be induced to send another ship to the Bering Straits, but is afraid that her Aunt will do a great deal of mischief...

[late 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/6

Letter, with envelope, from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Marian and Frank shall be happy to dine with Eleanor tomorrow. She is sorry Eleanor will not come to them tomorrow, as she does not admit the validity of the reasons she gives; she is sure Aunt F. would prefer Eleanor to stay away, but "what has she got to do with it?"; the house is not hers nor she its mistress, and Eleanor's not coming acknowledges Aunt F. has a right to ask or exclude, which Marianne denies she has; her staying in Bedford Place for months while they were away and asking people to stay with her, all at Marian's grandfather's expense is so very mean and disgusting that she...

[7 Nov 1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/7

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to hearing thenews that the "Prince Albert" is going out again under Mr Kennedy or Kenaway. Only dated Thursday, but reference to Kennedy makes it 1851 .

[1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/8

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, concerning Marianne's conversion to Catholicism

Asks her to dine next Tuesday 29th, with the [?]Mauniers and the Fredrick Youngs; Jane and Emma to dine with Eleanor on the Thursday; Jane has told Eleanor of Marian's determination, which would not have surpised her; Marian has delayed too long already; she is sure Eleanor will not distress her by talking against Catholicism; she does not pretend that they are of one mind; Marian, like Miss Stanley, does not feel any bitterness or intolerance towards anyone whatever their opininons; it will not be her fault if a bar is put between her and her friends; she hopes to live in peace with all...

[1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/9

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

She asks Eleanor to bring Edward with her on Tuesday to make 12 at dinner; thanks Eleanor for her note and her kindness and sympathy; some people treat her as if she were guilty of a very great crime; she is glad she had the courage to openly join the church which she believed to be the true one [the Roman Catholic church] and where her sympathies had been for a long time; she feels she has left darkness for light; she assures her she [Marian] is not bigoted or intolerant, and prays she will not be so in the future; she has acted conscientiously and done what she believes to be right...

[1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/10

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Marian says she was sorry not to see her when she was in London; Eleanor must have felt the new brought home from Captain Inglefield very deeply; she supposes Eleanor heard him tell the news, which could hardly have been more than appeared in the newspaper; she asks whether Lady F. has had any communication with her and still deteremined to have nothing to do with her. Emma is now reconciled with her sister on condition they never speak about the family. Frank is going to Italy for two or three months. She is concerned about John and Dora, with a worry about John becoming ill. She is...

21 Oct [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/11

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Having received letter from Lady Franklin written on 9 Oct, being in Scotland with Sophy, with two possible plans, to stay in Edinburgh to see Captain Kerr or to go to Derry, where Sir E. Parry is staying; her aunt has received a note from Eleanor, written in a tone which was by no means pleasant, which Marain regards as a pity; further updates on the movements of Lady Franklin and Sophy (leaving Kirkwall 5 Oct, going on a steamer to see the northern lights but disappointed, putting into Aberdeen, going off to Peterhead). PS on Captain Hamilton saying that the Admiralty was more...

[Oct 1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/12

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 2 Oct; 1857 added in pencil

2 Oct [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/13

Letter from Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Letter only dated Sunday evening [11 Oct]; envelope has continuation of last few lines inside, postmark for 12 Oct 57 on outside

11-12 Oct 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/44/14

Part of letter possibly by Marianne Jane Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Handwriting not absolutely clearly that of Marianne Simpkinson; references to Essex gentlemen fearing overturn of the Protestant religion and establishment of Popery in England; the celebrated Roland Winn is to visit with cousin tomorrow; life dismal when one cannot be out of doors; there is a certain panic, people being called imps and heathens, quite a scandal in the village at Hedingham; aunt M. inclined to be very kind, but subject ot fits of misery and irritation; there is a great cry about bad times and ruin, they are all going to be starved this winter; thet went to the great...

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/45

Letters from cousin Mary Louisa Dixon nee Simpkinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

1849-1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/45/1

Letter from Mary Louisa Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Friday; 23 Aug 1849 has been added in pencil

23 Aug 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/45/2

Letter from Mary Louisa Simpkinson to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including references to arrangements on insurance and the sad Australian news of the Gells [in pencil Arthur Gell lost at sea]

[1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/45/3

Letter from Mary Louisa Dixon to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, on her not meeting up due to the terrifying journey which she was unable to complete

Apology for not coming to hers, but the journey was so terrifying with the complete darkness along the Bayswater Road and shouts and screams of the people that they were forced to turn back; hope that the Gurneys were able to make their journey without accident; her disappointment at not being able to make it; thankful for safe return home, with the coachman confessing he did not know where he was, going on the pavement twice.

Only dated Wednesday evening, but 8 Feb 1854 has been added in pencil at top.

Paper black-edged.

8 Feb [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/45/4

Letter from Mary Louisa Dixon to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell, deploring Eleanor's unreasonableness with regard to the settlement of Sir John Franklin's estate and urging her to accept Lady Franklin's generous offer

She saw Lady Franklin yesterday and heard strong letter to Eleanor, which wil probably make her angry; Mary Louisa agrees with Lady Franklin's points as justified; she cannot think why Eleanor can ask for her father's private journals and papers, mostly addressed to his wife; Lady Franklin has already spent money copying some of them for her; Eleanor is wrong to say everything has been left her by the will except for plate, furniture etc; the rest has to be turned by Sellwood into money; Eleanor's demands are unreasonable. Lady Franklin will leave most papers and articles to Eleanor, but...

11 Aug [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/45/5

Letter (seemingly incomplete) from Mary Louisa Dixon to her cousin Eleanor Gell, mainly about terms of settlement with Lady Franklin regarding the estate of Sir John Franklin

Proposal of arrangements to meet up following change of plans by the Dysters; she would like to see Captain Collinson; ships the Eskimaux saw must be Eleanor's father's; comments on the purchases and proerty investements in Van Diemen's Land and Australia, and the financial worth of Franklin's estate; she states that she can not imagine a more liberal offer made by Lady Franklin or expected by Eleanor, offering to resign all her life interest and taking away all risk from Eleanor by turning it into money, as long as Lady Franklin was allowed quiet possession of all that was morally and...

[1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/45/6

Letter from Mary Louisa Dixon to her cousin Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 27 July; 1856 added in pencil

27 Jul [1856]

D8760/F/FEG/1/46

Letters from James Dixon, husband of Marl Louisa Dixon nee Simpkinson, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

[c1859]

D8760/F/FEG/1/46/1

Letter from James Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

In his capacity as a doctor, relating to improvement in eye of her daughter Alice [born late 1857], trying to alleviate her concerns about a white speck (previously covered by the redness of the inflammation), which grow paler and less visible in time; there will always be something to mark the site of the ulcer; iron drops must be carried on with for another fortnight. Only dated Saturday.

[c1859]

D8760/F/FEG/1/46/2

Letter from James Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

In his capacity as a doctor, giving instructions for the destruction of lice infecting a child's head using the "white precipitate of mercury ointment", which may cause the child to be distressed and purged if rubbed in too abundantly. He does not think he will be able to help with the "medical pupils", as he he is not connected with King's College. Only dated Saturday evening.

[c1859]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47

Letters from Anna M. Dixon, sister of husband of Mary Louisa Dixon nee Simpkinson, to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1848-1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/1

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Letter only dated 6 Feb, but 1848 has been added in pencil.

6 Feb [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/2

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

5 Jun 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/3

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Letter only dated 24 July, but 1848 has been added in pencil.

24 Jul [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/4

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

 

14 Oct 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/5

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Playful letter, with fake court report of proceedings in important trial in London, Franklin versus Dixon, outlining why Anna has not called on Eleanor in her lodgings at Charlotte Street, with apologies. Only dated Wednesday evening.

[c1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/6

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

References to intention to attend Mr Gell's Missionary lecture and prayers for the expeditions. Only dated Saturday, but 1849 has been added in pencil.

[1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/7

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Reference to election of Mr Goulbourn as Headmaster; Anna imagines that there are many positions which will be more gratifying to Eleanor than being a headmaster's wife. Letter only dated Tuesday; "?1850" has been added in pencil, but reference to appointment of Meyrick Goulbourn as Headmaster of Rugby School, appointed Dec 1849, means it is probably 1849

[Dec 1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/8

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to baptism of Eleanor's son next day. Letter only dated 3 June, but 1851 added in pencil, which tallies with date of baptism.

3 Jun [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/9

Letter from Anna M. Dixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including references to Sir John Ross's return and Esquimaux reports, and how the news of no tidings will affect Eleanor. Letter not dated, but 1851 has been added in pencil at top

[1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/47/10

Letter from Anna M. Dixon, to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Dated 26 Nov, but 1853 added in pencil

26 Nov [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/48

Letters from the Guillemard family to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1847-1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/48/1

Letter from J.S. Guillemard to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Including references to accusations by a German woman against Sophy Cracroft. Dated only 19 April, but "1847?" added in pencil

19 Apr [1847]

D8760/F/FEG/1/48/2

Letter from W.H. Guillemard to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks for her enclosing letters relating to issues concerning Roman Catholicism [sent to her by Elizabeth F.S. Harris]. Letter only dated 20 Dec, but 1847 has beena added in pencil

20 Dec [1847]

D8760/F/FEG/1/48/3

Letter from J.S. Guillemard to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Hoping to re-arrange date for Eleanor to visit him and his sister; also including references to Mr Gell and the college and Van Diemen's Land; best wishes to Lady Franklin; concerns on aunt Simpkinson's health; hope that Eleanor will enjoy Clifton. Only dated Thursday; "1847 or 8" added in pencil

[1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/48/4

Letter from Louisa E. Guillemard to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks for note; reference to the anxiety felt by Eleanor for Sir John and the troubled times they live in. Only dated 14 March, but "1848 or 9" added in pencil; reference to Louisa's two girls and her baby suggest it may perhaps have been 1849.

14 Mar [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/48/5

Letter from J.S. Guillemard to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for her kind thought relating to future curate for James, much pleased at the idea of Archibald Marriott, who will no doubt send his answer to Guillemard's cousin; he is going with two of the children to stay with his brother. He feels for Eleanor over the offical notification of her father's death; reference to the journal of Captain Gardiner bearing out her father's own experience many years ago [relating to starvation of crew on Falkland Islands in 1851]

25 Feb 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/49

Letters from the Beaufort family to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1848-1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/1

Letter from Emily A. Beaufort to her friend Eleanor Isabella Franklin

On receipt of letter from Eleanor enclosing letter about the struggles of a young woman [Miss Harris] concerning Roman Catholicism, with lengthy comments on her situation; references to her father's approval of Lady Simpkinson's writing to Lord Auckland, her father's amazement at Eleanor having sent a letter by the Plover; and Maconochies dining with the Beauforts and Marianne. At the top "Lady Strangford" has been added in pencil

10 Jan 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/2

Letter from Emily A. Beaufort to her friend Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Friday evening. Thanks for her letter and kind expressions; hopes to talk to her soon rather than only through letters; references to Eleanor being with Louisa, hearing from Lady Gardiner about the start of the voyage of the Bishop [Nixon] from England to Tasmania, and to reading Rest in the Church by Miss H. [Harris]. At the top "Lady Strangford" has been added in pencil.

21 Jan 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/3

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including congratulating her on the good news which came to them by the "Electric Telegraph", her father being overpowered with happiness, the news being that "Sir John Franklin and Sir James Ross's ships frozen in Prince Regent's Inlet. Believe all safe. This got from the Natives. Will send further particulars by post."

4 Oct 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/4

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On her father still having no doubts about the story concerning the ships from the natives but having no belief in clairvoyance. Asks whether Sir Francis Simpkinson has any influence or interest at Gray's Inn in the appointment of a morning preacher there, and if so, whether Eleanor could ask if he would have any [influence] for her brother Augustus, anxious to become a candidate, now that the death of the Bishop of Norwich has meant a blow to hopes of preferment

6 Oct 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/5

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with slip of paper sent up with an experimental balloon to be forwarded to the Admiralty by post

Sending her the first three volumes of Archdeacon Manning's sermons; her father's response not discouraging Eleanor from writing to thank Sir James Baring; also sending her one of the papers her father brought home from one of the trial balloons sent off that day from the Admiralty, which failed and came down in three hours in Rotherhithe instead of a fortnight's time in Germany, so they had to pay the 3 guineas reward. The slip is dated 30 Jan 1850; the letter is only dated Thursday night, but the context makes it 31 Jan 1850.

30-31 Jan 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/6

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

On Eleanor not being able to meet her next evening; sympathising with her on her being lonely on her "first separation". Dated only Monday night

[c1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/7

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On the visit by one of Eleanor's cousins to the Rappists, who recount the story of the expedition ships having come in violent collision in a storm, with everyone lost

22 Jul 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/8

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Her disappointment on Marianne Healy not becoming a pupil teacher but going into domestic service instead as a result of her parents' decision; no need to contact Miss Bier of Nutford Place School. Reference to Sir Thomas Acland giving notice of a motion for tonight, asking for Lady Franklin's letter. Written Friday 17 March; no year given, with ?1849 added in pencil: calender dating and the reference to Lady Franklin's letter means the year is 1854.

17 Mar [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/9

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanking Eleanor for invitation to her house and telling her of her enjoyable stay with her father

3 Jul 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/10

Letter from Sir Francis Beaufort to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Envelope in handwriting of his daughter Rosamund, postmarked 24 Jan 1856,

23 Jan 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/11

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to congratulations to her father on discovery of the North West Passage; other brief references to Sir George Back, Captain M'Clure, Sir James Ross, sightings of the Erebus and Terror in 1851, and efforts at reconciliation between Eleanor and Lady Franklin

19 Oct 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/49/12

Letter from Rosamund E. Beaufort to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanking her for Eleanor's sympathy on death of her father; Lady Beaufort unconscious of her loss, not understanding when told about it twice. Paper black edged.

28 Dec 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/50

Letters from the Parry family to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1849-1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/1

Letter from William Parry to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, on his opposition to the proposal of Lady Franklin to set up her own private search expedition

Receipt of letter; had Lady Franklin already asked his advice about the idea of a private expedition, he would have endeavoured to dissuade her, not considering any advantage of it would be worth the immense sacrifice she would have to make; she did not tell him her proposal until her mind had been already made up; she complained that some family members were opposed to her plan; he also answered questions put by Mr Barrow [of the Admiralty]; his answers to Lady Franklin were intentionlly soothing, as she seemd to express herself as if almost everyone was against her. He answers 3 points of...

11 May 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/2

Letter from William Parry to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Enclosing a copy of his report; he did not answer her about the clairvoyante, but he was more occupied with the realities to give too much thought to what he believes mere delusion, which was the impression he got from the accounts of Miss Cracroft; everything was sent back to Miss Cracroft, so there is nothing he can give her, and he cannot recall the details of supposed revelations; he cannot remember whether Mr Majendie's paper came to him direct or from Miss C., but it was returned in a day or two; he saw Lady Franklin and Miss C. in Spring Gardens on Friday. PS. He has heard the sad...

5 Dec 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/3

Letter from William Parry to Eleanor Isabella Gell, relating to opinions on the various expeditions to be sent out in search of fer father

Relating to the timing of the expedition of Captain Austin, which was decided on too late; if anyone can get the ships about away before 1 May, it is Captain Austin; Richardson expects to hear from Rae in March or April; he has no knowledge of Sir John Ross's proposal, but thinks £3000 is a very small sum to be effective; he is sorry to find from Lady Franklin yesterday that she had not seen his report, secured by him from the Admiralty, and he hopes to send his own copy as soon as it is in his hands. PS: Sir John Richardson thinks it doubtful that the instructions to Commander Pullen to...

20 Feb 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/4

Letter from William Parry to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On his setting off to Southampton to give lecture on seamen and untrue report in The Times. Paper black edged.

19 Dec 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/5

Letter from Catherine Parry to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Black-edged paper

8 Apr 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/6

Letter from Catherine Parry to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Letter only dated 14 April; 1856 added in pencil, Envelope black-edged; dated postmark 15 Apr 1856.

14 Apr 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/7

Letter from Catharine Parry to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to son Edward completing the memoirs of his father. Paper black edged.

1 Dec 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/50/8

Autographs of William Parry cut out of letters, including one addressing Mrs Gell

 

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/51

Letters from members of the Ross family to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

1849-1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/51/1

Letter from Anne Ross to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

On the eve of Eleanor's marriage

6 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/51/2

Letter from Anne Ross to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Envelope postmarked for York 4 Oct 1849

4 Oct 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/51/3

Letter from Anne Ross to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including on her disappointment on not hearing news via the whalers from the ships of the expeditions

1 Nov 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/51/4

Letter from Sir James Ross to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Enclosing autograph of Captain Bird he can find; if not answering her purpose his address is York Buildings, Hastings

5 Dec 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/51/5

Letter from Sir James Ross to Eleanor Gell, with envelope

 

20 Mar 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/51/6

Letter from Anne Ross to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Her husband has to dine with Lord John Russell at Richmond tomorrow; she knows she and Mr Gell will excuse them under these circumstances. No date, "by 6 P.M. post".

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52

Letters from other correspondents to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell

 

[c1836-1858]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/1

Letter from Mary Arnold to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Congratulations on birth of daughter. Letter only dated 3 June, but envelope postmarked for 3 July 1850

3 Jun 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/2

Letter from Thomas Atkinson to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Letting her know infromation she asked for about the late Mrs Poindexter, who was obliged to Eleanor for her religious instruction and exhortations; she left two children, who were going to school in Baltimore and were amply provided for.

4 Mar 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/3

Letter from Lady Mary Jane Barrow to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Sympathy with her over her" double trials"

25 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/4

Letter from William Beechey to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with rough sketch map of position of ships in the Arctic

Hardly dares to congratulate her, although he fully expects the return of her father this autumn; he cannot quite understand the hydrography of the Esquimaux, making comments based on enclosed sheet; she is to tell Sir F. and Lady Simpkinson he participates in the happiness this rumour will occasion in them; he believes Lady Franklin is away. The letter is dated only 10 Oct, but ""/49" has been added in pencil.

10 Oct [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/5

Letter from J.H. Bradford to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

He remembers the pleasant hours spent with Lady Franklin and Eleanor; he examines the English newspapers for news of Sir John Franklin and hopes for his safe return; he refers to the death of their friend Mrs Poindexter, with a copy of letter written by Long on the day of her death at Baltimore on 2 Nov 1846

22 May 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/6

Letter from Charlotte Bruce to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Glad to hear of her arrival after travelling; they like Florence more and more, with reference to waiting for Miss Macintosh and it being too late to go the West Indies. Letter undated, but kept with letter to Eleanor from Julia Macintosh of 20 Oct 1847, on similar paper and ink

[Oct 1847]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/7

Letter from Julia Clark to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Apologies for not asking the Gells to visit before; she suggests sometime in the next few weeks; short description of what Merrow is like, including liking her clergyman personally but not the regime; reference to payment of £1 to Emma's expenses after request from Mrs Cocks, but refusing to do it again.

6 Nov 1857

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/8

Letter from Emily Collinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

In response to letter sent by Eleanor to congratulate her on the safety of her son in the Arctic seas; she had not responded before because the news had only been confirmed that morning in a letter from son Richard dated 21 Aug 1854, who will be home in April; the sending of her letter when Eleanor herself is so full of sorrow and also that of Lady Franklin will not be forgotten.

27 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/9

Letter from Richard Collinson to Eleanor Isabella Gell

He has little doubt that Captaisn Austin's and M'Clure's travelling parties will meet up and that traces will be found; it is a bitter disppointment to him that he should have been an object of distress; before he left the continent of America he asked for the opinions of the officers, who were unanimous in thinking that their progress would be blocked for that season; he determined to try northwards but found it the most compact ice anyone had seen; they will endeavour, when the first break occurs, to push eastward allong the American coast, hopefully allwoing him to deliver the letter...

28 Mar 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/10

Letter from L.A. Cotton to friend Eleanor Isabella Franklin

The letter consists of 2 sheets and the inside of the envelope for the final passage. Letter dated only 18 March, but envelope is postmarked for Bristol 19 March 1848.

18 Mar 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/11

Letter from Maria Cox to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Gratified at Eleanor's note thanking her for gift to her little girl; remembers Gell at the age his children were then and at all stages of childhood, including his old haunts at Rugby; sha has been at Spondon where her niece, Mrs William Cox, read a most feeling letter from Miss Nightingale to one of their servants, whose son had died of fever at Scutari, whose Miss N. and her nurse had attended, administering port wine and arrow root medicine and having a chaplain attendance, which letter was a reassurance to the parents

1 May 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/12

Letter from Cecille Cramar to Eleanor Isabella Gell

In French; marked in pencil as being about Marianne Simpkinson going over to Rome [i.e. converting to Roman Catholicism]

19 Nov 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/13

Letter from Fanny Dyster to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Address at the top is unclear [?Campanaia]. Postmarked for Madeira 31 Oct 1846

27 Oct 1846

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/14

Letter from Frederic Dyster to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Including references to Eleanor's poor health, her anxiety, her resilience and her concerns over the return of Mr Gell to England

7 Dec 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/15

Letter from Frederic Dyster to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Including reference to her father's promotion [to Rear Admiral] as a sad mockery

5 Nov 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/16

Letter from J. Earle to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Lady Simpkinson asks whether Franklin can stay another week with them; he has been no trouble; a few more days may establish his health and he has not been out much with the variable weather.

27 Oct 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/17

Letter from K.E. Ferguson to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Congratulations on Eleanor's upcoming marriage

5 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/18

Letter from Cath. Fraser to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Only dated 10 Feb, but 1848 has been added in pencil

10 Feb [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/19

Letter from Cath. Fraser to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

References to Henry Voller at Newgate; she heard from Lady Pine that she had spoken to the Govern, Mr Cope, and the Surgeon, Mr McMurdo,; their impressions of his charcater were favourable, but Henry had first spoken of pleading guilty and since retracted; he will probably be sent ot the House of Correction, being too old for Parkhurst; once the term of imprisonment expires the only asylum available would be the Refuge at Hoxton; she is only visiting, but it will be several weeks before she returns to Camberwell, hopefully calling on Eleanor and Lady Franklin when she is settled at home...

15 Feb [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/20

Letter from Cath. Fraser to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On presenting the accounts to a committee relating to the patronage of young women held in the Asylum, with emigration being the only recourse in some instances, although very few of the girls acquire sufficient stability of character to be trusted among doubtful characters; reference to similar situation with the "E.Fry Refuge"; it is many months since she has had direct news from Van Diemen's Land; Mr G.W. Walker has written about the great numbers of public houses in Hobart; reference to informing the Secretary for the Colonies through an M.P.; a ship with women will be leaving England...

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/21

Letter from Maria Gawler to Eleanor Isabella and John Gell

Congratulations on their marriage

13 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/22

Letter from Maria Gawler to Eleanor Isabella Gell

References to Eleanor's child Franklin being under her charge, well and happy, with the weak point in his walking being the hips; the young boy is too fat and heavy for his limbs; she and Colonel Gawler thinks his diet should be of the most nourishing and least fattening description; he is receiving baths, and she hopes they can try him in the open sea; referring to Julia not letting her children do the same at Brighton; Franklin is a sweet-natured child, who has won the heart of Col. Gawler.

26 Sep 1853

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/23

Letter from Maria Gawler to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Monday 17 Oct , but 1853 has been added in pencil

17 Oct [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/24

Letter from Annie Gilbert to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

The first to welcome her to Eastbourne on the day of Eleanor's marriage; she hopes she will find everything arranged for her comfort

7 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/25

Letter from Annie Gilbert to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated Monday evening, but 1850 has been added in pencil

[1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/26

Letter from Edward Griffiths to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On newspapers containing reports by Sir J. Ross (official) and Sir John Richardson. Letter only dated Saturday, with references to Monday 13th; year may possibly be 1849, after both Sir James Ross and Sir John Richardson had returned from expeditions.

[c1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/27

Letter from Julia Hall to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Congratulations on Eleanor's marriage

13 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/28

Letter from Julia Hall to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for sympathy from Mr Gell and her on the death of Julia's son due to scarlettina. Reference to "precious Gawler" being taken ill yesterday week, just when "dear John Robert" had been pronounced out of danger. Paper black-edged. Only dated 19 Feb. Marked in pencil that Gawler of Derby was Governor of Adelaide.

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/29

Letter from Elizabeth F.S. Harris to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

On her Eleanor's note having been forwarded by her brother relating to Elizabeth's book on her struggles with Roman Catholicism

24 Nov 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/30

Letter from Elizabeth F.S. Harris to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Relating to various topics of Roman Catholicism, particularly on excommunication; also onon the first proof stage of publishing her book under the title "Rest in the Church".

5 Dec 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/31

Letter from Elizabeth F.S. Harris to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks for her note and kind interest; she does not think she can yet return to the church [i.e Anglican], as she is still struggling with the thoughts of apostacy and excommunication; she hopes Eleanor's "present indisposition" of anxiety is only temporrary. Elizabeth adds after her signature "Named in Religion, M. Magdalen Margaret". Only dated Monday afternoon.

[Jan 1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/32

Letter from Elizabeth F.S. Harris to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Apologies for her long silence; waiting for "some conclusive reasoning to awaken" in her own mind, she feels worn out; she is sorry that Eleanor does not like her "poor little book", and she scarcely understands Eleanor's objections.

25 Feb 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/33

Letter from Elizabeth F.S. Harris to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks for her kind note received at Windsor; she has been interrupted in her correspondence by "many occupations of the chance kind and many surrounding friends"; she wished she could have seen Eleanor on her journey to Clifton or called on her in London; much as she values knowing her, Eleanor would not want to meet her as a Roman Catholic with the same feelings as an Anglican; she is occupied in assisting in the translation of a book of prayers and meditations and in doing a small theological work lately published by the Abbess Robert.

19 Aug 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/34

Letter from Elizabeth F.S. Harris to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Response to Eleanor thinking that Elizabeth was "building up some vain vision of a tower of refuge … in human things", including memories of her first interview with a priest and farewell conversation with a fellow guest, a young Frenchman, about the chances of going to heaven.

19 Sep 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/35

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Only dated 31 Jan [or possibly July], but the year 1848 has been added in pencil. Paper black-edged.

31 Jan [1848]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/36

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Written on the day before Eleanor's marriage. Envelope postmarked for 5 Jun 1849 Clifton.

6 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/37

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Written when Eleanor is on her honeymoon. Congratulations on marriage. Envelope postmarked Clifton.

12 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/38

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Only dated 6 Feb, but 1850 has been added in pencil [changed from 1851]

6 Feb [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/39

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 5 Feb, but year 1851 has been added in pencil [changed from 1850]

5 Feb [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/40

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated Thursday 3 July. No year given, but could be 1851.

3 Jul [1851]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/41

Letter from J.N. Hayne to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

Contains congratulations on appointment of Mr Gell's appointment at Notting Hill. Paper black-edged. Only dated 16 Sep, but year 1854 has been added in pencil

16 Sep [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/42

Letter from Louisa Herring to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Sorry not to have been in when she and her cousins called yesterday, as she would liked to have shown them her "Malta people"; will all three come tomorrow; Miss Francis will call at 9 with her aunt's permission.

[c1836]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/43

Letter from Louisa Herring to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Sympathises with her over her agitated feelings over the last few days; anxious to know the the opinion of Sir James Ross on the original Esquimaux report relating to the ships and their location. Letter only dated 18 Nov, but 1849 has been added in pencil

18 Nov [1849]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/44

Letter from Louisa Herring to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for letter relating to Eleanor's Mama's plans; hopes that she will be able to breach that which separates Eleanor and Lady Franklin

18 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/45

Letter from Lady Maria Hooker to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including references to hearing of M'Clure's safety, she and her husband visiitng their daughter Mrs Thomas Evans, whose health has improved since her marriage. Letter only dated 10 Oct; 1849 or 50 has been added in pencil, but the reference to M'Clure's safety makes 1853 a more likely year.

10 Oct [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/46

Letter from Lady Maria Hooker to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for Eleanor's sympathy over her son, who has assured her that he is safe and expects to be released [Joseph Hooker had been imprisoned in Nov 1849 in Sikkim, while on expedition in the Himalayas]. Letter only dated 22 Jan, but 1850 has been added in pencil

22 Jan [1850]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/47

Letter from Rachel Hutchins to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Acquainted with Eleanor, Lady Franklin and Mr Gell; including references to having lived in Rectory Farm since she came to England, apart from the first two or three months

29 Jun 1844

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/48

Letter from Fred Leicester to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Apologies for delay in replying to her note; he cannot accept the office she proposes for him, certainly not without a distinct previous understanding with Lady Franklin; he is under obligations to Lady Franklin for former kindnesses, and there is an additional tie of consanguinity between them, however slight; if she does not object to his conferring with Lady Franklin, he will give the proposal further consideration. Letter only dated 19 May, but "?1855" has been added in pencil.

19 May [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/49

Letter from Annie M. Lowe to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Congratulations on Eleanor's upcoming marriage. Envelope postmarked Hurstperpoint

4 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/50

Letter from Julia Mackintosh to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Glad to hear of safe arrival; worried that Eleanor is too reliant on God's will and could be subject to disappointment: hopes that she will spend winter out of England; news about the political situation in Italy, with the royal family being at Lucca, the Princess having a miscarriage after being told by the Grand Duke of the change of government, the King of Naples being at Porlice, the insurgent holding Messian, Catania and Trapani in Sicily; undecied about future travel palns, but it is too late for the West Indies . Letter only dated 20 Oct, but the events in Italy suggest the year 1847.

20 Oct [1847]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/51

Letter from R.J. Macintosh to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

On her coming to Strathpeffer on the steamer. The letter is only dated 11 Aug, but 1857 has been added in pencil.

11 Aug [1857]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/52

Letter from Elizabeth Marriott to her friend Elizabeth Isabella Gell, with envelope

Thanks for writing on the eve of Eleanor's marriage

11 Jun 1849

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/53

Letter from Elizabeth Marriott to her friend Elizabeth Isabella Gell, with envelope

She has writen to Mr Coleridge, but not received any response to what Eleanor had suggested she is confident Mr Gell will meet the requirements for the office at St Augustine's; reference to correspondence of Bishop Selwyn and Mr Godley in the Guardian newspaper, wondering whether Mr Gell's experience would lead him to understand the serious consequences of mis-government at the Colonial Office, as Mr Godley fears.

8 Jan 1850

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/54

Letter from Mary Atkinson Maurice to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

Thanks of Mrs Powell for Eleanor's kind thought to take care of her little girl; Mrs Hare has been confined to bed, hopes to attend the funeral service tomorrow. Letter is dated 29 Jan. Envelope is marked as being on the death of Archdeacon Hare and held three letters, 2 from Mrs Powell and Miss Maurice.

29 Jan [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/55

Letter from Lucille Powell to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Telling her of the death of her brother [Julius Charles Hare, Archdeacon of Lewes]; her sister thanks her for her kind note. Letter is only dated 27 Jan, but Archdeacon Hare is known to have died on 23 Jan 1853.

27 Jan [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/56

Letter from Mary Atkinson Maurice to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On the funeral of Archdeacon Hare yesterday, which went well: Mrs Hare was able to attend and was later correcting the proofs of her husband's "last charge". The letter is only dated Wednesday, but the date 2 Feb 1853 can be inferred from the contents.

[2 Feb 1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/57

Letter from Mary Atkinson Maurice to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Identified in pencil as the mother of Rev. F.. Maurice. The letter is only dated 11 Oct. Paper black-edged.

[mid 1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/58

Letter from Augusta S. Moore to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Thanks for having written to her; prospects for Eleanor's future are bright, with hopes it will not be long before her happiness is complete, when she is united with one whom she has heard is a such a devoted servant of God; the Moores are visiting Ireland and are delighted with what they have seen.

3 Sep 1844

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/59

Letter from M. Newman to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including references to Lady Franklin's extraordinary conduct. Only dated 9 May, but year 1853 has been added in pencil. The signature of the first name is not clear, but may possibly be Maria.

9 May [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/60

Letter from M. Newman to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 9 July, but year 1853 has been added in pencil. Enevlope postmarked for 11 July

9 Jul [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/61

Letter from M. Newman to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks to her husband for his letter, in which he first found out about the birth of her little Mary; sympathising with her over her sad news; Lady Franklin still of the same disposition, but in time she will be sorry for the mischief she has done; he is glad she is going to Notting Hill, where she will be amongst them.

3 Nov 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/62

Letter from M. Newman to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On being confined to his bed since 11 Dec with illness; reference to Eleanor having the mumps. Only dated Tuesday evening. Paper black-edged.

[Dec 1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/63

Letter from M. Newman to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Only dated 3 Jan but 1855 has been added in pencil; contains references to her new house, which Simpkinson says is so nice. Paper black-edged.

3 Jan [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/64

Letter from M. Newman to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Including reference to meeting Dr Spence at Blackheath, it being a treat to hear his old Cambridge Pastor, and on sending a book to daughter Eleanor. Letter dated only 28 April

28 Apr [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/65

Letter from Anna M. Nixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only dated 25 Nov; 1855 has been added in pencil

25 Nov [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/66

Letter from Anna M. Nixon to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Letter only 26 Dec; it is similar in paper and style to an earlier letter of 25 Nov, so a tentative attribution to the year 1855 has been made.

26 Dec [1855]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/67

Letter from Francis R. Nixon, Bishop of Tasmania, to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

He refers to his meeting and corresponding with Lord Grey about his Van Diemen's Land work "viz. a game of chess"

25 Nov 1847

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/68

Letter from Eliza B. Oliver to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for her kind letter and also to lady Franklin for letting her know what is going on with the expeditions.

3 Feb 1854

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/69

Letter from Annie Owen to her friend Eleanor Isabella Gell

She would have liked to have seen her, her husband and the children when they were in London, and hopes to do so in the spring when next up; Hester [?Davies] quite herself; daughter Eleanor ia precocius child to begin lessons so early; hopes thinsg are better within the family, having heard of a settlement made bettween aunt and nephew; reference to enquiry about Mr and Mrs Gell going to to New Zealand, on account of the proposed bishopric. Letter is only dated 14 Feb, but the references makes the year possibly 1853.

14 Feb [1853]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/70

Letter from Eliz. Palgrave to Eleanor Isabella Gell

She has spoken to Mr [?]Stinger, who is happy to ask prayers of his church and would like to know the date she has fixed. The letter has only been dated 2 March, but "?1852" has ben added in pencil.

2 Mar [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/71

Letter from Eliza M. Peddie to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Thanks for her sympathetic letter; she agrees with Eleanor that none of the officer or men are alive now; her husband's last letter from Disco says that, although not in the Erebus, he often dined with Eleanor's father and that he was more like a father than a supreme Commanding Officer to those serving under him; she has lost a little girl aged 4 and a half [early in 1849]. Marked in pencil as from Mrs Peddie, widow of an officer on the Terror. Late only dated 20 Feb, but "?1852" has been added in pencil. Paper black-edged.

20 Feb [1852]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/72

Letter from Anne Petrie to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Glad to hear from her; she called at Seymour Street last summer in hope of seeing her, but house shut up, with the postman not able to tell where they had gone; her young boy is the only one not suffering, a young Hercules and big for his age; she found letters in a cover, just as Eleanor had returned them to her; there is no hurry for Eleanor in copying them, knowing they are safe in her hands; there are several personal details of interest for a memoir; her aunt has been reading them and sends her remembrances to Mrs Booth. Added in pencil that Anne Petrie is a Flinders cousin, possibly...

[mid 1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/73

Letter from George Pinnock to Eleanor Isabella Gell

On not being able to exchange with the Gells, with him not being able to vacate the house, with having his family all about him, including his invalid son; offering the option of Mr Pierpoint, who is keen to take the opportunity

3 Apr 1851

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/74

Letter from Mary Poindexter to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Letter postmarked for Baltimore 6 July 1846

3 Jul 1846

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/75

Letter from M.A. Roberts to Eleanor Isabella Gell, with envelope

On the genealogy of the Porden family; the late George Field, Mr and Mrs Porden, Mr William Bond the engraver, and Mr J. Linnell Bond the architect,were on intimate terms; Mrs Field was the widow of an officer when she married George; he promises her letters after the sale; with Mr Field being a literary gentleman, there are hundreds of letters to read; in the sale is ring inscribed with a memorial inscription for Eleanor Anne Franklin; he often heard of Miss Porden being in Mr Field's society at the time her Coeur de Lion was published in 1822. Envelope postmarked for Brentford 4 Apr 1855

4 Apr 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/76

Letter from M. de la Roquette to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Happy to have the approval of the daughter and sister of the great navigator Sir John Franklin for his attempt to write his life; asks for compliments to sent to Madame Booth.

20 Dec 1856

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/77

Letter from N. Rousset to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Addressed to"Madame & chere soeur en Christ". Apologies over his error in his recital about Lieutenant Bellot, which he made by innocently copying from the Leisure House Journal a phrase about his being engaged to the daughter of Lady Franklin.. Postmark for Brighton.

6 Sep 1855

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/78

Letter from E. Stanley to Eleanor Isabella Gell, on contributions for wounded in the Scutari hospitals in the Crimea

She is replying, as Mary has set off for Scutari that morning in charge of 50 more nurses. References to the Gells having a new house, and Mr Gell having a new parish. Letter is only dated 2 Dec, but the references in it means that the year is 1854. the person is identified in pencil as Miss Stanley, sister of Dean Stanley (?Mrs Vaughan).

2 Dec [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/79

Letter from C.S.T. [Torlesse] to Eleanor Isabella Gell

With Fanny going to Eleanor's house, he forwards a copy of a few remarks at the time of his dear Louisa's death, which she must return; he also copies in the letter some remarks from a private journal dated 18 and 25 Oct 1847 for Eleanor's visit; on Sunday he received a letter from his son dated 6 Sep, including passages about religious feeling in the colony, including reference to Mr Gell. Paper black-edged.

24 Feb 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/80

Letter from C.S. Torlesse to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Referring to death of her daughter, her "choice flower", following peritonitis, who had been shocked at Louisa's death; also including reference to Mr Bowman who has Mr Gell's approbation

15 Apr 1852

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/81

Letter from Anne Waddington to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Congratulations on birth of child and preferements bestowed by the Bishop of London on Mr Gell; hopes to see them from time to time at St John's Lodge, Notting Hill. Letter only dated 6 Oct, but year 1854 has been added in pencil.

6 Oct [1854]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/82

Letter from Mr and Mrs G. Walter to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Asking her to accept a copy of the History of England as a small tribute of respect for the many kindnesses shown by Sir John and Lady Franklin

29 Jan 1840

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/83

Letter from Fanny Walter to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Only dated Wednesday evening

[early 1840s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/84

First page of letter from Fanny Walter to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Includes reference to Mr Gell having been due to be ordained as a priest the day before. Undated, but 1843 has been added in pencil.

[1843]

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/85

Letter from Fanny Walter to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Cross hatched writing. Endorsed as answered 20 Oct 1844

29 May 1844

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/86

Letter from J. Williams, Chaplain of Cold Bath Fields Prison, to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, with envelope

Thanks from him and Rev. E.A. Illingworth for information in the case of Henry Vollers; they will watch his state of mind and will inform her of any changes, assuring her that in that prison there is no danger of "contamination" unlike Newgate

13 Apr 1848

D8760/F/FEG/1/52/87

First page of letter from unknown writer to Eleanor Isabella Gell

Concerning the sending of chairs to be sent to E.B., addressed to Rev. R.N. Pierpoint; reference to giving up hope for the life of William; reference to poor Hester G. Davies starting for Berne on Thursday, a loving, devoted sister with 5 children.

Only dated Sunday.

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/1/53

Envelopes addressed to Eleanor Isabella Franklin, later Gell, but not united with appropriate letters

Two marked for Miss Franklin, the remainder for Mrs Gell or Mrs J.P.Gell. One item added from accession D3311.

[1844-1856]

D8760/F/FEG/2

Diaries of Eleanor Isabella Gell nee Franklin

The diaries relate to her time in Tasmania while her father was Lieutenent Governor of Van Diemen's Land (including the journey out), her later travels with her aunt to the Americas, the continent and within England, and after her marriage to John Philip Gell. She was not a consistent writer in her diaries, and there are frequent gaps between dates, as well as lengthy periods when not entires were made.

1836-1850

D8760/F/FEG/2/1

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, for the journey to Van Deimen's Land and several months of her residence there

Covering 26 Aug 1836 - 24 Jan 1837, on journey to Van Diemen's Land; 26 Oct - 1 Nov 1839; 24 Mar 1842 - 19 Feb 1843.

26 Aug 1836-19 Feb 1843

D8760/F/FEG/2/2

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, during her residence in Van Diemen's Land

 

4 Jun 1838-16 Mar 1842

D8760/F/FEG/2/3

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her time in Australia, Van Diemen's Land and England

Covering 13 Dec 1840 - 19 Jan 1841, relating to travels in South Australia; 20 Feb - 10 Jun 1840, in Van Diemen's Land; 9 Dec 1843 - 20 Mar 1850 on return from Australia and life in England (entries very infrequent); from the back, upside down, are assorted medicinal recipes, 1848-1853, with three landscape sketches in pencil, 21 Jan 1841.

13 Dec 1840-20 Mar 1850

D8760/F/FEG/2/4

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels in France, with pages at back used by John Philip Gell for trip to Arthur's Lakes in Tasmania

Covering the period 8 Sep -19 Oct 1845, Eleanor travelling in France with stepmother Lady Franklin, cousin Willingham Franklin, grandfather John Griffin and the Majendies (relations of Lady Franklin) and 14 March 1846, for John Philp Gell's trip with his cousin Philip,

8 Sep 1845-19 Mar 1846

D8760/F/FEG/2/5

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels with Lady Franklin in the West Indies

 

10 Feb 1846-2 Apr 1846

D8760/F/FEG/2/6

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin relating to her travels with Lady Franklin in the West Indies, United States of America and Canada

 

5 Mar 1846-1 Jul 1846

D8760/F/FEG/2/7

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels with Lady Franklin in Canada and the United States of America

 

1 Jul 1846-3 Aug 1846

D8760/F/FEG/2/8

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels in the West Midlands and West of England

For period 14 Sep - 6 Oct 1846, travelling with stepmother Lady Franklin, grandfather John Griffin, and Forster, including visits Birmingham, Worcester, Malvern, Gloucester, Cheltenham, Bristol and Clifton. 26 Jul 1848, including visits to Weston super Mare, Porlock and Dunster Castle

Sep 1846 - Aug 1848

D8760/F/FEG/2/9

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels with Lady Franklin in Italy

 

6 Apr 1847-1 Aug 1847

D8760/F/FEG/2/10

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels with Lady Franklin in Italy

 

23 Jun 1847-1 Aug 1847

D8760/F/FEG/2/11

Diary of Eleanor Isabella Franklin, relating to her travels with Lady Franklin in Belgium and Kent

Covering the periods 3-19 Aug 1847, from Milan to Ghent in Belgium, and 6-10 Sep 1848, in Kent

Aug 1847-Sep 1848

D8760/F/FEG/3

Personal records of Eleanor Isabella Gell nee Franklin

 

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1

Notes and drafts made or collected by Eleanor Isabella Gell nee Franklin, some of which seem to relate to the preparation of a biography of her father, Sir John Franklin

 

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/1

First page of draft of outline of career of Sir John Franklin, written by Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Covers the period 1786-1819

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/2

Draft of biography of Sir John Franklin, written by Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Starting with a few pages of family history background

8 unnumbered pages followed by pages numbered 1-44.

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/3

Loose pages of draft biography of Sir John Franklin, written by Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Concerning the period of his return to England in 1822 to his setting out on his second land expedition in 1825 and his return from that expedition to his service on H.M.S. Rainbow in Greece in 1829

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/4

File of pages of draft biography of Sir John Franklin, written by Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Somewhat disorganized in order, with some pages numbered, including passages on his qualities as a captain, the death of his brother Major Franklin, his appointment as Governor ov Van Diemen's Land and the journey there in 1836-1837, the journey back in 1843, and his return to England, 1843-1844

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/5

Extract from letter originally dated 15 July 1842, relating to thanks of those attending an assembly meeting chaired by Sir John Franklin on what is thought to be the last occasion he will be present before he sails from Tasmania to England

Copied by Eleanor Isabella Franklin

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/6

Handwritten extracts from Captain Fitzjames's letter to Sir John Barrow off the coast of Greenland, original letter dated 1-12 July 1845

They had travelled quickly, not going within 70 miles of Cape Farewell, and they lost no time, his only difficulty being to get Sir John to shorten sail when it was wanted; Sir John is full of life and energy, with good judgement and a capital memory, one of the best he knows, with delightful and most instructive conversation, the most fitted for the command of an enterprise requiring sound sense and great perseverance; he has learnt much from him and considers himself most fortunate to be with him; the Erebus "is very easy" apart from the occasional kick and plunge; everybody is...

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/7

Handwritten extracts from Captain Fitzjames's letter to Sir John Barrow off the coast of Greenland, original letter dated 1-12 July 1845

They had travelled quickly, not going within 70 miles of Cape Farewell, and they lost no time, his only difficulty being to get Sir John to shorten sail when it was wanted; Sir John is full of life and energy, with good judgement and a capital memory, one of the best he knows, with delightful and most instructive conversation, the most fitted for the command of an enterprise requiring sound sense and great perseverance; he has learnt much from him and considers himself most fortunate to be with him; the Erebus "is very easy" apart from the occasional kick and plunge; everybody is...

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/8

Handwritten extracts from Captain Fitzjames's letter to Sir John Barrow off the coast of Greenland, original letter dated 1-12 July 1845

They had travelled quickly, not going within 70 miles of Cape Farewell, and they lost no time, his only difficulty being to get Sir John to shorten sail when it was wanted; Sir John is full of life and energy, with good judgement and a capital memory, one of the best he knows, with delightful and most instructive conversation, the most fitted for the command of an enterprise requiring sound sense and great perseverance; he has learnt much from him and considers himself most fortunate to be with him; the Erebus "is very easy" apart from the occasional kick and plunge; everybody is...

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/9

Manuscript transcriptions of letters sent by J.W. Fairholme to his father, while on the voyage of Franklin's last expedition of 1845

Comprising letters sent from Greenhithe, 17 May, off Aberdeen, 29 May, and inside the Arctic, 1 July 1845 - order seemingly confused

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/10

Manuscript copy of account of clairvoyancy, involving Dr Haddock and medium Emma, taking place on 21-22 September 1849, written out by E.I. Gell

Including references to Dr Haddock, surgeon apothecary of Bolton, performing mesmerism on clairvoyante named Emma; copy of letter dated 21 Sep 1849 referring to Sir John's still being alive with 3 or 4 companions inland, with one ship sunk and the other abandoned; report to Captain Maconachie by the person writing the account of his personally taking part in 3 seances with the clairvoyante, said to be aged 22 from Broomsgrove [Bromsgrove] near Birmingham, describing her changed behaviour under Memserism and her seeming to have a conversation with Sir John; she also claimed to be in touch...

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/1/11

Manuscript transcript of extract from the Presidential address of Sir Roderick Murchison to the Geographical Section of the British Association at the Oxford meeting of 1860, in hand of Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Found loose in front endpapers of The Fate of Sir John Franklin, by Captain F.L. McClintock (D8760/F/LIB/5/9/1)

[1860]

D8760/F/FEG/3/2

Items relating to the time when H.M.S. Erebus and Terror was in Hobart, Tasmania, during the Antarctic expedition commanded by James Clark Ross

 

1841

D8760/F/FEG/3/2/1

Invitation card from Captains Crozier and Ross and the Officers of H.M.S. Erebus and Terror to a ball on 1 June on board the ships, delivered to Eleanor Isabella Franklin

To take place at 8pm. Signed by C. Gerron Phillip, Hon. Sec.With tag "On return to Australia from Antartic [sic] Expedition"

21 May 1841

D8760/F/FEG/3/2/2

Draft addresses by Eleanor Isabella Franklin to Captains Crozier and Ross on the occasion for the presentation of a wattle [a shrub or small tree meant to be emblematic of Tasmania] to Crozier and a little flower stand to Ross to remind them of their stay in Hobart prior to their setting sail for England

Although 1842 has been written in pencil at the top and on the reverse, the items are likely have been presented in July 1841, when the ships were due to leave Hobart for England

[Jun] 1841

D8760/F/FEG/3/3

Note of confirmation of Eleanor Isabella Franklin

Examined and approved by William Bedford, Senior Chaplain

20 Sep 1843

D8760/F/FEG/3/4

List of places, possibly of prints, in handwriting of Eleanor Isabella Franklin

On back of card of Mr Dolland thanking Sir Francis and Lady Simpkinson for their enquiries (black-edged)

18 Mar 1849

D8760/F/FEG/3/5

Drawing in pencil of Matlock Rectory by E. Gell, believed to be Eleanor Isabella Gell

 

[1850s]

D8760/F/FEG/3/6

Manuscript extract from an Australian newspaper relating to Captain Flinders, sent by Miss Tyler

Proceedings of a public meeting at which the Auditor General moved for pension arrears to be made for Mrs Flinders, widow (£100 per annum), reporting testimonials for all that Captain Flinders had achieved.

10 Jan 1854

D8760/F/FEG/3/7

Manuscript poem sent to Eleanor Franklin, entitled "The Dying Mother to her Infant" by F.S.P.W.

 

3 Dec 1838

D8760/F/FEG/3/8

Hand-written subjects for prayer belonging to Eleanor Gell

One written out for Eleanor by Frederick Gell (copied from the Barham Almanac for 1844 by Rev. A. Oxenden), two copied out in Eleanor's hand, including for Sunday morning and evening, and two in hand of John Philip Gell for morning based on Psalm 63 v.1-5 and Thursday evening based on St Luke 14 v.16-24

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/3/9

Manuscript transcript of passage entitled "For keeping the Heart", copied out in unknown hand

Found amongst letters of Eleanor Franklin, possibly sent with one of them.

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/4

Letters and other documents following the death and burial of Eleanor Isabella Gell nee Franklin in 1860

Eleanor Isabella Gell died at Tredunnoc, Monmouthshire, on 30 August, having contracted scarlet while nursing local children

1860-[early 20th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/4/1

Draft biographical notes on Eleanor Isabella Franklin by Philip Lyttelton Gell

 

[early 20th cent]

D8760/F/FEG/4/2

Mourning card for Eleanor Isabella Gell, with black-edged envelope

Mourning card in memory of Mrs John Philip Gell, died 30 Aug 1860, interred at Tredunnoc, Monmouthshire, 4 Sep

1860

D8760/F/FEG/4/3

Printed copy of inscription on the memorial monument for Eleanor Isabella Gell in Tredunnoc, Monmouthshire

Attached to piece of paper describing it as the monument to Eleanor, Mrs John Philip Gell, age 36, 1860, in the hand of Aileen E.P. Gell

1860

D8760/F/FEG/4/4

Dried flowers collected from the grave Eleanor Isabella Gell in Tredunnoc, Monmouthshire and mounted on black-edged pages by John Philip Gell for the Gell children, collected together in booklet covers

Pages made out individually for Alice, Eleanor, Franklin, Henry, Lucy, Mary and Philip; page made out collectively for Eleanor, Franklin and Philip (the elder children); page made out collectively for Mary, Henry, Alice and Lucy (the younger children).

Gathered in blue pocket book covers

4 Sep 1860

D8760/F/FEP

Records of Eleanor Anne Porden, first wife of Sir John Franklin

The records of Eleanor Anne Porden passed to her daughter Eleanor Isabella, who married John Philip Gell in 1849. On the death of Eleanor Isabella in 1860, they became the property of John Philip Gell, who died in 1898. They would have then come into the possession of their son, Philip Lyttelton Gell, who inherited Hopton Hall in the 1920s.


The records include Eleanor Porden's correspondence and travel jounals, and papers relating to her death. The bulk of the material consists of manuscript and published poetry written by Eleanor Porden, and in particular the volumes of the 'Attic Chest...

1800-1828

D8760/F/FEP/1

Correspondence of Eleanor Anne Porden

The letters date from 1800 when she was five years old to April 1825, with 4 letters written by her husband, John Franklin, before he was aware that she had actually died. They mostly consist of letters received by her, although there six letters written by her to her friend Henry Elliott, 1815-1822, and three draft letters written to other friends.


Other letters written by Eleanor Anne Porden are to be found elsewhere in the Gell collection: 54 letters to John Franklin, 1821-1824, at D8760/F/FSJ/1/1/1-54: 11 letters to her sister Sarah Henrietta Kay, 1822-1824, at D8760/F/FKA/1/3/1-8; 1...

1800-1825

D8760/F/FEP/1/1

Letters from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, later his wife

They had originally met after Franklin had returned from the expedition to the North Pole in 1818. Having visited the ships H.M.S. Isabella and before they were due to set off to investigate Baffin Bay, she had written a poem called "The Arctic Expeditions", which was published in March 1818. This poem had come to the attention of Franklin, who had commanded H.M.S. Trent one of the two ships sent to travel to the North Pole and returned to England in October 1818. Through mutual friends, the Thomsons, they met up in January and soon became attached to each other. Not long afterwards...

1822-1825

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/1

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on his return to Britain after his first Arctic land expedition, including reference to naming of Arctic islands after the Pordens

Writing at a distance of 600 miles from the Orkney Isles, on a channel of correspondence that is 'precarious and often entirely interrupted'. Thanks Eleanor for her previous letters and congratulates her on her 'Ode on the Coronation'. Trusts that his official dispatches have reached England and information has made the public press. Regrets that until that time, he cannot divulge any official information. Looks forward to chatting about his adventures with Eleanor and William Porden in Berners Street. Has named some islands in the Arctic 'Porden' after the family. Have had mild winters in...

2 Oct 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/2

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, soon after his return to London after his first Arctic land expedition, including condolences on death of her father William Porden

Grieved at receiving note from her, with condolences on mournful event; his purpose is to call tomorrow; thanks her for interest in the expedition.

Date Nov 1822 added in pencil at top [Franklin returned to London from his first land expedition in October 1822; Eleanor's father had died on 14 Sep 1822]

[Nov 1822]

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/3

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, relating to his apprehensive behaviour at their first meeting after his return from then Arctic

Grateful to Eleanor for her kind words with respect to her sentiments concerning him. Intends to shed appearance of anxiety and uncertainty from their next meeting. Regrets that he may have shown this before, but it was due to his apprehension. Wasn't dissatisfied with her reasons for delaying her answer to his proposal. Chooses to send his correspondence by post. Still has faith in her character, affability and excellent judgement. Many thanks for good wishes concerning his book. Will call on Mrs. Kay on Sunday.

6 Dec 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/4

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, including references to Eleanor's health and her mistake in thinking he does not want to meet her friends

Apologies for not writing by last packet, will do so this evening. Not surprised that Eleanor suffered in the coastal weather, as in the "dense atmosphere" of Frith Street the fires needed renewing; hopes the air in Hastings does not increase her cough. Would be delighted to meet her friends, and she is mistaken in her apprehension that he would not be. Would be glad to see her drawings of Hastings when she returns. Will be happy to see her again in Berners Street. Hopes to hear from her if convenient.

16 Dec 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/5

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on his hoping to meet up with Eleanor and her niece in Hyde Park

Note accompanying the arrival of Eleanor's servant. Room much brighter and more cheerful than usual. Happy to exhibit with Eleanor's niece in Hyde Park on the condition that she walks between the hours of two and four (more spectators). Regrets that he'll be busy all day but on Friday he will visit her home.

[Undated but Eleanor had sent a letter on 15 Jan 1823 asking him to "exhibit" with her niece].

[16 Jan 1823]

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/6

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on his having been engaged in business but wanting to be with her tomorrow

Has been engaged with brother all day on a matter of business that required immediate attention. Her note was very satisfactory to him. He will try to be with her tomorrow. Has to go again with his brother to attend to other business. They look forward to being introduced to Eleanor again.

Written 6 o'clock Thursday [i.e. 17th], postmarked morning 18 Jan 1823.

17-18 Jan 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/7

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on his having a cold and not being able to visit her that day

Has a severe cold and so must refrain from venturing out to see Eleanor. Endeavors to visit tomorrow. Weather milder today which he hopes is more favourable to her health.

Written Saturday afternoon; paper watermarked 1820.

[early 1823]

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/8

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, responding to her letter by denying that he denounced literature and wanted to put any bounds on her ambitions or enjoyment of her literary circle of friends

He has read her letter with the greatest attention and cannot delay expressing his sincere esteem of the feeling which activated her in the painful task of writing it. He has great pleasure in admitting the sentiments it contains, and that the motives she urges in support of the only point of difference of opinion have changed his mind. He has no doubts that satisfactory arrangements can be made at their next interview, hopefully tomorrow after one. Denies he is aware of denouncing the "Anathema against Literature"; he meant only to express his deficiency in that area; he was not conscious...

[29 Mar 1823]

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/9

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to family in Lincolnshire, including a description of the Franklin family, who know of Eleanor's work and are pleased at the couple's intimacy

Rejoiced at hearing that Eleanor's health is improving. John's own health has been restored. Eleanor is mistaken in thinking that John's family have not heard of her and her work. They are delighted with the couple's intimacy. Will endeavour to give some account of them. Father is old and suffering blindness and deafness. His family now consists of seven persons: two brothers (in India), and four sisters. They will all be happy to receive Eleanor as John's wife. Two other brothers in law Sellwood, being one, but his sisters (their wives) are dead. John is now going to the sea coast. Would...

16 May 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/10

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to family in Lincolnshire, including on his support of the established church and hopes for her improved health in the country

Visiting Ingoldmells, extremely flat country left by the sea, good for raising cattle, with fine churches, but no trees; compares it with their march into the Barren Grounds in North America. Finding it difficult to know on what subjects to write to her, his powers of composition being equal to her. Writing to her on a Sunday being contrary to his usual practice; their views on the observance of the Sabbath being different; his being a warm advocate of the established church and its institutions. Trusts she has benefitted from the change of air in the country at what he is the best time of...

17 May 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/11

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to family in Lincolnshire, including on the state of his affections for Eleanor before he left on his Arctic land expedition in 1819

Apologies that he could not answer her previous correspondence due to him being in Ingoldmells and out of his channel of communication. This letter ought to be a 'formidable' one, due to four letters from Eleanor coming before this. They were all pleasurable. Regrets the passing of Eleanor's father, and assures her he will be remembered. Had made up his mind that he should reveal his affections for Eleanor before his last voyage, but thought it imprudent as there was so much danger inherent in the mission. He thought of her a lot on the voyage, especially in the rough parts. Quotes...

26 May 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/12

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to family in Lincolnshire, including statements on his religious beliefs and outlook

Greatly misses Eleanor's interesting letters. Enjoys writing to Eleanor despite what she thinks. Has not been able to keep on top of the poor state of communication in his current location. Mostly received Eleanor's letters whilst at table with strangers. Has recovered health completely. Hopes that Eleanor's 'better judgement' has helped her find a better house than the ones he has managed to find. Doesn't expect 'complete conformity' with regards to religion, but hopes that Eleanor does not 'differ on any part of faith' (Church of England). As long as meekness and humility are observed...

1 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/13

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to family in Lincolnshire, before he intends to go to Nottingham and then take in Matlock

Glad he did not leave as he could reply sooner. He understands how busy Eleanor is and he feels for her; however he also feels his assistance would be useless and more of a hindrance. Hopes that her parties are a welcome relief. Laments that as no political gains were made in Cromwell's campaign near Horncastle, the details of it were omitted from the annals of history. Several relics remain to amateur collectors. Nearby are the Champion's estate and Tattershall Castle. Excellent brick edifice. There will be a lady waiting at Nottingham to accompany John to Matlock. Reassures Eleanor that...

4 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/14

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to relations in Nottingham, including references to the sale of her property at Berners Street and on the closing of the Royal Institution

Would have liked to have dined tête a tête in Berners Street with Eleanor. However, it may have made him depressed to see the house being emptied. John expresses attachment to places. This feeling, John feels is a reflection of his indolence (and aversion to packing). Sad regret that the Royal Institution is cloisng. Intended on attending a lot. Thanks Eleanor for offering to take notes at her next lecture. Describes Nottingham as one of the most picturesque places he's ever seen. Going to Matlock only for a day to pick up his niece due to family illness.

7 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/15

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on family bereavements suffered by Mrs Burnside, comprising the death of her mother's brother and those of two of Willingham Franklin's children, while in her care

Arrived at Matlock from Nottingham.  Gentleman (Mrs Burnside's mother's brother), whose illness he had previously mentioned, has died.  Mrs Burnside in distress as the death follows that of two of her grandchildren left in her care when the father James went to India.  Expects to remain for some days to attend the funeral.  Came to see his brother's remaining child.  Will write to his brother with news of the death but with positive news of the child's health.  Describes his enjoyment of walking in Matlock.  Refers to an issue about her lodgings: agrees with her implied misgivings about...

11 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/16

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, during his visit to family relations in Nottingham, including on his lack of desire to write , the funeral of Mrs Bunside's brother and on the end of her anxieties about Berners Street

Disappointed that the letter he sent from Matlock did not reach Eleanor on the day of her departure. His desire to write does not increase with practice. Where he enjoyed writing before he now finds it irksome. He hopes for some change in these sentiments. Family of friend want him to attend funeral on Wedneday as a mourner. He will stay until Mrs Burnside has overcome the shock of her brother's burial. Glad that Eleanor's anxieties regarding Berners Street are at an end.

16 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/17

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on attending the funeral of Mrs Burnside's brother in Nottingham

Committed friends' remains yesterday. Consolation that it was a crowded funeral and the grief was sincere. 'I have seldom witnessed scenes of this melancholy nature'. Mrs. Burnside is pious and patient. Hopes to be in London for Wednesday/Thursday.

19 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/18

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on date of his return to London, being sure that Mrs Burnside will get the support from an intimate friend in his place

Will not be back in London until 11pm on Wednesday. Intends drinking tea with Eleanor at either Portland Place or Gower Street - her choice. Sad to hear that Eleanor has had a relapse into bad health. Hopes London has helped. Happy that Mrs. Burnside is supporting herself. Sad he can't stay with his charge, but comforted that an intimate friend of hers is taking his place. Thanks Eleanor for lecture.

24 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/19

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, continuing their discussion about their religious opinions, maintaining he is not an enthusiast or bigot

Having breakfasted at a friend's, did not get letter until return from Portland Place; writing to acknowledge its receipt; corrects her mistake in supposing him a Methodist he cannot 'enter into the exclusive ideas and opinions which they entertain on the subjects of faith or election', nor does he go the lengths his friend Lady Lucy Barry has done in the letters he gave Eleanor. He had hoped the letters might have been introductory to his views on religion, not a full explanation of them; he is no enthusiast or bigot, but on the contrary, willing to allow everyone to "cherish their own...

[9 Jul 1823]

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/20

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, continuing their discussion about their religious opinions, denying he is a Methodist and saying they agree on essential points

Put off letter until he could indulge enough time. Finds writing in general irksome, but makes allowance due to Eleanor's nervous state. Eleanor is mistaken about Franklin's sentiments when it comes to religion. They agree on the 'essential points'. Franklin's duty is to live in conformity with the scripture. Feels it his duty not to associate with an infidel or an immoral person. Might not agree with philanthropy of Eleanor's associates but is not opposed to their differences. His friend John Hepburn takes a similar view. Does not wish to remove himself from their society. He has a duty to...

11 Jul [1823]

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/21

Letter from John Franklin to Eleanor Anne Porden, on learning about her long friendship with Henry Elliott

Receipt of note about her friend Mr Elliott; happy to cherish the affectionate esteem produced in her by her true friend; hopes to become his friend, in the same way Mr Elliott hopes to be Franklin's friend, "for her sake". Last two days he spent with his sisters having been happy, Eleanor's absence being the only thing to have not completed a happy family circle. Regrets not being able to be with her until 5 o'clock tomorrow; would like her to meet his brother's wife and family.

25 Jul 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/22

Letter from John Franklin to wife Eleanor Anne Franklin, while he is visiting his family in Lincolnshire before he sets off on his second Arctic land expedition

He is staying with Isabella and left Hannah yesterday. Hannah hopes to go to London which he thinks will do her and Mary good. Today he visited Mr Massingbird of Ormsby and "geologized" a little, visited a marl pit and collected a sample of pyrites (colloquially Brinkhill Gold): the specimen will be discussed with his Tutor, Dr. Fitton. Tomorrow to see friends at Spilsby and vicinity, then the next day to Mr Dashwood at Well Vale, and Saturday to Horncastle and on way to Mr Burnside's, Castle Gate, Nottingham. Flag should be three yards by two but she is to take advice from naval man if...

16 Dec 1824

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/23

Letter from John Franklin to wife Eleanor Anne Franklin, during his voyage to America to the start of his second Arctic land expedition, unaware of his wife's death

Describes pleasant voyage and commends the convenience of the ship, conduct of captain and officers and fellow passsengers.  Refers to fellow expediiton members, by initials only.  At the captain's request he read the Sunday service, which he amended out of deference to American passengers.  Wishes for his wife's recovery and that their daughter will be a source of pleasure.  Refers to Baker's kindness and hopes she will remain.  He gave each servant a sovereign when he left.  Has discussed with "the doctor" [John Richardson], which books and papers they will have sent out: lists items and...

1-15 Mar 1825

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/24

Letter from John Franklin to wife Eleanor Anne Franklin, describing his stay at New York before travelling further north on his second Arctic land expedition

22 Mar 1825, with postscripts 23 and 24 Mar 1825. Describes observations and activities during a week's residence in New York: commercial bustle; accessibility for ships; street pattern; social life; shops interspersed with large houses and churches.  Well received: has attended balls: Commodore Chauncery attentive. Comments on local clergyman's acquaintance with Hunter and his opinion that Hunter's narrative is authentic. With Richardson spoke about the expedition to a learned gathering at the Lyceum.  Dismissive of exhibits in the museum: suggests that his wife would be amused at one of...

22-24 Mar 1825

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/25

Letter from John Franklin to wife Eleanor Anne Franklin, describing his journey from New York northwards on his second Arctic land expedition

Date 26 Mar 1825 with postscript 7 Apr 1825. Describes journey by steamer from New York to Albany and reception by local dignatories.  Describes public buildings and visits to the state Parliament and to a museum.  Reports conversations with local people knowledgeable about the expedition.  Great Western canal ice-bound, so will need to proceed by stage coach. Relates information about Mr Moore who cheated Lord Grosvenor.   7 Apr: describes further journey: lists locations on the route, including Niagara Falls.  Discusses prospects for the next stage of the journey.  Dr Richardson and Mr...

26 Mar 1825-7 Apr 1825

D8760/F/FEP/1/1/26

Letter from John Franklin to wife Eleanor Anne Franklin, describing his journey northwards on his second Arctic land expedition, with note at end on receiving news of his wife's death

Reports safe arrival.  Discusses prospects for the next stage of the journey.  Describes aspects of Penetanguishene, accommodation and hosts.  Comments on the local officers' comfortable but secluded life.  Reflects on how it would be to live here.  If he had his library he would, after 3 or 4 years, be better informed for conversations with his wife.  Regrets that she was not with him on the journey from New York: lists sights that would have given her pleasure.  Describes impressions of Upper Canada and the experience of settlers. Had hoped to receive letters before leaving here...

22 Apr 1825

D8760/F/FEP/1/2

Letters from William Porden to his daughter Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1800-1808

D8760/F/FEP/1/2/1

Letter from William Porden to his daughter Eleanor Porden, praising her good lessons, written deliberately with great legibility

Written past twelve o'clock; glad to hear Mamma's leg is better; his not dining with her on Sunday as he has invitation to Hampstead, but will bring brace of partridges, part of which will be a reward for her good lessons'; promise to be at Trinderton to hear her read his letter; receipt of printed letter from Dr Cappe about inoculation of Mary Slater against smallpox, it being safe for Eleanor; thanks to be given to her sister for letter; his purchase of replacement tea pots; news on Westall family; possibly bringing cake for her.

12 Sep 1800

D8760/F/FEP/1/2/2

Letter from William Porden to his daughter Eleanor Anne Porden, on the respective merits of Homer and his translators, and on the failings of the Institution

Eleanor may be right to say Homer is superior to his translators, being the first poet in the world communicating his ideas in his own superior language: Pope's translation "embellished with beauties", which Porden found difficult in comparison with Cooper's plain story-telling, albeit frequently flat; when Eleanor translates the whole into literal English, he will versify it, which he will try when she has finished one book. The Institution is rapidly declining, and he wonders whether the new one of which she is a member will prove to be better; it woudl have been more useful as a school...

30 Jun 1808

D8760/F/FEP/1/3

Letters from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her sister Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1811-1821

D8760/F/FEP/1/3/1

Letter from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her sister Eleanor Anne Porden, concerning criticism of one of her poems on the grounds of indeliccay of its subject matter

Explains her objection to a piece of text relating to a sexual aspect of botany.  Makes a link to the purity of the mind and potential indelicacy of the subject matter

4 Nov 1811

D8760/F/FEP/1/3/2

Letter from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her sister Eleanor Anne Porden, on the death of D. Kay

They were summoned at about 4 o'clock to D. Kay, who was extremely ill , by his physician; his lawyer was sent for too and another physician; they have been watching by him since 5 o'clock, as all hope is over and he is dying. He has died since she left off; Margarte got there just before; John and Robert are sent for; it is like a dream; Joseph is sadly overcome and Margaret frantic.

Paper found loose at page 59 of William Porden commonplace book

May 1821

D8760/F/FEP/1/3/3

Letter from Sarah Henrietta Kay to her sister Eleanor Anne Porden, enclosing letter on death of D. Kay

The letter came enclosed with item which she ought to have had before 9 o'clock tonight but they sent to their house with other notes and her foolish people neither read the one to them nor sent yours. They have just returned, Margaret has gone back to Croydon and Robert did not arrive until it was all over; John is fully aware of his great loss, which is irreparable and will be likely to break up the business, as he has neither health nor nerve fot it; poor D. Kay was everything. it will put off Mr Kay's journey to Hastings again.

Underneath is a section on the final hours of D. Kay...

May 1821

D8760/F/FEP/1/4

Letters from William Porden Kay to his aunt Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1816

D8760/F/FEP/1/4/1

Letter from William Porden Kay to his aunt Eleanor Anne Porden, written when a young boy

Dated 13 May, no year given [but found with other material dated 1816-1817]

13 May [1816]

D8760/F/FEP/1/4/2

Letter from William Porden Kay to his aunt Eleanor Anne Porden, written when a young boy

Dated 30 Nov, no year given [but other letters were written by the Kay children to their grandparents on the same day in 1816]

30 Nov [1816]

D8760/F/FEP/1/5

Letters from Mary Anne Kay to her aunt Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1816

D8760/F/FEP/1/5/1

Letter from Mary Anne Kay to her aunt Eleanor Anne Porden, on her mother's not being home and the family's failure to call on Eleanor that day

Undated [found with other material of the Kay children dated 1816-1817]

[c1816]

D8760/F/FEP/1/5/2

Note in Greek capital letters from Mary Ann Kay to Eleanor Anne Porden

There is no date [found with other material of the Kay children dated 1816-1817]

[c1816]

D8760/F/FEP/1/6

Letters from Hannah Booth to her sister-in-law Eleanor Anne Franklin

 

1824

D8760/F/FEP/1/6/1

Letter from Hannah Booth to her sister-in-law Eleanor Anne Franklin, on family news in Lincolnshire, including comments criticising John Franklin on his decision to unertake his second Arctic land expedition

Reports well-being of her sister Wright after having given birth to a daughter.  Sends good wishes to family members.  Refers to little girls going to school, which will be of benefit to Betsey who is not robust.  Mary will soon finish her studies and return home: regrets the lack of suitable local teachers.  Expresses annoyance about her brother going once more to "pedestrianize the wild regions of the North".  Hopes he will be careful and avoid the agonies he suffered last time.  Hopes he will visit Lincoln before he leaves England.  Hopes she will enjoy being back in her own house after...

23 Jan 1824

D8760/F/FEP/1/7

Correspondence between Eleanor Anne Porden and friend Henry Elliott

 

1815-1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/1

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to unidentified man, possibly Henry Elliott, including on work and ideas for the Attic Chest

She is writing to him to stop him in thinking her negligent; the Attic notes are the first things she has done apart from making nightcaps since he last heard from her; her head has been nearly as bad as his and her eyes worse; she hopes he is quite recovered and that she will be well enough to dance with her on Friday, as she had to go to bed instead of a dance last night; he must not fail her on Wednesday. She will not be going to Winchester, as Mama is too uncertain to be left with servants, and her sister had told her she would not take charge of her; she hopes to make good use of the...

15 Feb 1815

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/2

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Henry Elliott, commenting on poetry she has read

She has finished "The Excursion" in better humour than when she started but still struggling to comprehend many parts of it and meaning and object of the whole; she would like him to read "Roderick" and "Charlemagne" to give her the pleasure to talk about it while it is still in her mind; she quotes lines of verse from the poems "Roderick "by Southey and "The Excursion" by Wordworth, and gives her opinions on them. She thanks him for Estrella, which he had transcribed, thinking the poem very respectable but with "fifty holes to pick in it". She heard a lecture on astronomy and its history...

16 Feb 1815

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/3

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Henry Elliott, on her visit to the battlefield of Waterloo a year after the battle

Visit to the battlefield of Waterloo with journey through Waterloo and surrounding thick forest. Description of the battlefield. "It has left a deep impression in the hearts of the Belgians, who seem to look upon the English as their friends. They hate the Dutch and would have preferred our rule. In France we are feared but not loved. It would be impossible". [Sent with letter of 11 Nov 1816]

18 Oct 1816

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/4

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Henry Elliott, back in London after her travels to the Continent

She considers a letter from Waterloo as rather a debt to him, after all the trouble taken by him on her foolish poem, but now it is and brought home, she fears he might scarcely think it worth reading. Comparison of carriages at Brussels, said to have belonged to Buonaparte, mentioning M. Van Kamper Noten and Bullock (the latter said by locals to have been that of his secretary); they are not sorry to be back home again, with her being disappointed in the beauty of the country in the Netherlands and France in comparison with England, with its churches being the equal of those on the...

11 Nov 1816

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/5

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Henry Elliott, on preparing pieces for the Attic Chest

She is afraid that Mr Elliott has lost his relish for the Attic Chest so that it will be unwelcome for her to ask him to copy an "accompanying scrap" so as to make it look as if were produced by the second Scriblerus; her muse had been idle, but this morning the idea of a Scriblerus Epistle popped into her head; hopefully he will do it for next Tuesday. She has only been "Attically idle", but she has set to work in earnest on her poem about Richard [Coeur de Lion], in the middle of the second book: she fears no one else will be interested in the work. Followed by passage to be copied...

1 Mar 1817

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/6

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Henry Ellliot, on her having found a document she should have returned to him and then on her having found a poem

 

12 Jul 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/7

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Henry Elliott, telling him of her intention to marry Captain John Franklin, with whom he will hopefully become a friend

She was meant to have sent Mr Finch's letter, but her sister wanted to see it, so it has been left with her; she encloses a letter for a friend at Berne to be used as a letter of introduction to M. Zeerleder, a valuable acquaintance. She has seen so little from him in the last 12 months, but it would be unjust for their long friendship if she withheld the confidence that she was uniting herself with Captain Franklin, fulfulling what would have been her father's most earnest wish with regard to her, "the noncompletion of which, was indeed his greatest anxiety in the later months of his life...

21 Jul 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/7/8

Letter from Henry Elliott to Eleanor Anne Porden, sending his congratulations to her on her intended marriage with John Franklin, of whom he has a favourable impression

Harried and worried as he is that day, he scarcely knows how to reply to her note: but he assures that nothing can prevent him from his sending his congratulations to her; she knows him too well not to be told how much good he wishes her and how agreeable it was to receive the new confidentially from her; all he has seen of Captain Franklin has made a favourable impression on him, as well as (only regarding looks) his sister; he has no doubt Franklin wrote the book himself, and the heart and dispositon which it shows could not be possessed by a man "with whom one ought to fear entering on...

22 Jul 1823

D8760/F/FEP/1/8

Letters of Eleanor Anne Porden from other correspondents

The letters had been arranged in alphabetical order of correspondent. They are generally from people who moved in the same literary circles or are the recipients of her poetry, including the librarian of King George IV.

1808-1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/1

Letter from John Linnell Bond to Eleanor Anne Porden, enclosing a few lines and referring to the birth of a daughter to Eleanor's sister

Enclosing a few lines on subject she proposed the last time they met, although he belives them deficient in the expected wit and humour; he will be dining at Berners Street next Sunday, but asks whether he wants him to transcribe for her before then; congratulates her on becoming an aunt; asks to be told how the mother and young lady are doing and also how Mr Kay looks since he has become a father.

Dated only 11 Feb, but the context of the birth of the Kays' first child [Mary Anne] makes the year 1808.

11 Feb [1808]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/2

Letter from John Linnell Bond to Eleanor Porden, returning book and acknowledging receipt of Valentine poem from her

Returning book Cambuscan, thanking her father for opportunity to read it; happy to hear how Mrs Kay and "the fair stranger" are; receipt of Eleanor's Valentine, which he finds extremely well expressed, particularly the last stanza; he likes the paper as well.

The note is only dated 16 Feb, but reference to Mrs Kay's child suggests the year is 1808 [her first child Mary Anne was born on 9 Feb 1808].

16 Feb [1808]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/3

Letter from John Linnell Bond to Eleanor Anne Porden, enclosing books, initially in very over-blown literary language

First page in language Bond describes as "from the Regions of Allegory"; encloses all books requested except "Scriptores Graeci"; he presumes she is intending to follow her studies and make progress with the assistance of Mrs Palmer; the heat of the weather on Thursday must have made him appear as an indifferent listener to the poem; hopes her mother finds the country air beneficial to her health.

18 Jul 1808

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/4

Letter from John Linnell Bond to his friend Eleanor Anne Porden, on buildings in Stamford, including ink sketches of views of town and church architectural features

He writes to say that he has been very keen, since returning to Stamford ,to begin a description of the churches there but he has been ‘a great degree deterred’ by the difficulty in rendering an account which conveys a correct image of their architectural forms to Eleanor’s mind. He has been afraid that the subject would be too dry and the subject would afford very little pleasure ‘’to an imagination that has ……..been pampered almost to fastidiousness with the rich fruits of the Attic Chest’’. He goes on to describe how the number of churches in Stamford has been reduced and names the...

3 May 1812

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/5

Draft letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to unnamed gentleman [John Linnell Bond], including on verses written in imitation of poets of the day, the Kay family and the new theatre at Drury Lane

Since he left London she has been busy, which her father could verify; she has finished the first volume of Caesar's Commentaries without too much help from the French translation; she would ask his opinion of the volume of "Rejected Addresses", done in imitation of leading poets of the day, in the hope he will come to town in spite of his fascination with the "Stamford Belles"; Mrs Kay and family returned from Ramsgate a fortnight ago, although house not ready, with children quartered in the city having caught colds; Mary Anne is grown, still a formal little woman, William has not grown...

[late 1812]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/6

Draft note in Greek by Eleanor Anne Porden to John Linnell Bond

With brief memorandum at end in English, asking him to hopefully call that evening, bring the note with him. Reference to the Flaxmans in Greek.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/7

Letter from John Flaxman to Eleanor Anne Porden, on hoping to be at the next Attic Society meeting on 14 July, in mock poetic style

Flaxman titles her "Editress and President. A.S., A.B.C. & O'P_X.Y.Z, &c.&c.&c" [A.S. stands for Attic Society]

29 Jun 1813

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/8

Letter from William Gifford to Eleanor Anne Porden, apologising for not having read a piece of poetry

Being unwell he has not been able to read the canto; he hopes to get better soon, when he will receive it back . It is now a quarter of year since he got out of his carriage, except for one occasion at Somerset House. Her father has said he is very ill, otherwise he would have asked him to dine on Thursday . He thought her last book very good.

Dated Tuesday night. Paper watermarked 1817, but the year is possibly 1822, the year when her father, William Porden, died, and the last book referred to could be "Couer de Lion".

William Gifford is likely to be the satirist and editor of the...

[1822]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/9

Letter from Mrs Goodenough to Eleanor Anne Porden, presenting her compliments and thanking her for her beautiful poem in aid of the Bedford Free School

Written at Berners Street. The note is only dated Wednesday, but the poem was written on 1 May 1819.

[May 1819]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/10

Draft letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Miss Richardson, relating to the latter's translations of stories in French and their possible publication

Prevented from replying earlier by visit of friend; both she and her father admire the fluency of her translations of stories in French, but they are not close enough, so they recommend that she revises them where they have marked in pencil; they will try to promote their success, but she may have over-rated the Pordens' "powerful interest"; she suggests some of the more respectable magazines to apply to; she herself had applied to the Gentleman's Magazine for a poem to published but had received no acknowledgement, even though the poem was published; remembrances to Miss Richardson's...

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/11

Letter from S. Sikes to Eleanor Anne Porden, seemingly on an announcement of her proposed engagement, written during the last illness of Eleanor's father, William Porden

He has opportunity to send letter to Miss Cotton tomorrow, so he uses it to write to Eleanor's, which charmed him with her confidence, which he will repay with equal candour; his heart "palpitated at the commencement of your detail", worried that the disclosure so formally announced must produce something painful, when reassured to the contrary, he was more pleased than surprised by her father's change of sentiments; his increasing infirmities and latest attacks on his constitution seom to make him consider her future welfare rarther than his "little selfishness" in wanting the company and...

2-3 Aug 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/12

Letter from Charles R. Sumner to Eleanor Porden on delay in receipt of book "Couer de Lion" to be presented to King George IV

Receipt of letter of 12th accompanying two copies of her new poem "Couer de Lion" has only reached him that day; whether delay through her publishers or some mistake in delivery at Carlton House, he apologises for seeming neglect; he will lay copy intended for his Majesty [George IV] before him with as little delay as possible; thanks for her attention in favouring him with a copy and he will place it in his library. [Charles Richard Sumner was the Royal Librarian of King George IV.]

24 Jun 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/13

Letter from Eleanor Porden to Charles R. Summers on non-delivery of her book, "Couer de Lion" at Carlton House for presentation to King George IV

Very sorry to hear of delay in delivery of "Couer de Lion"; her servant left it at Carlton House on the 11th and not sent on the 13th "on account of the Drawing Room"; she enquired twice the week before and heard he was in the country but had returned to town; she had no doubt that the books had reached his hands immediately; writing to exculpate herself and her publisher from blame; compliments of father.

26 Jun 1822

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/14

Letter from Louisa Thomson to Eleanor Anne Porden, relating to the arrangements for a meeting of Eleanor and Captain John Franklin

On it not being Doctor Thomson's fault that Captain Franklin was deprived of the pleasure of dining with her on Tuesday; it is almost certain that he will make another voyage to the Polar regions, and he would be happy to facilitate an interview whenever convenient to both parties.

Text in letter only dated Thursday evening, but endorsed "Mrs Doctor Thomson to Eleanor, Jany. 6 1819"

6 Jan 1819

D8760/F/FEP/1/8/15

Letter from Anna Vardill to Eleanor Anne Porden, written by Anna while she was in North Yorkshire

Congratulations on Mrs Porden being better; her own mother not changed; description of her travels last week, including references to Wharfedale, Bolton Abbey, Malhamdale, Skipton; there are also a number of literary references to Lord Byron and Walter Scott.

21 Jul 1819

D8760/F/FEP/2

Legal papers of Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1823-1828

D8760/F/FEP/2/1

Deed of settlement on the marriage of Captain John Franklin and Eleanor Anne Porden

Between (1) John Franklin, esquire, captain of the Royal Navy, (2) Eleanor Anne Porden of Berners Street, Middlesex, spinster, (3) Francis Bedford of Camberwell, Surrey, architect, and Henry Sellwood of Horncastle, Lincolnshire, esquire, reciting will of Eleanor's father, William Porden of Berners Street, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, architect, dated 8 April 1821, relating to the leasehold properties of Nos. 62-66 Upper Berkeley Street, Portman Sqaure, parish of St Marylebone, Middlesex, and books, manuscripts, print books of prints and drawings

15 Aug 1823

D8760/F/FEP/2/2

Copy of the last will and testament of Eleanor Anne Franklin, with letters of administration

1) Copy will of Eleanor Anne Franklin, wife of Captain John Franklin, reciting provisions of the pre-marriage settlemnt dated 15 Aug 1823, relating to the leasehold properties of Nos. 62-66 Upper Berkeley Street bequeathed to her by her father, and also the books, manuscripts, print books of prints and drawings, granting them to her husband and appointing Francis Bedford, architect, and Henry Sellwood, esquire (also trustees of the marriage settlement), executors, witnessed by Joseph Kay and Elizabeth Appleton, dated 10 Feb 1825.

2) Letters of adminstration of the goods of Eleanor Ann...

1825-1828

D8760/F/FEP/3

Manuscripts in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1809-1823

D8760/F/FEP/3/1

Manuscript writings collected together under "Peter Plod"

Verse and letters on the romance of Peter Plod, a bachelor potato merchant, and Polly Brown, for whom Miss Porden acts as some sort of go-between; some items addressed to Miss Brown or Miss Porden of Berners Street. Two sheets watermarked 1806 and 1807, two postmarked for 14 Mar 1808 and Feb 1809

[1809]

D8760/F/FEP/3/2

Manuscript writings collected together under "The Correspondence of Malcolm Graeme and Ellen Douglas"

Comprising draft verse mostly in the hand of Eleanor Porden; seemingly in the spirit of The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott, which was published in 1810; dates of 21 June (Stirling Castle), 30 June 1810, addressed to William Porden, Berners Street, and 19 &21 July 1810 (Swainston); one item dated 21 June "To Miss Douglas", signed "McF." addressed to Miss Porden (in different hand)

[1810]

D8760/F/FEP/3/3

Manuscript writings collected together under "The Floral Senate"

Mostly verses in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden, some of which relate to the Battle of Waterloo; including two letters or drafts addressed to Mary [?Ann Flaxman] by Eleanor. 30 March and 11 April 1812 (the latter very much concerning the recently knighted Humphrey Davy), two addressed to her father at Berners Street, one dated , and draft letter to her sister [Sarah Henrietta Kay]

[1811-1815]

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/1

Draft of letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to her sister Sarah Henrietta Kay responding to her sister's criticism of one of Eleanor's poems on the subject of botany and its sexual aspects

Undated, but the original letter from her sister is dated 4 Nov 1811

[Nov 1811]

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/2

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Mary [Flaxman], on poems written by Anna Vardill and Mr Hindley

Including references to receipt of poem from Miss Vardill entitled the Pleasures of Human Life, partly read out to her by Mr Hindley, who had been busy extending and sending off his own poem on Catholic emancipation to the printers.

30-31 Mar 1812

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/3

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to Mary [Flaxman], on lecture by Sir Humphrey Day and on his being presented to the Prince Regent and knighted

 

11 Apr 1812

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/4

Letter from Eleanor Anne Porden to unnamed man [possibly Henry Elliott], on proceedings of the Attic Chest meeting of the evening before and on a lecture by Mr Brande on animal chemistry

Including reference to Mr Vignoles as author of one of the poems. Addressed at end to Diogenes.

18 Jul 1812

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/5

Poem entitled "Enigma, To Mr Porden"

44 lines. First two lines "Since first the world was made , we find That Fashion still has ruled Mankind".

Addressed on back to William Porden, Esquire.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/6

Poem with first line "Oh many an age shall watch in vain" on paper with address, Miss Porden, Berners Street

Poem of 10 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/7

Drafts of poem on the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo

Undated, but possibly wriiten when or after she visited the site of the Battle of Waterloo in 1816. Several sheets of paper watermarked 1812.

[1816]

D8760/F/FEP/3/3/8

Notes on science of electricity and chemistry

Including references to the Royal Institution, Sir Humphrey Day [knighted 1812], Volta, Galvanism, iodine, alkalies, sodium and potassium, and ammonia

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/3/4

Manuscript of poem "The Veils" by Eleanor Anne Porden

 

[1815]

D8760/F/FEP/3/5

Manuscript account by Eleanor Anne Porden, of conversation with Miss Vardill on the supernatural, imagination, pleasure in the face of fear, and creativity in the unconscious state

 

14 Jun 1815

D8760/F/FEP/3/6

Drafts (2) of humorous verse written by Eleanor Anne Porden on the problems John Franklin is having in trying to write up account of his first Arctic land expedition

 

Dec 1822

D8760/F/FEP/3/6/1

Humorous verse written by Eleanor Anne Porden on the problems John Franklin is having in trying to write up account of his first Arctic land expedition

 

Dec 1822

D8760/F/FEP/3/6/2

Humorous verse written by Eleanor Anne Porden on the problems John Franklin is having in trying to write up account of his first Arctic land expedition

 

Dec 1822

D8760/F/FEP/3/7

Valentine poem for John Franklin based on the story of "Miss Greenstockings"

 

14 Feb 1823

D8760/F/FEP/3/7/1

Draft of Valentine poem as if written by a native girl of North America to the European lover who has deserted her, intended for John Franklin by Eleanor Anne Porden

Written as if from the Coppermine River in North America

14 Feb 1823

D8760/F/FEP/3/7/2

Fair hand version of Valentine poem as if written by a native girl of North America to the European lover who has deserted her, intended for John Franklin by Eleanor Anne Porden

Addressed to Captain Franklin at 60 Frith Street, Soho;

Based on "Miss Green Stockings", whom Franklin met during his first Arctic land expedition: in disguised handwriting, including made-up signature for "Miss Green Stockings" using symbols.

14 Feb 1823

D8760/F/FEP/3/8

Sonnet by Eleanor Anne Porden entitled "Nay! Nay! I'll tax my brains no more"

Written in mild mockery of John Franklin, as he was attempting to write up for publication the narrative of his first Arctic land expedition (1819-1822)

[early 1823]

D8760/F/FEP/3/9

Short epigram in Latin "Si Sol Splendescat Maria purificante / Major erit glacies postea, quam fuit ante"

2 lines in ink; one added in pencil "aliter Imber erit fuit tantus post pascham quam fuit ante"

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/3/10

Poem in Italian by Eleanor Anne Porden, addressed to William Porden from Lichfield

Post stamped 19 Jan 1815; first line "Oh caro obietto di mio amore"

18 Jan 1815

D8760/F/FEP/3/11

Neat hand written notes on electricity and magnetism, including diagrams at start

Includes references to Professor Orsted of Copenhagen, conduction of Voltaic battery and experiment by Mr Brande

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/3/12

Typed copy of poem by Eleanor Anne Porden entitled "In Rouen Cathedral", 3 Sep 1821

At top it states that the original is missing

[early 20th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/3/13

Notes of research of Eleanor Anne Porden relating to her poem Coeur de Lion

 

[c1820]

D8760/F/FEP/3/13/1

Book of notes taken by Eleanor Anne Porden as part of her historical research for her book `Coeur de Lion'

 

[c1820]

D8760/F/FEP/3/13/2

Draft verses in pencil by Eleanor Anne Porden for her book `Coeur de Lion'

Found inside research note book

[c1820]

D8760/F/FEP/3/14

Manuscript copy of poem entitled "On Christmas Day", believed to be by Eleanor Anne Porden

Poem dated only 25 Dec; seemingly published in the Morning Herald; with note on later hand saying that believed to have benn composed by E.A. Porden, afterwards E.A Franklin and it was in her writing.

Found inside ppublished volume "The Veils" by Eleanor Anne Porden (as at D8760/F/FEP/4/2)

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/4

Published works and writings of Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1815-1822

D8760/F/FEP/4/1

The Veils; or The Triumph of Constancy: A Poem in 6 Books, by Eleanor Anne Porden

Published by John Murray, London, 290 pages

Copy presented to Captain Franklin from his obliged friend the Author", Jan 1823; later the personal copy of Eleanor I. Franklin.

Bookplate of Philip Lyttelton Gell on inside front cover, with opposite it, a card of P.E.C. d'Halma apologising to Mr Porden and his ladies for having kept The Veils for a long time (in French)

1815

D8760/F/FEP/4/2

The Veils; or The Triumph of Constancy: A Poem in 6 Books, by Eleanor Anne Porden

Published by John Murray, London, 290 page

Given by Eleanor Anee Porden to her mother Mrs Pordern; later given to Eleanor F. Wiseman by her father [John Philip Gell], Christmas 1873.

1815

D8760/F/FEP/4/3

Volumes of Coeur de Lion, or The Third Crusade; A Poem in Sixteen Books

 

1822

D8760/F/FEP/4/3/1

Coeur de Lion, or The Third Crusade; A Poem in Sixteen Books: Volume 1, Books 1-8, by Eleanor Anne Porden

Published by G. and W.B. Whittaker, London, 464 pages, plus 28 pages of title, dedication and ode to KIng George IV and preface.

Personal copy of Eleanor Anne Porden, June 1822; with pencil memorandum by Ph. G. [Philip Lyttelton Gell] that she was the wife of John Franklin and that the copy was his mother's [Eleanor Isabella Gell]; bookplate of Philip Lyttelton Gell on inside front cover.

1822

D8760/F/FEP/4/3/2

Coeur de Lion, or The Third Crusade; A Poem in Sixteen Books: Volume 2, Books 9-16, by Eleanor Anne Porden

Published by G. and W.B. Whittaker, London, 418 pages.

Given by the author to her friend Captain Franklin, Jan 1823; later given by John Philip Gell to her daughter [-in-law] Edith Lyttelton Gell, June 1892; bookplate of Philip Lyttelton Gell on inside front cover.

1822

D8760/F/FEP/4/3/3

Coeur de Lion, or The Third Crusade; A Poem in Sixteen Books: Volume 2, Books 9-16, by Eleanor Anne Porden

Published by G. and W.B. Whittaker, London, 418 pages.

With bound in at end, Richard, Coeur de Lion, "comedie" in 3 acts, by Sedaine (in French), performed for the first time in Paris by "les Comediens Italiens", 21 Oct 1784, 32 uncut pages.

1822

D8760/F/FEP/4/4

Pamphlets of printed poems by Eleanor Anne Porden

 

1819-1821

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/1

Ode Addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Belgrave on his Marriage with the Honourable Lady Elizabeth Mary Leveson Gower, 16 Sep 1819 [by Eleanor Anne Porden]

Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 16 pages.

1819

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/2

Ode Addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Belgrave on his Marriage with the Honourable Lady Elizabeth Mary Leveson Gower, 16 Sep 1819 [by Eleanor Anne Porden]

Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 16 pages; with two slight amendments in ink.

Copy of Miss Thomson from the author, London, 2 Oct 1819.

1819

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/3

Ode Addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Belgrave on his Marriage with the Honourable Lady Elizabeth Mary Leveson Gower, 16 Sep 1819 [by Eleanor Anne Porden]

Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 16 pages; with two slight amendments in ink

Copy of Eleanor Anne Porden, 13 Oct 1819.

1819

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/4

Poem entited "A Voluntary Contribution in aid of the Bedford Free School, 1 May 1819"

Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London

1819

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/5

Ode on the Coronation of His Most Gracious Majesty George the Fourth on July 19 1821, by Miss [Eleanor Anne] Porden

Printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 16 pages, with two proof pages numbered 17-18 containing two stanzas to be inserted into ode (which are included in the pamphlet)

1821

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/6

Poem entited "Charity: A Second Contribution in aid of the Bedford Free School, Argyll Rooms", 5 May 1821 [by Eleanor Anne Porden]

Copy given to Eleanor Isabella Franklin by her Aunt Kay, 20 Feb 1845.

Printed for the author by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London.

1821

D8760/F/FEP/4/4/7

Poem entited "Charity: A Second Contribution in aid of the Bedford Free School, Argyll Rooms", 5 May 1821 [by Eleanor Anne Porden]

Printed for the author by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London

1821

D8760/F/FEP/4/5

Compendium volume of short works by Eleanor Anne Porden, with notice of obituary

Containing (i) The Arctic Expeditions: A Poem, 1818, published by John Murray, London, 30 pages; (ii) Ode Addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Belgrave on his Marriage with the Honourable Lady Elizabeth Mary Leveson-Gower, 16 Sep 1819, printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 16 pages; (iii) Ode on the Coronation of His Most Gracious Majesty George the Fourth on July 19 1821, printed by Cox and Baylis, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 16 pages; (v) The Monthly Magazine, No. 408, 1 April 1825, pages 193-296, with obituary notice...

1818-1825

D8760/F/FEP/4/6

Printed copies or proofs of short works by Eleanor Anne Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/4/6/1

Printed proof of poem entitled "The Legend of St Fiacre; found in an old Folio in the Library of one of the Monasteries, abbattees dans la Revolution", by Mis Porden [Eleanor Anne Porden]

64 lines in 16 stanzas, with author's note on alleged provenance of the manuscript

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/4/6/2

Printed proof of poem entitled "Lines Written on the platform at Berne, October 1818", by Eleanor Porden

64 lines in 3 stanzas

[c1818]

D8760/F/FEP/4/6/3

Printed cuttings and proof of poem entitled "A voluntary contribution in aid of the Bedford Free School, May 1 1819" by Miss Porden [Eleanor Anne Porden]

The two newscuttings have on the reverse items on (1) account of political instability in Greece on reverse, with particular reference to Parga, and (2) account of reform meetings and disturbances at Liverpool, Manchester [following Peterloo] and Wakefield

[1819]

D8760/F/FEP/5

The Attic Chest, comprising writings gathered together and edited by Eleanor Anne Porden and her father William Porden, with drafts and related papers

There are 41 booklets of the Attic Chest. There are 4 bundles of other material relating to the Attic Chest, which include what would seem to be drafts or rejected literary works, and uncut pages of a book on botany. The papers were given by Eleanor's niece, Henrietta Emilia Alice Kaye, to Eleanor's grandson, Philip Lttelton Gell, during the 1870s (see D8760/F/FEP/5/44/10 for extracted latter).

1808-1818

D8760/F/FEP/5/1

The Attic Chest, Season 1, Nos. 1-4

For meetings on 27 Dec 1808, 10 Jan 1809, 24 Jan 1809 and 7 Feb 1809

27 Dec 1808-7 Feb 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/2

The Attic Chest, Season 1, Nos. 5-6

 

21 Feb 1809-7 Mar 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/3

The Attic Chest, Season 1, Nos. 7-9

For meetings on 21 March, 4 April and 2 May 1809

21 Mar 1809-2 May 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/4

The Attic Chest, Season 1, Nos. 10-12

For meetings on 16 May, 30 May and 14 July 1809

16 May 1809-14 Jul 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/5

The Attic Chest, Season 2, Nos. 13-15

For meetings on 19 Dec 1809, 2 Jan 1810 and 16 Jan 1810

19 Dec 1809-16 Jan 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/6

The Attic Chest, Season 2, Nos. 16-18

For meetings on 30 Jan, 13 and 27 Feb 1810

30 Jan 1810-27 Feb 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/7

The Attic Chest, Season 2, Nos. 19-20

 

13-27 Mar 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/8

The Attic Chest, Season 2, Nos. 21-23

 

10 Apr 1810-8 May 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/9

The Attic Chest, Season 2, Nos. 24-26

For meetings on 22 May, 5 June and 19 June 1810

22 May 1810-19 Jun 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/10

The Attic Chest, Season 2, Nos. 27-28

 

3-14 Jul 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/11

The Attic Chest, Season 3, Nos. 29-31

For meetings on 20 Nov, 5 Dec and 18 Dec 1810

20 Nov 1810-18 Dec 1810

D8760/F/FEP/5/12

The Attic Chest, Season 3, Nos. 32-34

For meetings on 15 Jan, 30 Jan and 12 Feb 1811

15 Jan 1811-12 Feb 1811

D8760/F/FEP/5/13

The Attic Chest, Season 3, Nos. 35-37

For meetings on 26 February, 12 March and 26 March 1811

26 Feb 1811-26 Mar 1811

D8760/F/FEP/5/14

The Attic Chest, Season 3, Nos. 38-42

For meetings on 9 April, 23 April, 7 May, 21 May and 4 June 1811

9 Apr 1811-4 Jun 1811

D8760/F/FEP/5/15

The Attic Chest, Season 3, Nos. 43-45

For meetings on 18 June, 2 July and 16 July 1811

18 Jun 1811-16 Jul 1811

D8760/F/FEP/5/16

The Attic Chest, Season 4, Nos. 46-49

For meetings on 8 Jan, 22 Jan, 5 Feb and 19 Feb 1812

8 Jan - 19 Feb 1812

D8760/F/FEP/5/17

The Attic Chest, Season 4, Nos. 50-54

For meetings on 4 March, 18 March, 1 April, 15 April and 29 April 1812

14 Mar 1812-29 Apr 1812

D8760/F/FEP/5/18

The Attic Chest, Season 4, Nos. 55-57

For meetings 13 May, 27 May and 17 June 1812

13 May 1812-17 Jun 1812

D8760/F/FEP/5/19

The Attic Chest, Season 5, Nos. 58-59

 

17-31 Mar 1813

D8760/F/FEP/5/20

The Attic Chest, Season 5, Nos. 60-62

For meetings 14 Apr, 28 Apr and 13 May 1813

14 Apr 1813-13 May 1813

D8760/F/FEP/5/21

The Attic Chest, Season 5, Nos. 63-64

 

26 May 1813-9 Jun 1813

D8760/F/FEP/5/22

The Attic Chest, Season 5, Nos. 65-66

 

25 Jun 1813-14 Jul 1813

D8760/F/FEP/5/23

The Attic Chest, Season 6 No. 67

 

22 Feb 1814

D8760/F/FEP/5/24

The Attic Chest, Season 6, No. 68

 

9 Mar 1814

D8760/F/FEP/5/25

The Attic Chest, Season 7, No. 69

 

7 Dec 1814

D8760/F/FEP/5/26

The Attic Chest, Season 7, No. 70

 

21 Dec 1814

D8760/F/FEP/5/27

The Attic Chest, Season 7, No. 71

 

22 Feb 1815

D8760/F/FEP/5/28

The Attic Chest, Season 7, No. 72

 

8 Mar 1815

D8760/F/FEP/5/29

The Attic Chest, Season 7, No. 73

 

22 Mar 1815

D8760/F/FEP/5/30

The Attic Chest, Season 8, Nos. 74-75

 

6-20 Dec 1815

D8760/F/FEP/5/31

The Attic Chest, Season 8, Nos. 76-77

 

30 Jan 1816-14 Feb 1816

D8760/F/FEP/5/32

The Attic Chest, Season 8, Nos. 78-79

 

28 Feb 1816-13 Mar 1816

D8760/F/FEP/5/33

The Attic Chest, Season 8, Nos. 80-81

 

27 Mar 1816-24 Apr 1816

D8760/F/FEP/5/34

The Attic Chest, Season 8, Nos. 82-83

 

8-22 May 1816

D8760/F/FEP/5/35

The Attic Chest, Season 8, Nos. 84-85

 

5 Jun 1816-15 Jul 1816

D8760/F/FEP/5/36

The Attic Chest, Season 8, No. 86

 

27 Mar 1816-22 May 1816

D8760/F/FEP/5/37

The Attic Chest, Season 9, Nos. 87-88

 

4-18 Mar 1817

D8760/F/FEP/5/38

The Attic Chest, Season 9, Nos. 89-90

 

15-29 Apr 1817

D8760/F/FEP/5/39

The Attic Chest, Season 9, Nos. 91-92

 

3 Apr 1817-27 May 1817

D8760/F/FEP/5/40

The Attic Chest, Season 9, Nos. 93

 

10 Jun 1817

D8760/F/FEP/5/41

The Attic Chest, Season 10, Nos. 94-95

 

19 May 1818- 2 Jun 1818

D8760/F/FEP/5/42

Collection of writings and other papers gathered together for the Attic Chest, including items not written up in final collections for meetings, mostly by Eleanor Anne Porden or William Porden

Including newscutting of Arctic expedition and meeting new tribe of Esquimaux, 1818; play called The Lunatics, performed at Positive House; letters signed by Electromagus, Pertinax Townly, Atticus Scriblerus; draft pages for more plays

[c1803-1818]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/1

Draft introduction to the Attic Chest, meeting No. 4

Introducing the works to be put forward to the meeting

7 Feb 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/2

Draft introduction to the Attic Chest, meeting No. 68

Including references to communications from Positive House from Electromagus, Sir Pertinax Townly and Mr Beauclerc

19 Mar 1814

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/3

Draft introduction to the Attic Chest, 6th Season, meeting No. 74

Including references to the work of Electromagus under the patronage of Lord Aircastle, and the poetry of Mrs Bustleton

6 Dec 1815

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/4

Manuscript poem, first line "The Ram, the Bull, the heavenly twins", in hand of William Porden

6 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/5

Manuscript poem entitled "Elegy on a Mouse by E.A. Porden"

10 lines. The handwriting would suggest that this was written when she was a young child.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/6

Manuscript poem, first line "Fair maid to you this box I send", in hand of Eleanor Porden

20 lines, including reference to gift being sent in a "tea chest"; on reverse, drafts of poems "On the Portable Pens", 5 lines, and "How spring with verdure clothes …, 10 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/7

Manuscript poem, entitled "To the Attic Chest", in hand of Eleanor Porden

35 lines; on paper addressed to William Porden, Esq, Berners Street, Oxford Street, London, postmarked 14 Oct 1808, Cambridge

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/8

Draft manuscript poem, "On sultry Afric's sandy waste", in hand of Eleanor Porden

55 lines; with [?] attendance list on reverse, comprising 19 in total, "4 selves, 1 Kay, 3 Flaxman, 1 Vardill, 1 Elliott, 2 Taylors, 1 Firth, 2 Richardsons, 2 Phillips's, 2 Bedfords" ,

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/9

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Ye muses seize your golden lyres", in hand of Eleanor Porden

40 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/10

Draft manuscript poem, first line "A woman's praise so sages say", in hand of Eleanor Porden

56 lines, 7 stanzas; short postscript says that "not in regular order"; tells recipient, Miss Vardill, not to use them if she doesn't like them

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/11

Manuscript poem, first line "The song of the birds has awakened the day", in hand of Eleanor Porden

20 stanzas

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/12

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Admiring gaze, where gaily blows", in hand of Eleanor Porden

3 stanzas; addressed to William Porden Esq., 1 Norland Place, 59 Berners Street, Oxford Street, London, with postmarks for 4 Oct [?1803]

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/13

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Norlanda rules a fairy land"

5 sheets, c502 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/14

Draft manuscript poem, first line "What though the garb of winter keep"

32 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/15

Draft manuscript poem, first line, "Brittannia sovereign ruler of the main," signed Anonymous, in hand of Eleanor Porden

50 lines, 7 crossed out, other crossings out; refers to death of Pitt

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/16

Draft manuscript poem, entitled " On the Myrtle", signed Myrtillus, in hand of Eleanor Porden

32 lines, some crossings out

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/17

Draft manuscript poem, first two lines, "Sweet is the sleep of innocence, that sleep which peasants can enjoy, unknown to kings", in hand of Eleanor Porden

25 lines, some crossings out;

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/18

Draft manuscript poem, entitled "The Old Enigma's answered by a new one", identified as being by Eleanor Anne Porden

31 lines, some crossings out; instruction that if it is printed, it is only to be by Miss Porden; with address Berners Street, time Wednesday, morning

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/19

Draft manuscript poem, entitled by William Porden as "The Parade at Bern by Miss Porden", in hand of Eleanor Porden

49 lines spread over 4 sides of paper, few crossings out: addressed to Porden, Esq."à la Couronne"

1818

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/20

Manuscript note about the City of Berne, capital of Switzerland and the surrounding Bernese Alps, in hand of Eleanor Porden

One and half sides of paper

[1818]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/21

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Three days of chequer'd smiles to tears", about Berne and surroundings, in hand of Eleanor Porden

16 lines, some crossings out; using similar phrases as in manuscript note on Berne

[1818]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/22

Draft manuscript poem, first line,"Mid scenes where beauty reigns around", in hand of Elenor Porden

13 lines, 1 crossed out; poem about love; on back of paper addressed to Miss Porden

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/23

Draft manuscript Valentine poems, two entitled "Oh wither does Ictrius stray" and "Ah Moth in vain thy words deceitful say", and one addressed to Donald by Amanda, in hand of Eleanor Porden

45 lines in total, some crossings out; reference to it being a leap year; on paper addressed to W. Porden, Esq, 59 Berners Street

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/24

Manuscript Valentine poem, from Carlos to Ellen

30 lines

14 Feb 1813

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/25

Manuscript poem, entitled "To Stella", signed Moth

Addressed to Miss Porden. 8 lines. Marked in pencil as "Not for the Chest".

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/26

Manuscript poem, first line "Let others sings of deeds of Arms"

14 lines.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/27

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Mark where you marble pillars stands", in hand of Eleanor Porden

16 lines, 1 crossed out.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/28

Manuscript poem, first line "View not this ancient altar with disdain", in hand of Eleanor Porden

11 lines.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/29

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Within these walls …"

8 lines. In pencil, with several amendments.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/30

Manuscript poem, entitled "On the death of Mr. Fox", signed J. O'Keefe

8 lines. On paper partially addressed to William [Porden], 59 [Berners Street]. Watermarked Sep 1808.

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/31

Draft manuscript poem entitled "Hohenlinden", signed by T. Campbell, esquire

32 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/32

Manuscript poem, entitled "Hope's Garland", published in the Morning Herald , 16 May 1804

36 lines, with introductory paragaraph of its being addressed to Francis Annesly, esq., by Thomas Hope

[1804]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/33

Draft manuscript poem, first line "When a friend is torn from us in Life's early bloom", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

16 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/34

Manuscript poem, first line "You've oft asked me to sing, for you knew that I could not", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

20 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/35

Draft manuscript verses, entitled "Translation of a French song by Ignoramus Bibo", in the hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

26 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/36

Draft manuscript poem, entitled "The Water Party"

51 lines. Paper watermarked 1805.

[c1805]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/37

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Poets have sung, in many a tuneful line", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

70 lines, 9 other lines crossed out

Mar 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/38

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Descend ye bright Roman [?] divine", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

72 lines. Paper watermarked 1810.

[c1810]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/39

Manuscript poem addressed to Miss Porden, the author of the Veils on her birthday

41 lines. Signed "E.A."

14 Jul 1817

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/40

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Ere learning sacred light expanded", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

57 lines. Paper watermarked 1812.

[c1812]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/41

Draft manuscript of poem entitled "The Skull and the Custom House Officer", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/42

Draft first page of the "The History of the Garter", dedicated to Mr J.B. of York, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

34 lines [?dedicated to John Linnell Bond]

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/43

Draft part, headed 3rd part, of "The History of the Garter", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

50 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/44

Draft part of "The History of the Garter", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

30 lines, plus 4 crossed out, end of part 3

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/45

Draft part, headed "Part the fourth part", of "The History of the Garter", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

77 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/46

Draft part of manuscript of poem, including note of request to the Editress for the lines to be inserted into "The Garters" sent to York, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

42 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/47

Draft lines for part of poem in pastoral vein, first line "But mark you, youth, his steady pace", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

44 lines (numbered 29-72). Including references to Colin and Adelina

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/48

Draft lines for part of poem in pastoral vein, first line "And see in yonder verdant glad", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

38 lines (numbered 69-77, 1-29)

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/49

Draft lines for part of poem in pastoral vein, first line "The binds, for whom around the door", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

41 lines, plus 2 crossed out. Including references to Colin

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/51

Draft manuscript of part of poem, first line "More gracefull than the swans that glide"

35 lines, numbered 69 at end

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/52

Draft manuscript poem, entitled "The Philosopher at the Fair", in the hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

78 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/53

Draft part of manuscript poem, possibly meant for "The Philosopher and the Fair", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

105 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/54

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Awake , my bosom's dormant fire", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

52 lines

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/55

Draft lines for manuscript poem, first line "There flows, in Tiber's stream imbued"

14 lines, with 3 other lines on reverse

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/56

Draft manuscript poem, first line "Embossed in a close sequestered vale"

Lines numbered up to 262, several insertions. Two pages watermarked 1805.

[c1805]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/57

Draft manuscript of play entitled "The Lunatics", a comedy in three acts, "as written and performed at Positive House by the pupils of the Institution", in hand of Eleanor Porden

17 sheets. Involving Mr Beauclerc, Sir Pertinax Townly, Mr Srciblerus, Miss Stormont, Mrs Bustleton, and Lady Olivia Gossamer playing characters with names sounding like Greek mythological figures (respectively Misander, Cynthio, Alopex, Astartius (in male attire), Aspasia, Astartius abd Cyllene

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/58

Note of manuscript synopsis of plot of play in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden, addressed to Anna Vardill, involving the characters, Sir Pertinax, Lady Olivia, Lord A., Electro Magus, Michael Mitre, Kitty Maltravers, Mrs Bustleton, Rodelinda, Beauclerc and Atticus Scriblerus.

Top left hand corner of letter lost along folds.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/59

Part of draft manuscript synopsis of play, including Acts 1 and 2, involving characters Bamfield, Sir George Conyers, Freeman, Maria, Turner, Mr Yarraway, his wife Margery, their daughters Lucy and Maria Yarraway, the Parson and his daughter Fanny, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/60

Part of draft manuscript synopsis of play, including alternatives for Acts 1 and 2, involving characters Roger Yarraway, Margery Yarraway, their daughters Maria, Lucy, Mr Bamfield, Freeman and Conyers, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/61

Part of draft manuscript synopsis of play, including Act 3, involving characters named Freeman, Raymond, Miss Bamfield, Bamfield, Conyers, Roger and Margery Yarraway, Maria, Turner and Lucy, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/62

Part of draft manuscript synopsis of play, including Act 4, involving characters named the Parson's Daughter, Freeman, Bamfield, Miss B., Raymond, Mr and Mrs Yarraway, the Parson, Maria and Turner, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/63

Draft manuscript page from Act 1 of play, for scene in wood, involving characters named Conyers, Bamfield and Freeman, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/64

Draft manuscript page from Act 1 of play, for scenes involving characters named Conyers, Bamfield, Freeman, Maria and Turner, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/65

Draft manuscript page from play, for scenes involving characters named Conyers, Bamfield, Freeman, Maria and Turner, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/66

Draft manuscript page from play, for Scene 1, involving characters named Bamfield and Freeman, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/67

Draft manuscript pages from Act 1 of play, for scene at Mr Yarroway's house, involving characters named Mr and Mrs Yarraway, with Maria entering at end, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/68

Draft manuscript page from play, for scene involving characters named Mr Roger Yarraway, Mrs Margery Yarraway, Conyers, Bamfield and Freeman, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/69

Draft manuscript page from play, for scene involving characters named Roger and Margery [Yarraway], in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/70

Draft manuscript page from play, for scene involving characters named Maria and Mr Yarraway, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/71

Draft manuscript page from play, for scene set in a wood with moonlight, involving characters named Lucy and Maria, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/72

Draft manuscript page from play, for scene involving characters named Miss Bamfield, Maria and Raymond, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/73

Draft manuscript pages from play, including for Act 1, involving characters named Mr and Mrs Testy, Miss Maria Testy, Mr Layland, Sir Gregory and Miss Crape (order very confused), in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/74

Pages of draft synopsis of play, including for Acts 1 and 2, involving characters named Roger, Margery, Lucy, Mr Bamfield, Mr Conyers, Sir Gregory Grizzle, Miss Crape, Roger, Margery, the Parson, a clerk and Miss Blank, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/75

Page of draft prose, including on a dialogue between a gentleman and a barber and a gentleman of the army in Stratford upon Avon wanting to find out what people there knew of Shakespeare, in hand of William Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/76

Manuscript prose entitled "Spectatorial minutes", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Humorous observations on classifying news from Yorkshire as "foreign news", headstones in churchyards, and "Granny Greg" and pocket watches

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/77

Short piece manuscript prose on Hercules and Pegasus, described as a fable from the Greek, provided by Mr Flaxman

With design in pencil of memorial-type tablet on reverse

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/78

Manuscript prose work entitled "L'Acerbo - No. 1", claimed to be a copy of a work by a sorcerer burned to death in Florence in 1327, signed Philemon, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Electromagus, Positive House and the Attic Society.

[c1815]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/79

Manuscript prose work entitled "L'Acerbo - No. 2", in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Positive House, Second sheet dated 16 Sep 1815.

16 Sep 1815

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/80

Manuscript prose essay entitled "There is nothing new under the Sun"

On the links between ancient and modern discoveries.

1814

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/81

Draft account of the "travelling trio", Miss Eleanor Anne Porden and Mrs Porden, during a trip in the Home Counties

The trio are respectively described as the Keeper and Correspondent to the Tea Chest, Correspondent to the T.C. and Server of the T.C., travelling first on the Oxford Road, calling at the chapel of the Duke of Chandos at Canons Watford, Aylesbury, Oving, Stowe, Stony Stratford, Woburn Abbey, Saint Albans. Signed at end by Charles Kee, but signature crossed out.

16 Sep 1805

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/82

Draft letter from Joseph Wishwell to Mr Spectator, followed by notes to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Relating to the Tea Chest.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/83

Letter from "Planetarius" to "Mr Spectator", on going to the theatre to see and hear Adam Walker demonstrate his Orrery [a mechanical model of the solar system]

Starting with copies of verses by Homer (from the Iliad, Book 8, line 555) and Pope (12 lines about the Moon)

21 May 1806

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/84

Manuscript poem entitled "Answer to an Advertisement", by Atticus Scriblerus, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

63 lines. Paper watermarked 1816.

[c1816]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/85

Note from Atticus Scriblerus Junior on poem on electricity, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Electromagus and the Voltaic battery.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/86

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor of the Attic Chest at Positive House, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Paper watermarked 1807.

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/87

Letter addressed by Pertinax Townly from Positive House, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Electromagus, laboratory hermetically closed, Olivia, Rodelinda, Philemon, Atticus, Dr Beauclerc, and comparisons with figures of antiquity. Date originally 18 Feb in ink, then 6 March added in pencil. Paper watermarked 1808.

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/88

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Positive House, Lady Olivia, Electromagus, Sir William Fordyce, Dr Solander, Philemon, Mrs Bustleton, Rodelinda and Lord Aircastle. 67 lines. Paper watermarked 1808.

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/89

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to his courtship of a young lady, Lavinia, Positive House, Electromagus. Paper watermarked 1812.

[c1812]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/90

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to his Erminia, Lord and Lady Aircastle's intention to spend a few years in France, the sale of their house and its contents, including antique objects.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/91

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Addressed to Miss Vardill. Including references to acitivity in Positive House, Philemon, Atticus, Mrs Bustleton, Rodelinda, Electromagus, Incognita, Lady Olivia. Paper watermarked 1812.

[c1812]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/92

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Lord Aircastle, Electromagus, and Lady Olivia.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/93

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to the prospect of matrimony, Erminia, Electromagus,

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/94

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Electromagus, the Attic Society and to poem about battle of Waterloo. Name not signed, but seems to be in style of character Pertinax Townly. At end, in pencil, "Can you help me here".

[c1815]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/95

Letter from Pertinax Townly to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including reference to Electromagus and experiments with electricity. Name not signed, but seems to be in style of character Pertinax Townly.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/96

Letter from Electromagus to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Mr Peregrine Project, M. Berselius and Lord Aircastle. Paper watermarked 1812.

[c1812]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/97

Letter from Electromagus to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to Dr Beauclerc and the nature of electricity and heat. One sheet watermarked 1813.

[c1813]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/98

Letter from Electromagus to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to the nature of electricity, light and heat, the Voltaic battery and the incidents of muscle spasms. One sheet watermarked 1812.

[c1812]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/99

Letter from Electromagus to the Editor, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

Including references to the nature of electricity, light and heat, and future discussions of the Attic Society.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/100

Note to Eleanor Anne Porden from "Moth", responding to her request as "Stella" not to say he loved her

Asking her as Stella whether she thinks him "a complimentary correspondent"; she finds fault with him for saying he loves her, so he will not offend again, but he would not say it if were not true; he does not like pofessions anymore than she does; his love is greatest when she is ill, absent or unhappy; she thanks for remembering him on the 6th; wishing her many happy years. Thanks for her father's kind wishes. He expects her every day, being sure she will call when she goes to her sister's cottage. He had a note from Mrs P. for Mrs F.; he tells her offer as being"le bas bleu above the...

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/42/101

Ink drawing of antique-style ornament, with plinth, round bottomed body and thin neck with curlicue handles

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/43

Collection of writings gathered together in folded sheet entitled "Attic Chest - National Tales - Positive House - etc"

Seemingly draft items, including letters from Electromagus (three dated Dec 1813, 5 Mar 1814 and 19 Mar 1814), Pertinax Townly and Erminia, introduction to issue No. 3, 24 Jan 1809

[1809-1814]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44

Documents relating to or formerly held in the Attic Chest

With copy of stone's inscription, in abbreviated Latin followed by expansion into full Latin, for Claudia Martina [relating to a real archaeological find in 1806]

[c1808-1870s]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/1

Manuscript note, "Relic of Antiquity", describing hexagonal stone dug up near Ludgate Hill, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

With copy of stone's inscription, in abbreviated Latin followed by expansion into full Latin, for Claudia Martina [relating to a real archaeological find in 1806]

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/2

Copy of manuscript poem entitled "Lodgings for Single Gentlemen" by George Colman, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

44 lines. Paer watremarked 1808. [George Colman the Younger (1762-1836) was a playwright and theatre manager, who wrote a collection entitled "My Nightgown and Slippers, or, Tales in Verse", first published in 1797, which contained this poem]

[c1808]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/3

Manuscript memorandum on sight of rainbow during violent thunderstorm on the evening of 24 Jul 1809, in hand of Eleanor Anne Porden

 

25 Jul 1809

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/4

Account by Eleanor Anne Porden of evening spent spent at Mr Flaxman's on 23 Oct 1812, with discussion and conversation about ghosts, spirits and other supernatural beings

In the company of Mr, Mrs and Miss Flaxman, 2 Miss Denmans, Mr T. Denman, Mrs and Miss Vardill, Governor Franklin, and her mother. Conversation started after supper on the subject of Dr Johnson and his "propensity to Superstition". 2 sheets.

24 Oct 1812

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/5

Manuscript verses entitled "Address from the Spirit of the Attic Chest on its opening" by Eleanor Anne Porden

Found with manuscript of "The Veils"

[c1815]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/6

Note from Isaac D'Israeli on reading Mr Stanley's verses

Written at "K.R." [King's Road, Bedford Row], Tuesday 13 June. Paper watermarked 1811

13 Jun [1815]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/7

Letter from Mr Brande to Mr Stanley giving his verdict on verses

Ppaer watermarked 1817. At top of the paper is written "Attic Chest" in pencil.

[c1817]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/8

Newspaper cutting "The Late Arctic Expedition"

Including on Captain John Ross meeting 'Esquimaux'; Extract from letter from officer on "The Alexander", Lerwick, 3rd November 1818; on reverese notices for events dated 17 and 19 Nov 1818

Nov 1818

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/9

Part of extract from letter by Eleanor Anne Porden, on request by female [Mary Anne Flaxman] for the Attic Chest box to be lent out occasionally

An unnamed female had sent to reclaim the box at late notice; Miss Vardill had asked the editor and editress if they had any objection to lending it occasionally to her or Mrs Flaxman for a night, to which she answered that they had no objection; Eleanor is as much in the dark as any casual visitors that evening as to what "the intention of the Lottery" was and whether the letter's recipient had any share of it.

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/5/44/10

Part of letter from Henrietta Emillia Alice Kaye to Philip Lyttelton Gell, to whom she is giving the papers of the Attic Chest, with later envelope used by Aileen Pauline Gell to identify and explain the context

Letter has initial part of the letter cut away: Miss Kaye is sending the Attic Chest, with the key to it; she regards the papers as being only of interest as relics, and although they are clever, they would only be considered as curiosities by literary people today, more than 60 years later; the box includes copies of some of her aunt's poems and a copy of a botannical work in sheets; her own future descendants will have no interest in them; includes other references are to a bazaar in unknown cause, towards which Miss Kaye gave £1 to Alice [sister of the letter's recipient], health of an...

[1870s]

D8760/F/FEP/5/45

Uncut or loose pages of Elements of Botany by R.J. Thornton, M.D.

Comprising dedication pages (v-viii) and first 12 pages of Volume I , pages 1-75 of Volume I: Part II, Terms of the Science, and illustrative plates of engravings of flowers and other flora.

These pages were specifically stated as belonging with the papers of the Attic Chest in the letter of transfer (D8760/F/FEP/5/44/10).

1810-1812

D8760/F/FEP/6

Travel diaries and commonplace books of Eleanor Anne Porden

Eleanor Anne Porden, in the company of her father, visited the Continent three times after it was opened up for travellers from England following the deffeat of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815.

1815-1823

D8760/F/FEP/6/1

Commonplace book of Eleanor Anne Porden

Extract from "Voyages dans les Alpes", Tomes VI, VIII, by Horace-Benedict de Saussure , describing places in the Alps, mostly in French, 20 pages; extracts from "Sur la literature du Midi de l'Europe" by Jean Charles Leonard de Simonde de Sismondi, on the Northern lights and Cecco d'Ascoli, in French, c.1 page; extract from Mathilde by Sophie Cottin, in French, c.2 pages; 2 sets of verses in English, 1 page; poem on surnames from the New Monthly Magazine for July 1823, 3 pages; poem entitled "The burial of Sir John Moore who fell at the Bttle of Corunna, in Spain, in 1809" by Charles Wolfe...

1815-1823

D8760/F/FEP/6/2

Commonplace book of Eleanor Anne Porden

Comprising extracts, with some notes, from Johnstone's travels in Russia, etc, on West Prussia, Moscow; Cambrian Popular Antiquities by Peter Roberts; Account of Switzerland by A. Yosy; The Sacred Edict of China, comprising 16 maxims by the Emperor Kangxi; Expeditions to the North Pole, from the Philosophical Magazine, Apr 1818; Remarks on the Kraken, from Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, March 1818.

Identified on the inside as William Porden's, but handwriting is that of Eleanor Porden

1818

D8760/F/FEP/6/3

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey in France

Tuesday July 30th 1816

They left London at 9 am in Mr Crosweller’s Blue coach from the New White Horse Cellar, and after going round by Blackfriars Road to have a pair of new hind wheels, fairly launched their journey. They were amused by a lady called Tregent who had returned from Paris but a few days. She advised them with recommendations of honest Parisian tradesmen. She directed them to a Monsieur Bartholomien of the Palais Royal, who she assured them would take care that nobody cheated us ‘’but himself, we presume’’( EP). They arrived at Brighton at 5 o’clock and found her sister...

30 Jul 1816-3 Sep 1816

D8760/F/FEP/6/4

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey in France

Continuation of September 3rd 1816

Describes the Catacombs. On leaving they went to the church of the Val de Grace, then the Hopital des Enfants Trouve close by, much amused by the ‘’sight of so many lines, of neat clean cradles’’. They then went to the larger establishment in the Grande Rue de Faubourg St Antoine , where they saw the children employed. Lastly they visited the Church of St Pane and St Louis, close to the College Royale de Charlemagne.

Wednesday September 4th

Received a visit from the Elliotts then went to see the king at Mass but were too late. They dined with Miss...

3 Sep 1816-11 Oct 1816

D8760/F/FEP/6/5

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey in France

Inside front cover – Bookplate with the name Philip Lyttelton Gell.

Front of journal: handwritten in pencil " No. 3 in continuation of this journey 1816 Eleanor Anne Porden "

October 11th

Continued description of the journey with ‘’towns half deserted and falling to decay.’’ Mentions a church they passed before Amiens which had gravestones ‘’almost all of black and white’’.

They reached Amiens about 2 o’clock. They went to look for a hotel near the cathedral but were unsuccessful so they stayed at the Hotel de France with clean and comfortable apartments.

EP describes the chivalrous...

11 Oct 1816-25 Nov 1816

D8760/F/FEP/6/6

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, in France, including Paris

Dried flowers inserted in several places

6 Aug 1818-12 Sep 1818

D8760/F/FEP/6/7

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey to the Alps

Dried flowers inserted in several places

12 Sep 1818-2 Oct 1818

D8760/F/FEP/6/8

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey to the Alps

 

3-29 Oct 1818

D8760/F/FEP/6/9

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey to the Alps and return to England

 

29 Oct 1818-20 Nov 1818

D8760/F/FEP/6/10

Travel diary of Eleanor Anne Porden, on journey to France

With inserted loose pages for the period 22 Oct - 1 Nov 1821, loose account and dried flowers

7 Sep 1821-3 Nov 1821

D8760/F/FEP/7

Personal papers of Eleanor Anne Porden

 

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/7/1

Satirical notes of "Travelling Hints" for Eleanor Anne Porden in unidentified hand [?one of the Attic Chest members]

 

23 Jul 1820

D8760/F/FEP/7/2

Receipted bill of Mrs Franklin for earthernware purchased from Lambert's, London

Purchased from Lambert's at 13 Castle Street off Berners Lane between 17 Aug and 20 Nov 1823, to the value of £1 3s ½d

Nov 1823

D8760/F/FEP/7/3

List written by Eleanor Anne Franklin of books in the first bookcase in the "Little Room"

Arranged by 6 shelves and middle large division, including many books in French. Written on paper used for address of William Porden, Berners Street

[early 19th cent]

D8760/F/FEP/7/4

Poem with first line "You lovely solitary rose", copied from Miss Spence's "Letters from the North Highlands" [published in 1817]

Written on small piece of paper (15 x 10 cm) in the handwriting of Eleanor Anne Porden

[c1820]

D8760/F/FEP/7/5

Report of the examination of the body of Mrs Eleanor Franklin by Doctor G.J. Guthrie

 

24 Feb 1825

D8760/F/FEP/7/6

Manuscript copy of extracts from "The Times" of 24-25 Feb 1825, on the death of Eleanor Anne Porden

Obituary of Mrs Eleanor Franklin, extracted from page 2 column 5, 25 Feb 1825; letter to the Editor, extracted from page 4 column 3, informing him that her death was not caused by the painful separation from her husband, as she was thought to be at the point of death some days before his departure as a result of a long standing disorder, also adding that Franklin had lost within a short period his brother Sir Willingham Franklin, his father, a brother-in-law, two children of Sir Willingham and Lady Franklin, and Lady Franklin's mother, signed "A.M.", 24 Feb 1825.

[20th cent]

D8760/F/FJR

Records of John Richardson, colleague, friend and later relative of John Franklin

The records consist of 89 letters written by John Franklin to Richardson between 1820 and 1845, together with 2 letters written by Franklin to his niece, and Richardsons's wife, Mary, 1833-1834, 5 letters from other correspondents, 1825-1850, assorted extracts or copies of documents relating to Arctic exploration, and examples of his published writings, including "The Polar Expedition" of 1861.

1820-1861

D8760/F/FJR/1

Letters of John Richardson, colleague, friend and later relative of John Franklin

 

1820-1850

D8760/F/FJR/1/1

Letters largely by John Franklin to John Richardson, formerly in a bound volume

Includes two letters by Franklin to niece Mary Richardson

1820-1845

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/1

Letter from John Franklin to his colleague John Richardson, during the first Arctic land expedition

Has arrived: describes stiffness and pain suffered on a fourteen day journey. Neglectful provision made by Holmes: socks with prominent seams; capes useless when wet with perspiration and dogs unsuitable and provided with inadequate food. Difficult to take bearings and accurate temperature readings. Describes Saskatchewan river and lists varieties of trees on river banks. Intends to visit Indian encampment and buffalo pound. Now supplied with better dogs. Asks for stones to be forwarded: may be valuable for the British Museum.

3 Feb 1820

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/2

Letter from John Franklin to his colleague John Richardson, during the first Arctic land expedition

Has completed journey: walked all the way on snow shoes. Dined with Mr Cameron. Discusses arrangements for pemmican supply. Will leave tomorrow. Invited to quarter at Bethune’s house but may learn more of the northern departments by staying with Clarke

19 Feb 1820

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/3

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, relating to reaction to the first Arctic land expedition

Colonial Office and Admiralty entirely satisfied with “our proceedings”; they endorse action taken in respect of Michel. Brown appreciative of collected items: his house in Soho Square now houses museum of Linnean Society: Richardson invited to become a member; and similar invitation expected from The Royal Society. Reports enthusiasm of Cooke and Murray for publication of journals. Gives news of Parry, Hepburn and Back. Recommends London hotels.

24 Oct 1822

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/4

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, just after his return to England from the first Arctic land expedition

Will join Richardson in a few days. Found father blind and infirm and eldest sister an invalid. Discusses publication of journals. Invited to visit Lord Bathurst. Pleased that Richardson met Mr Burnside

31 Oct 1822

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/5

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, staying in Nottingham, including on the death of Mr Elliot and his own visit to Matlock

Elliot had been looking forward to entertaining us both, but has died suddenly of gangrene: his sister, Mrs Burnside distressed: she had earlier experienced the death of “my brother’s children”. Visited Matlock yesterday: delighted with the scenery, as picturesque as anywhere he has been, if not as grand as what they have seen in America; had letter from Back, thanking him for his suggestions for proceeding in America; Back is going to propose expedition down the Mackenzie River. First edition mentioned in Gentlemen’s Magazine

13 Jun 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/6

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, staying in Nottingham, including on the funeral of Mr Elliot

Describes funeral [of Elliot]. Misses the meditation and reflection experienced at Fort Enterprise. Commends Mrs Burnside’s care of his niece. Refers to honour bestowed “on us by your kind magistrates”. The book has been ordered by all Nottingham societies and the public library. About to meet sister and the little Sellwoods in London

19 Jul 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/7

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on the possibility of a second Arctic land expedition

Unexpected arrival from India of brother James, his wife and wife’s sister. Discusses publication of Appendix and allocation of natural history specimens to Edinburgh and British Museums. Asks about reviews of book in Edinburgh publications. Government decision not to equip any expedition before Parry’s return: Barrow and Hudson want to explore Mackenzie River

24 Jul 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/8

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on the possibility of second Arctic land expedition and the Admiralty's response to the killing of Michel Terahoute during the first Arctic land expedition

Discussions with Barrow: doubt whether reports about Parry arriving at Valparaiso are true. Barrow favourable to a new expedition but no Government backing until Parry’s return. Barrow suggesting alterations to text for octavo edition to clarify that Michel murdered Hood and that killing of Michel was necessary. Franklin’s landlady found that her title to the house was defective

1 Aug 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/9

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on publication of edition of the narrative of the first Arctic land expedition

Has visited many friends who send good wishes. Reports death of Dr John Fawcett of Horncastle and names possible successors. His wife is pleased with Richardson's observations on differences between Greek and Roman architecture. Received letter of thanks from Jameson for specimens. Second edition now finished: Murray to decide when best to publish. Hopes Lord Melville will give Richardson an appointment. Expecting to hear how “our narrative” has been received by those at Hudson’s Bay. Gives news of Back

18 Oct 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/10

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on discussions for second Arctic land expedition

Reports that Parry was very pleased with newspaper article sent by Richardson. Has told Barrow that Richardson would like an appointment at a foreign hospital. Reports Lord Melville’s regret at Richardson not having been offered a post. Offers advice about steps Richardson might take to promote his claim. Has talked to Barrow about an exploration of the coast and Mackenzie River: to discuss with officers of Hudson Bay Company and then prepare a submission. Parry to go again to Regents Inlet: if not Parry then Franklin himself would have been the commander. Back has sailed for the West...

17 Nov 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/11

Letter from John Franklin to friend John Richardson, including on proposals for a second Arctic land expedition

Asks Richardson about describing zoological specimens from “the late voyage”: no longer acceptable to Sabine and Parry for Sabine to do this. Natural History and Astronomical Observations to appear later in an appendix - so time available and Fisher’s contribution likely to be some time. Jameson and Hooker writing description of mineralogy and botany for Parry. Parry and Brown have explained delay to Appendix. Will speak to Brown about the book mentioned by Richardson. Reports discussions within Hudson’s Bay Co. about a proposed Mackenzie River expedition: a year’s notice needed for...

20 Nov [1823]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/12

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, enclosing letter to John Barrow proposing another Arctic expedition

Pleased that Richardson has undertaken a description of Parry’s geology: will enhance Richardson’s reputation. Parry just appointed Hydrographer to the Admiralty and will be in command of the next expedition. Lord Melville yet to decide the next voyage. Some from earlier expedition not willing to go: Mr Edwards, Surgeon has applied for staff appointment. Encloses copy of proposed expedition. [Hudson’s Bay] Company directors favourable: concerned about Russian encroachment. Discusses contingent planning for supply and distribution of stores. Had letter from McVicar: Indians paid all our...

28 Nov 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/12/a

Copy of letter from John Franklin to John Barrow of the Admiralty, enclosed with letter to John Richardson, proposing another Arctic expedition

Proposes an expedition overland to the mouth of the Mackenzie River then along the shore to the north western extremity of America. Anticipates that the proposal may attract reservations given the suffering involved in the earlier expedition, but counters with detailed proposals for adequate supply depots; better liaison with the local Indian population and the use of boats and canoes to be purpose-built in England. No longer any disadvantage from the rivalry between North West Company and Hudson’s Bay Company. Proposes 2 officers and 12 British seamen to leave England in February 1825...

26 Nov 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/13

Letter from John Franklin to John Richardson, on plans for next Arctic land expedition

Lord Bathurst regards plan as practicable. Has made enquires at Greenwich: but no news of a possible vacancy for Richardson. Perhaps Richardson has not realised that green and red, his proposed colours for the men’s clothing are those of Russian uniforms and could generate confusion: suggests blue and silver. Pleased at Richardson’s approval of McVicar taking charge and proposes to take McVicar to the Royal Society. Reports news received from Mr West, Red River: payment of dole; delight at reception from Ekimos at Churchill; news of Augustus. Harding has learned Eskimo language and acts as...

15 Dec 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/14

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, largely on preparations for second Arctic land expedition, including on not wanting George Back to go on it

Captain Parry sending Richardson a parcel: would like a closer acquaintance. Awaiting copies of second edition of Canadian Airs and copies of Franklin’s portrait. Murray absent or busy so unable to settle Richardson’s bill: gives amount of tailor’s bill. Asks for Hepburn’s sketch so that Franklin’s volume can be bound. Thanks Richardson for list of stores and instruments. Discusses boats needed: undecided between Portsmouth wherry, Deal gig or London wherry: asks Richardson to consult with Hepburn. Gives details of proposals to be made to Barrow and Bathurst for Richardson’s part of the...

20 Dec [1823]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/15

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for the second Arctic land expedition

Expresses sympathy for Richardson’s recent bereavement. Hudson’s Bay Company have reached an agreement with East India Company about marketing of furs. Reports reactions to proposed expedition and discusses plans. Refers to Government concern about Russian encroachment. Parry agrees with Franklin’s recommendation that Richardson should join the expedition. Back not to join: now promoted in The West Indies. Lt Bushnan recommended by Parry and will take lessons in sketching. Garry agreeable to McVicar being sent to take charge of canoes. Sets out dimensions and load capacity of possible boats...

30 Dec 1823

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/16

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for the second Arctic land expedition

Gives reassurance from conversations with Lord Melville that Richardson will be found an interim vacancy and proposed natural history survey will be supported. Had discussion with Barrow about expedition instructions for the eventuality of an accident to Franklin: Bushnan to be made aware. Discusses intentions for publications about forthcoming expedition. All think it important to give Hudson’s Bay Company a year’s notice of the expedition. Discusses arrangements for boats and canoes. Has had communication with Hepburn and will have Hepburn’s portrait framed. Asks Richardson to have a...

14 Jan 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/17

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on portraits of Franklin and preparations for the second Arctic land expedition

Sends Richardson book and portrait (of Franklin) by Lewis. Lewis’s portrait not generally liked and a further portrait to be done by “one of the best portrait painters in town” (not named). Richardson might wait for this before getting book bound. Gives financial details relating to publication of second edition: paid less than Parry was paid for his first edition. Will prepare lists of stores and clothing. Happy to take on a taxidermist recommended by Richardson. Reports positive opinions of Beaufort, Heywood and others. Barrow wants Richardson to survey between Mackenzie and Copper Mine...

10 Feb 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/18

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on possible employment opportunity for his friend

Reports news/rumours of retirement of Vance and death of a physician at Plymouth, both Navy physicians. Has asked Barrow about possibility of a consequent vacancy for Richardson. Going with Parry to see Gifford

21 Feb 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/19

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for the second Arctic land expedition

Discusses and seeks Richardson’s opinion about expedition clothing: material proposed by Mr Macintosh. About to see about selection of guns. Has learned that people at Mackenzie river are invited to establish a new post lower than Fort Good Hope. Discusses appointment to posts [in Hudson’s Bay Company]; refers to Garry, Pelley, Dease, Roderick McLeod. Has seen a letter to Thompson which tells of widespread European interest and of commercial interest in anticipating Russians in surveying northern coast. Reports good progress with the boats

23 Feb 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/20

Letter (first page only) from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on possible employment opportunity for his friend at Chatham

Describes positive trial of boat: crossed river at Woolwich. Heard that Richardson may have been appointed to a post at Chatham: sought confirmation but could not see Barrow as he had just lost a child. Adds that Chatham appointment likely but not confirmed as Vance has not yet retired

16 Mar 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/21

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, following the death of his father Willingham Franklin

He is to leave town that evening, following death of his father on Satruday after only 3 days illness; expresses his own distress and pious resignation of his sisters. Gives news of Vance. Hopes to meet in London before Richardson takes up appointment: wants a discussion before stores are embarked and expedition clothes are made. Remarks on the coincidence that they left Point Turnagain on the day, 22 August, that Parry sailed out of Repulse Bay, 539 miles distant. Refers to a manuscript by a friend of Richardson’s.

6 Apr 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/22

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including references to his wife's health and preparations for another Arctic expedition

Invites Richardson to stay and to go to Parry’s ball on board Hecla on 4 May. His wifes is much better and would not be fatigued by his visit. Discusses application to Mr Horton for six men to leave in May by a Hudson’s Bay Company ship. PS. Wants Hepburn to write and he is about to employ Neil McDonald.

24 Apr 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/23

Letter from John Franklin to friend John Richardson, on provisioning of second Arctic land expedition

Checking packages for embarcation by the 27th except for the boats going on on 4 June. Asks Richardson’s immediate opinion about sending two 8-gallon kegs of rum left over from Parry’s last voyage. Concerned at risk of men “poaching” it: suggests marking it as “powder”

21 May 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/23a

List of provisions for expedition, in handwriting of John Richardson

Detailed equipment list, including blankets, clothing, gun articles, food, crockery, paper; presumably for their second Arctic land expedition (1825-1827)

[May 1824]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/24

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, relating to the use of the late Robert Hood's drawings in publications, preparations for the Arctic expedition and family news

Has seen Barrow; who advised against more of Hood’s engravings being included in a new quarto edition: but suggested that subject to his father’s wishes, more of Hood’s work should be included in the book to be written after the forthcoming expedition. To see Murray and Finden about drawings of Cape Barrow and other locations. Has reported to Lord Melville the departure of stores. Lyon leaves tomorrow: has stores for Cape Chudleigh. Reports progress of Mrs Franklin and the baby. Has received copy of third edition for Richardson. Bushnan about to be married. Delivered Richardson’s memorandum...

9 Jun 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/25

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for expedition

Awaits Richardson’s suggestions for stores to be sent to Lake Huron. Asks Richardson’s opinion about crews for paddling canoes. Baby, "Little Missey", improving daily: taken into Regent’s Park yesterday. Bushnan about to be married. Letter from McVicar: progress of his journey: weight of load required a further canoe to be obtained from Montreal. Letter dated 28 June only; 1824 was added in pencil, which conforms with context and reference to baby.

28 Jun 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/26

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on wife's health and provisions for expedition

Intends to visit Chatham: medical advice that Mrs Franklin should spend a few days outside London. Intends to stay at Greenwich then steam boat to Gravesend and a post-chaise to Chatham. Received wedding cake from Bushnan. Delayed receipt of a letter from Back. List of stores for Canada needs revision. Letter only dated Saturday, but postmarked 3 July 1824.

3 Jul 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/27

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on the death of his brother-in-law, Mr Cracroft

Describes illness and death of brother Mr Cracroft [brother-in-law, Thomas Robert Cracroft]. Fears impact on sister Bella. Needs to postpone Chatham visit. Asks for return of portmanteau of clothes once they are back from washerwoman. Baby doing well. Has asked Mr Glynne for news of publication of Richardson’s friend’s manuscript. Baillie still to approve list of stores. Postscript 14 July on there being no letter from Lincolnshire. Dated only dated 13 July; year 1824 aded in pencil, but this tallies with the death of Mr Cracroft.

13 Jul 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/28

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on the death of his brother-in-law, Mr Cracroft

Describes sister’s reaction to her husband’s death and relates progress of his illness. Refers to Christian faith. Asks Richardson to provide an endorsement of Dr Bonsfield’s reference for an [unnamed, possibly Charles] uncle of Mr Rawnsley, a clergyman of Spilsby: the uncle seeks to practise medicine in Aberdeen after returning from India having practised there as a physican for many years, and he wishes to get an M.D. from Aberdeen, for which he needs the signatures of two physicians who had graduated there; as Dr Bonsfield had not graduated there, it was thought that a testimonial from a...

19 Jul 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/29

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, with additional text by Eleanor Anne Franklin

Franklin describes accommodation and locality: music played three times daily. Describes Mrs Franklin’s state of health. Barrow is here: have discussed young Buchan as a replacement for Bushnan, and argued for Back to be promoted. Received a request from Captain Baker to join the expedition as a volunteer without pay.

Additional text by Eleanor Ann Franklin: writes of benefit of good air enjoyed at Chatham and Tunbridge Wells. Suggests potential activities for Richardson should he be at Tunbridge Wells. At present he would have to stay at an inn, but a room would be free at the cottage...

24 Aug 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/30

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on appointments to their next Arctic land expedition

Expresses regret at Richardson’s illness: perhaps a consequence of their activities [at Chatham]. With Barrow has seen a Lt Hood - not suitable. Having to wait for Back’s refusal is a convenient answer to all present applicants. Has asked Buchan about his son’s sketching ability. Richardson is to ask Baillie about payment of bills. Pleased that Richardson has found a suitable plant collector. Invites Richardson to Tunbridge Wells. Expects a visit from Mr & Mrs Kay. Suggests that Richardson had mis-read handwriting in previous letter: the reference was to filling spare room remaining on the...

2 Sep 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/31

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, asking him and his wife to stay with them, inlcuding on preparartions for their next Arctic land expedition

They now have room for Richardson and his wife to visit. Lists local attractions and gives information about local coach route. Baby getting fat and heavy. No news about a successor to Bushnan: Buchan as good as any but vacancy will be kept open for Back. Questions whether Back will be promoted. Has Richardson used the altitude instrument? Mrs Richardson welcome to visit if Richardson cannot. Reports death of Mrs Burnside at Nottingham.

26 Sep 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/32

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on death of his brother Willingham Franklin

Reports death of brother Willingham: a reminder from the Almighty of the need to be prepared for one’s own death. Concern for the widow being left in a foreign country about to learn of her mother’s death. News from Simpson, Lord Selkirk’s Colony, of good progress. Letter from Captain Lyon. No news about Bushnan’s successor. Printer making slow progress. Regrets that Richardson and his wife were unable to visit Tunbridge Wells. Garry has offered assistance. Hudson Bay Company are altering their house and intend to use a room for a North America Museum

13 Oct 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/33

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for their next Arctic land expedition

Several letters received from Hudson’s Bay. Wentzel sends specimens. All from Simpson down are zealous for our cause. Dease’s appointment confirmed. Mentions McDonald, James Keith and Smith; and gives details of distribution of provisions. Reports a massacre of Copper Indians by Dog Rib men: names some victims and expresses concern for Akaitcho. Reports progress and safeguarding of boats. Gives date for start of Richardson’s expedition pay. Thanks for condolences: widowed sister resigned but Mrs Booth recovering from cholera. Hudson’s Bay Company have moved their post on Mackenzie River to...

28 Oct 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/34

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on the preparations for their next Arctic land expedition, inlcuding references to Parry's intended concurrent expedition

Discusses Parry’s arrival: expects to learn more about Parry’s voyage when Parry is strong enough. Pleased to learn from newspaper accounts that Parry’s observations about Eskimos were congruent with ours. Feels vindicated in his decision to use boats/canoes to explore Mackenzie River. To see Barrow about promotion of officers. Cannot know what the Sabines and the Brownes will make of newspaper reports. Reports news of McAuley and Stewart. Apologises for scrawling letter; hurried by visiting; “the consequence of marriage.” Workmen in the house.

4 Nov 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/35

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for their next Arctic land expedition, including on the reluctant appointment of George Back

Back has accepted the offer made to him, which Franklin cannot say he is glad of it, and neither does Back given the tenor of his letter to Mr Barrow. Barrow believes Richardson should have a companion for his part of the journey. Kendall seen making charts in Lyon’s room: would not have invited Kendall to go if there was prospect of Lyon going out again: but Barrow predicts no such prospect, so will approach Kendall. Reports discussion with Barrow about including junction of coast with Point Turnagain in the expedition. Discusses number of officers and suggests need for someone to take...

24 Nov 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/36

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, in the months leading up to the setting off of their next Arctic land expedition

No news of Richardson’s successor. His leave to commence on 1 January. To spend a fortnight with family in Lincolnshire. Has seen Mrs Complin: she and her husband might visit Richardson in Chatham. Reports discussion with Horton and Baillie about Richardson’s wish to have Drummond in the party.

3 Dec 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/37

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on preparations for their next Arctic land expedition, inlcuding on the appointment of Edward Kendall

Back has arrived. Reports on visit to 47 Great Portland Street: first floor unoccupied but matter not settled as Mrs Pilkington away. Regrets that Hepburn’s vessel to be paid off. Will see Byam Martin and Baillie about arrangements in relation to four marines: asks Richardson for their names and for which to exclude if only three can be taken. Lords of the Admiralty believed to be unwilling for Richardson to explore along the coast without an officer. Will apply for Kendall. Beechey about to commission [HMS] Blossom.

Postscript dated 31 Dec 1824: Hallet has sent a copy of his work for...

30 Dec 1824

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/38

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, in Canada during the firts few months of the second Arctic land expedition

Grateful for Richardson’s work at Fort Norman. Lists stores: spirits and grease added to stockpile. Has ordered Smith to send powder and ball previously loaned to him. Commends Richardson’s choice of crew. Intends to go to Whale Island soon: describes intentions thereafter. Discusses arrangements for Richardson’s journey, which has been discussed with Back. Richardson free to take men of his choice. Hopes to meet Richardson by end of September. Reports news of discovery by Copper Indians of a river near end of Great Bear Lake. Reports dismissal of Canadians and related financial...

7 Aug 1825

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/39

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, shortly after return from the second Arctic land expedition, including on favourable reactions from the Admiralty

Reports conversations with Huskisson about map and drawings. Horton pleased at our success. Barrow advises not to apply for Parliamentary reward: the scheme is limited to boats entering from the Pacific. Barrow reading Franklin’s journal and about to read Richardson’s journal: all at Admiralty delighted with our achievement. Back’s brothers report that he has lost money with Cook’s failure. Back and Kendall will be subject to a new requirement that all navy officers must serve allotted time in a ship. Daughter still somewhat of an invalid: going to Horncastle: anxious to see her. Reports...

2 Oct 1827

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/40

Letter from John Franklin to friend John Richardson, including on publication of Franklin's narrative of the second Arctic land expedition

Discusses revision of “narrative” text, including deleting an opinion about a provision depot being unnecessary, to ensure that Barrow should not, in the future, use this to deny Parry or another explorer such a depot. Some text altered on advice from Beaufort. Forwards a card from Garry and a request for Richardson to spare some seeds for a lady. Asks Richardson about a title; sends copy of Murray’s advertisement to asssist in drawing it up; will refer outline to Beaufort and Tinney. Gives details of preparation for printing. Will ask Murray to publish the book by early June. Will get...

[1828]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/41

Letter from John Franklin to friend John Richardson, on potential employment opportunities in Australia

Distressed that Lord High Admiral has refused Richardson’s pay. Going to Portsmouth with Parry and hopes to see Richardson in London. He thinks his determination to have nothing more to do with expeditions wise, as he is almost of the same opinion. Reports long conversation with Col Dumaresque [Henry Dumaresq] about proposal for exploration in Australia inland from Morton Bay. Suggests Richardson might want to join such an expedition, while also mentioning salary details of a possible vacancy in Sydney following the resignation of the present Inspector of Civil Hospitals. McLeay said to be...

12 Apr 1828

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/42

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on on Franklin's possible employment opportunities

Forwards receipt from Landseer. Has sent proofs of plates to Frankland Lewis. Reports discussions with Sir George Cockburn, Byam Martin and Lord Bathurst about future employment; and with Byam Martin and commissioner Thomson about Hepburn’s future. Has sought opinions of Barrow, Beaufort and Parry about what he would be best to do.

28 Jun 1828

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/43

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on Franklin's possible marriage in St Petersburg

Marriage to take place in St Petersburg. Family going there and to Moscow this week. Franklin himself to go in August. After marriage will return via Berlin and Flanders. Has applied for six months leave and has applied to Mr Backhouse for letters of introduction. Going to Nottingham today. Tell Mary Ann I should have written to her had I had time. Reports positive response of Frankland Lewis to engravings: has a set from Landseer for Lord Goderich. Discusses aspects of publication. Has asked Hutchinson to select some medical books for Richardson’s new house

2 Jul 1828

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/44

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on postponement of Franklin's intended marriage in St Petersburg

Regrets missing Richardson in London: changed plan and returned through Holland instead of direct from Hamburg. Much to tell about an agreeable tour: hopes to visit Richardson at Chatham after visiting Brighton. Marriage likely in early November. Both pleased at decision to postpone the marriage given humiliations of Russia for English newly-weds. May see Beechey tomorrow. Met Mr Elston at Admiralty: account in Narrative is regarded as complete: did not strike him that Elston was particularly well informed. Empress Mother of Russia and Admiral Krusenstern enquired after Richardson. Saw...

18 Oct 1828

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/45

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on preparations for publication of anrrative of their second Arctic land expedition

Busy in London: will reach Chatham a day later than originally thought. Murray has given orders for colouring of the binds [for book to be published] and they are being done. Has engraving of Richardson’s portrait. Mrs Franklin looking forward to seeing Mrs Richardson: will bring slices of wedding cake. Miss Ferard and her brother wish to see the dockyard

15 Nov 1828

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/46

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while Franklin is abroad in Paris during his honeymoon

Reports invitations to soirees and dinners. Lists “leading men” met there: particularly mentions Cuvier. Invites Richardson to visit. Notes interest shown in observations of the effect of Aurora on compass needle. Gives opinion about a museum visit. Will give Hausman a letter of introduction to Richardson. Declined an offer of a special seat at the Institute: too prominent for a nervous man. Invited to dinner and offered assistance by the Duke of Orleans. Expects to be introduced to Madame La Dauphine: has written to say he was first hand on one of the ships on her return to France. Enjoyed...

11 Dec 1828

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/47

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on Franklin trying to gain formal recognition for himself and the second Arctic land expedition members

Reflects on his limited influence with the “New Direction” in relation to assisting Richardson’s nephew [not named] in getting appointed as a medical officer in India. In the last election he voted in the way promised by his wife. Took Richardson’s letter to Garry and reports Garry’s response. Will approach Mr Griffin: he and his daughters own stock and have votes. Ross going on his own account will stop any Government sponsored expedition. Even if Ross is successful the coast between Point Turnagain and Melville peninsula will remained unsurveyed. This was a good time to see Sir George...

31 Mar 1829

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/48

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on offers of employment from Australian Land Company

Has declined the offer by Australian Land Company of a post in New South Wales. Captain Parry has declined a similar offer. Asked whether Richardson might accept the post: invites Richardson’s response. Dr Hooker intends to visit Richardson. Relays a request from Professor Buckland for a specimen of saxifrage for Count Sternberg who has just published a monograph

6 Apr 1829

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/49

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on publication of text by Richardson and the lack of government interest in science

Commends Richardson’s text and conveys suggestions of Parry and Beaufort for detailed alterations. Alleges a Government lack of interest in science and reports comments of Chancellor of the Exchequer to Royal Society deputation that he knew little of science and cared less. Hopes to see Murray. Sympathises with Richardson’s sore throat. Refers to a presentation involving Lord Goderich. Parry going to the Australian Company. Forwards a note from Dr Fitton: geological notices for Captain Ross who is on the eve of sailing. Pleased that Beaufort has been appointed Hydrographer.

Letter dated...

18 May [1829]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/50

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on publication of book and sailing of expedition of John Ross that day

Reports discussion with Murray about details of publication, including price, number of copies and immediate copies for the King and Lord Goderich. Murray saw that the text was missing Parry’s title. Reports visit to Mrs Lyon: compliments her son’s daughter . Complaints at the meanness of the Brazilian Mining Company toward her son. Dined with Mr & Mrs Cheales, the Kays and Back. Mrs Franklin not able to accept an invitation to Chatham: about to go to Oxford and Nottingham. Heard from Davies Gilbert that Ross was to sail that day: aggrieved that Ross had not informed him as he had obtained...

19 May [1829]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/51

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on publication of books

Has sent Richardson’s list of required books to Murray. Reports discussions about publication: progress of copies for the King, Lord Goderich and the Duke of Orleans; and discussions with Murray about price. Expresses thanks for copies of Richardson’s book. Refers to a letter to the Geographical Society. Letter not dated, but postmarked 4 Jun 1829

4 Jun 1829

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/52

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on his travels in northern England, including reference to Franklin waiting for command of a Mediterranean ship

Acknowledges dislike of letter-writing. Describes visits in Yorkshire and Durham: lead mine, coal pit, loading of a ship at Sunderland with coal for London; capstan and windlass with an endless chain. Saw old acquaintances (? Gormley, Patten; and Phillips at Newcastle). Visited a friend at Wycliffe, Rokeby: scenery there surpassed by Upper Tees, Swaledale and Richmond. Stayed with Lord Tyrconnell at Kiplin Hall. Read Last of the Mohicans and other Cooper novels. Reports on wife’s health and treatment. Kendall has sent journal notes: hopes Kendall will be promoted: obliged to Kendall for his...

15 Dec 1829

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/53

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on the inadequacies as a publisher of John Murray, then facing libel action

Has asked Commissioner Thomson to consider Hepburn in case the rope walk at Woolwich is to be reduced: will make a personal request to Byam Martin. Will return to London in a fortnight: refers to wife’s health. Discusses correspondence in The Times about Royal Society president. Given this controversy advised by Beaufort to remain in Cheltenham. Regrets Murray’s inadequacies. Murray facing a libel action: hopes he will be fined, not imprisoned. Cannot find that Hooker has published any part of The Flora. Dr Coley, naval surgeon, wants to meet Richardson. Plenty of visiting in Cheltenham...

9 Feb 1830

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/54

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on trying to help Richardson's brother get appointed to the Van Diemen's Land Company

Copies text of letter from Mr Pearse to Garry after meeting of Van Diemen’s Land directors: appointment decision adjourned. Garry not able to attend meeting: his horse fell. Indicates support for Richardson’s brother’s application for appointment. Suggests arrangements for programme for forthcoming visit of Richardson and his wife.

19 Apr 1830

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/55

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on trying to help Richardson's brother get appointed to the Van Diemen's Land Company

Gives detailed news about attempts to support Richardson’s brother’s application for appointment [to Van Diemen’s Land Company] and about the Board‘s preference for another applicant. Kendall has been sent on a secret mission. Lord Melville anxious to give me a ship

11 Jun 1830

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/56

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on Richardson's suggestion to complete survey of the North American coast

Forwards a Treasury letter about money for Richardson. Second part of Dr Hooker’s Flora almost ready for publication. Suggests which books should be given to the King. Pleased that Richardson has asked Hay about completion of survey of northern coast of America: has taken advice from Barrow and Beaufort about the propriety of speaking to the King about this. believes the survey should be completed and would be interested to go. Discusses likely opinion of Lord Melville. About to go to Brighton again: Lady Franklin hopes to benefit from the German waters there. Distressed at accounts of...

21 Jul 1830

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/57

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, after his appointment to H.M.S. Rainbow

Did not have address needed to tell Richardson of appointment to H.M.S. Rainbow. Cannot act on Richardson’s suggestion of McAdam. Admiralty would not sanction Mr Arnott going on so small a ship. Derides the lack of interest in natural history of Mr Craig and assistant McConchy. Asks Richardson to suggest books about natural history and collection of specimens suitable for the ship’s officers. Much has altered since he was last involved in ship work and needs to make up lost ground. Gives positive opinion of officers but first lieutenant has been admitted to hospital. Not able to take leave...

14 Sep 1830

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/58

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on start of his journey on H.M.S. Rainbow to teh Mediterranean

Pleased to have met Captain Phillips, appointed to Ariadne. Pleased with Rainbow: the ship, its officers and men. Describes passage from Portsmouth. Reports improvement in health of niece Mary under the care of Richardson and his wife. Describes observations of Plymouth and district and preparations for sailing. Mr Craig, surgeon, is comfortable; Mr Cunningham has joined the Jayne. Asks Richardson’s opinion about political changes: pleased at Lord Goderich being at the Colonial Branch given his support for expeditions in these days of “rigid economy”. Beechey’s book published. Dismissive of...

26 Nov 1830

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/59

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in Greece

Describes positive observations of Gibraltar and Malta and activities during three week stay in Malta. Describes places of interest around Napoli. Reflects on limited personal knowledge of classical Greece and describes visits to historical sites. Bemoans the rapacity of Elgin and others, stripping works of art for vanity: doomed to be neglected in the cellars of the British Museum. Regrets destruction of the city of Athens. Was senior officer at Napoli but Captain Lyon now arrived. Details his expected moves to Malta and Corfu. Describes bringing a new ship to order: requires a knowledge...

10 Mar 1831

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/60

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in Greece

Grateful for Richardson’s account of Lander’s successful expedition: asks for news of various societies. Describes his cabin. Reports progress of youngsters studying on board. Henry Kay is to join. Has received gold medal of Geographical Society of Paris: Barrow had predicted it would never be received. Refers to Barrow’s decision about search for Captain Ross. Pleased that Lander is to undertake a further expedition; Hoppner not to be in charge as Lander unwilling to be second in charge. Lady Franklin met Lander on London to Falmouth steam packet. Describes travels in Europe of Lady...

24 Sep 1831

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/61

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in Greece

Has received Richardson’s gift: a volume about birds. Has pressed for publication of volume about insects prepared by Mr Kirby. Beechey keen to complete survey of NW coast of America. Doubts whether Back would be willing to join such a survey: asks about Back. Young Kay has joined. Aware of Government satisfaction with Kendall’s work in New Brunswick. Kendall is to publish an account of the Chanticleer voyage. Has had details of the voyage from young Kay, including mention of Foster’s violent temper. Herschel will see knighthood as poor compensation for loss of chair. Has no knowledge of...

30 Dec 1831

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/62

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in the Mediterranean

Expresses sympathy at death of Richardson’s wife, which he had heard from Beaufort; recalls her kindness to himself and his child. Is at Brindisi to convey Sir F. Adam, Lord High Commissioner, to Corfu. Will rejoin Lady Franklin at Corfu. Gives news from a letter from Back and conveys good wishes from Henry Kay. Explains Lady Franklin’s intended summer travels, the giving of his consent and requirements to protect against fever. Expects to go to Malta for ship re-fit. Sir W Burnet has gone from Zante to Greece: expects to see him at Corfu.

Postscript 28 Mar 1832: at Corfu received a deeply...

24 Feb 1832

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/63

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in Greece

Pleased at marriage of Kendall and Mary Anne|: draws contrast with his negative view of her earlier possible marriage. Distressed at news of Hepburn: pointless to write to Admiral Dundas and to Barrow. Has asked Barrow about promotion for Kendall and will write to Sir Pulteney Malcolm if he gets appointed to the Navy Board. Relates knowledge of recent political events in UK, including passage of The Reform Act. Welcomes Richardson’s attempts to generate sympathy for Ross. Reports death of Spinks at Gibraltar, creation of a memorial tablet and sale of his effects. Describes recent military...

17 Jun 1832

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/64

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in Greece

Expresses both regret and relief at Government refusal for Richardson to go in search of Ross: feared that Richardson would not have been up to the task. Has heard from Beaufort of Back’s offer to search for Ross: dismissive of Back’s competence. Discusses Kendall’s prospects, letters from Kendall and his wife, and expresses pleasure at their marriage. Regards Mary Ann as having been released from “domestic tyranny”: Emily was favourite; William is talented; commends Henry. Describes his actions and political insecurity at Patras: guarding against encroachments by wily Greeks usurping the...

1 Aug 1832

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/65

Letter [incomplete: final sheet only] from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in Greece

[mid-sentence] reference to Russian colleague celebrating anniversary of the Russian Emperor’s coronation having mentioned the anniversary to neither British nor French fellow captains. Indicates being constantly on guard against large-scale Russian intrigue. Has not heard from Jane [Lady Franklin] for six weeks: believes her to be at Smyrna: hopes to see her soon in Malta. Gets good news of his child: praises his sister’s tuition. Asks Richardson to send news if he should see her. Kendall not yet obtained a fixed salary: hopes they have sailed by now. Mary Ann will be delighted at your...

28 Sep 1832

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/66

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in the Mediterranean

Acknowledges news of Richardson’s marriage preparation, commends his taking of life insurance and expresses pleasure at the linking of their two families. Jane [wife] has arrived at Patras: lists her recent travels and likely future travels. Move to Malta depends on arrival of Bavarian Regency. Yet to see reports of speeches at meeting about Arctic land expedition. Assumes Richardson’s plan will be followed by Back. Has arranged to subscribe through his agents. Has written to Back: offering assistance and inviting him to visit [HMS] Rainbow. Regards Back as an odd compound of pride...

8 Dec 1832

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/67

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving on military duty in the Mediterranean

Regret at news of Richardson and family having influenza. Sister Betsy enjoyed visit to Chatham. The Rainbow ready for sea after refit: to sail to Dardanelles. Wife has left with friends Mrs Hanson and Miss Herring: lists their travel plans. Has agreed to wife accompanying consul at Alexandria to the Upper Nile. Wife’s health improved. Speculates about future employment, possibly on the Volage, now being fitted at Portsmouth. Has spoken to Sir P. Malcolm and Sir Thomas Hardy; will receive a testimonial from Sir Henry Hotham; and the “late lamented Commander in Chief” had written to the...

21 Jun 1833

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/68

Letter from John Franklin to his niece, Mary, wife of his friend John Richardson, on his arrival back in England

Safe arrival today: yet to receive orders. Will visit after going to Admiralty and seeing Eleanor: alludes to meeting the Richardsons’ child. Not seen Jane [wife] since August nor had a letter since October. Asks Mary to write immediately: has had no family news since August.

19 Dec 1833

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/69

Letter from John Franklin to his niece, Mary, wife of his friend John Richardson, on assorted family news

Has neglected to write for some time. Had had news of Mary from her mother and from Mary Anne: refers to preparation of Fishes for the press. Has seen brother James: his regular doctor is getting help from Sir Richard Dobson: describes removal of bandages from leg: pleased at improvement. Pleased with Mary Anne: well suited to Tom and sharing parish duties. Comments on Dr Pacey’s likely opinion of the marriage. Envisages less good prospects for Sophy and Isabell: will visit them this week to discuss a move to somewhere cheaper than Tunbridge Wells. Good that Marian Cracroft is with them...

5 May 1834

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/70

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including reference to Back's Arctic expedition, his brother James Franklin and his wife still being in Cairo

Considers letters from Back at Fort Reliance about geographical observations. McConochie published in The Times today. Refers to relative positions of Back and Hearne. Writes at length about his brother James Franklin, very ill at Greenwich: refers to symptoms, medicine prescribed, doctors consulted: asks Richardson for recommendations. Has had no discussion with James about his will. Discusses where his sister Bella may live: expense of current arrangement cannot be sustained. Reference to Jane Franklin being in Cairo.

Letter only dated 19 June, but the year 1824 has been added in pencil...

19 Jun [1834]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/71

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, with inserted note on natural history pubication

Reports at length about James’s [brother] health following opinion of Sir R Dobson: mentions brother’s wishes about publication of his poems, Persian translations and geological texts. Refers to brother’s theological meditations, heard also by Mr Ainger. Margaret fatigued. Has consented to Mrs Cracroft’s wish for Guernsey. Captain Brackenbury(?) gives an excellent account.

Sheet inserted in this letter: no date nor author: text in the form of a proposal for appointment of a committee at the next Association meeting toward publishing a Natural History catalogue.

1 Aug 1834

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/72

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on printing of Richardsons' book on fish and assorted family news

Has approached Mr Hay about Government grant toward cost of printing Richardson’s book about fish. Hopes Mary and the boy are well. Gives news of the health and activities of wife (improved by her stay in Essex) and of sister Betsy (far from good, but not in immediate danger); he and his wife will be going to Hastings in a few days.

[letter bears no year nor postmark: news about his wife indicates 1835]

27 Feb [1835]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/73

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on meeting Sir John Ross

Has just seen Mr Hay: Franklin's letter and Richartdson's enclosure had been forwarded to the Treasury with recommendation that money should be granted. Has seen Sir John Ross twice after Richardson left: he never mentioned the review, spoke of publishing an appendix next September; Franklin asks what Richardson makes of Ross’s indifference to the review; Franklin thinks Ross looks pale and has no doubt he is anxious.

[Dated only Tuesday afternoon: context suggests 1835]

[1835]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/74

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, including on publication of book by Sir John Ross on his Arctic expedition (1829-1833)

Sends congratulations of birth of Richardson’s second son. Heard from Wrangle, then from Mr & Mrs Duggin, seen at Leamington Spa. Wife has been under Jephson: some improvement but no miraculous cure. Reports proposed route for return to London. Comments on Ross’s work, now published: James Ross hurt at how he is mentioned. Parry has written to Barrow and Franklin for advice in relation to insinuations against him. Points out discrepancies in Ross’s charts and text. Disgusted that Ross gives Richardson no credit for his part in promoting the current expedition. Asks for Richardson’s opinion...

15 May 1835

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/75

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on assorted family news, including loss of Richardson's infant

Refers to loss of Richardson’s infant. Reports observations of and discussions with family members in Lincolnshire: sister, Tom and Mr Booth. Hopes to visit Richardson before going to Guernsey. Refers to forthcoming “Drawing Room” - wife obliged to attend. Refers to Mary receiving the Sellwoods. Will see them on return to London: offers to meet at coach office and escort to Aunt Margaret’s. Boy at Friskney trying to chatter. Hopes to visit Sheerness: asks about steamers from Chatham.

19 Jun 1835

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/76

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, before his journey to Van Diemen's Land

Met Mr Marshall, ship agent: Dr Stevens, surgeon, may go: to be landed at Van Diemen’s Land, so Dr Stevens may not accept. Asks Richardson to contact Dr Stevens. Ship will sail in late July. Asks Richardson for news of Garry. Saw Mrs Opie who wanted to speak about a convict: she spoke warmly of Richardson. Has postponed Lincolnshire visit in order to meet Parry. Back seems in justified high spirits. Has repeated Richardson’s advice to let Sir James Gordon do all about the ship: would like to see the ship before he leaves Chatham. Barrow taking chair for Geographical Society anniversary...

16 May 1836

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/77

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Richardson’s letters doubly valuable: the only scientific and literary notices received. Has no time to read periodicals. Will try to get fish collected. Mentions Mr Elliot, collector of birds and animals. Reports at length his unease with aspects of Maconochie’s activities and views, with particular reference to Maconochie’s papers about prison discipline. Finds Mrs Maconochie unfriendly: takes care to be civil to her. Describes Lady Franklin’s disposition toward Mrs Maconochie. Reports his first meeting of the Legislative Council. Will send related document to Beaufort and asks Richardson...

18 Sep 1837

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/78

Letter from John Franklin to friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Report grief at death of Henry Booth, a childhood companion. Asks Richardson to undertake some tasks in relation to his will and documents about Devonshire Street house. Reports better cooperation with Maconochie, who has applied for governorship of Port Phillip: he will benefit from lesson learned here of the value of extreme caution. Has made annual tour of inspection. Reports settlers’ anxiety at recent economic trends: proprietor of Colonial Press obliged to sell and retire. Has sent some fish and has more to send.

24 Feb 1838

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/79

Letter (incomplete, first page only) from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Sends another cask of fish, with Mr Evans, returning to England with Mrs Evans and Emma: explains end of Evans’ placement as magistrate at New Norfolk. Mrs Evans should be near her parents although they’ve treated her unkindly. Trusts that Mrs Mackintosh will look after her. A prospect soon of an addition to their family. Has asked a specimen collector, stationed on the south of the island, to collect fish for Richardson. Condemns the “vile” press for generating a constant state of excitement in the people. Wife unwell for three weeks: attributes this to recent unusual weather and lists her...

28 Mar 1838

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/80

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Pleased at news of Royal Society deputation to Lord Melbourne about commissioning an expedition to the southern hemisphere. James Ross the most qualified for such an expedition. Unable to study magnetism here: too busy with colonial government Commends Mr Lempiere’s tidal and meteorological data and seeks to engage an officer in magnetic observations for Sabine. Commends activities of Mr & Mrs Gould: their son born at Government House. Hopes to find some employment for Dr Hobson, zoologist: now travelling in Australia with Lady Franklin. Drought in New South Wales means dependency on Van...

23 May 1839

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/81

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Mentions visits from Dr Frome, brother of their mutual friend, and Mr D’Urville and Captain Jaquinot. D’Urville doubts whether Weddell reached as far south as he claims. D’Urville now sailed: likely to get near the south pole ahead of Ross. American squadron have been at Sydney: secretive about there journey and their intentions. Had news from Beaufort about Ross’s progress. Preparation of an observatory now in hand. Instructions from Royal Society are methodical and observations will be valuable. Wishes that Richardson’s wish to be in the expedition had been granted. Compliments Elliot and...

17 Feb 1840

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/82

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Sending three native tiger specimens: under care of Dr J. Wingate Johnston, addressed to Professor Owen: has asked for one to be available for Richardson’s museum at Haslar. Mr Power travelling in the same ship will be able to give information about the tiger’s food habits. Mr Lempiere has collected more fish for Richardson. Reports departure of Ross and Crozier: optimistic about their expedition in contrast to Balleny, D’Urville and American squadron. Reports magnetic observations and related conversation with Sabine about correspondence in Philosophical journal. Reports on commercial and...

5 Dec 1840

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/83

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Another barrel of fish collected by Lempiere being taken to England by Frederick Bell: a landed proprietor who has erected baths. Describes actions taken and justifications relating to Gregory; dismissing Captain Boyd as surveyor general; dealing with Anstey, commissioner of insolvency court; dismissing Herbert G Jones as solicitor general. Informs Richardson lest the matters should be reported in English newspapers. Lady Franklin going to New Zealand in a warship: Miss Williamson, Eleanor’s governess, going with her. Eleanor went to South Australia with Lady Franklin, but will now remain...

22 Feb 1841

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/84

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Reports satisfactory information about Ross’s progress: gives details about voyage south and return to Van Diemen’s Land. Lady Franklin is in New Zealand: expected back in May. All family are well and Mrs Price has had another fine baby. Relays regards to Richardson from Ross.

13 Apr 1841

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/85

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while serving as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land, including on his potential dismissal by Lord Stanley

Reports arrival of Mr Bicheno: recognised as a former acquaintance. Expresses views and opinions about matters to do with the Montagu decision [to dismiss Montagu] and with public speculation about who might be appointed to succeed Franklin as governor. Claims hostility toward him at the Colonial Office. Claims feelings of indignation in the colony about his treatment. Refers to seeking advice about his response to Lord Stanley: has had contact with Sir George Gipps

Postscript 20 Apr 1843: reports having heard news that earlier Lord Stanley had intended to recall him. Has received...

19 Apr 1843

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/86

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while on his return from Van Diemen's Land to England

Has sent an edition of Tasmanian Journal. Writes at length about the existing Tasmanian Society, founded and largely funded by himself. Describes scathingly proposals and actions in relation to a replacement organisation, including the contribution of Sir Eardley Wilmot. Asks for Richardson’s opinion and indicates that Lord Stanley should be informed. Recalls that an earlier proposal for appointment of a naturalist for the colony had been refused and predicts that the holder of a newly established similar post will face difficulties. Wishes that an arboretum should be established in a...

22 Nov 1843

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/87

Letter (incomplete, first sheet only) from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on his interviews with members of the Government, attempting to recover his reputation following his recall as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Describes interviews with Lord Minto and then Lord Glenelg: reports their opinions [in relation to Franklin’s removal from the post of Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen’s Land by Lord Stanley].

29 Jul 1844

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/88

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on his attempts to recover his reputation following his recall as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Sends copy of letter to Lord Stanley. Has left out a threat of publishing; the threat is implicit in the letter’s style Refers to advice from Beaufort and Brown. Encloses an earlier letter from Lord Stanley. Refers to comment by Simpkinson about correspondence with Lord Stanley. Asks Richardson’s opinion about how to reply to Lord Stanley. Forwards Colonial Gazette with information about Van Diemen’s Land Colonial Office. Heard from Mary Anne Kay that Mary not well: sends love to her and the young ones.

[Letter bears no year or postmark: content indicates 1844]

2 Sep 1844

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/89

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, on his attempts to recover his reputation following his recall as Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land

Forwards a letter from Sabine. Asks Richardson’s opinion about memorandum relating to Montagu. Believes it is better for him not to have it in his possession. Believes there are documents in Lord Stanley’s office which have been obtained through “treachery” of Montagu and Forster. Documents shown to others as proof of Lady Franklin’s “interference”: believes no-one has the right to hold him to account for any assistance he may choose to get. Letters and papers brought by Dr Jones on the Kinnear describe “lamentable” state of Van Diemen’s Land. Refers to possible new trial in the case of...

5 Oct [1844]

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/90

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, while preparing for his final expedition

Offers congratulations on the birth of a child. Will not have room for a naturalist. Commends what Richardson is doing for poor Mary Anne [Kendall, whose husband Edward Kendall had died 10 days earlier]. Mr Paine, too, is indefatigable.

22 Feb 1845

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/91

Letter from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson, written from Greenland during Franklin's final Arctic expedition

Gives details of journey to Greenland. Doubts whether ships will be able to take all supplies without being too deep in the water. He and Crozier intend to carry as many provisions and as much fuel as possible. Refers to observations (magnetic instruments, latitude, longitude, survey angles). Mr Goodsir assiduous in dredging for and drawing crustaceans. Describes various specimens obtained. Other expedition men (including Stanley) happy to collect specimens. Describes location: an esquimaux fishing station. Describes esquimaux, including reading and arithmetical abilities: children taught...

7 Jul 1845

D8760/F/FJR/1/1/92

Original album from which were extracted the letters from John Franklin to his friend John Richardson and other documents

Labelled on spine "Sir John Franklin + Letters 1820-1845": on front cover is a label in hand of Aileen Pauline Gell "Dr Richardson R.N. from Sir John Franklin - 1820-1845 - 98 letters Franklin to Richardson"

The album held 89 letters from Franklin to Richardson, 1820-1845 (now D8760/F/FJR/1/1/1-91 passim), 2 letters from Franklin to his niece and Richardson's wife, Mary, 1833-1834 (now D8760/F/FJR/1/1/68-69), copy of letter by Franklin to John Barrow, 26 Nov 1823 (now D8760/F/FJR/1/1/12/a), list of provisions for expediiton, 1824 (now D8760/F/FJR/1/1/23/a), as well as a letter from Thomas...

[late 19th cent]

D8760/F/FJR/1/2

Letters to John Richardson from other correspondents

 

1825-1850

D8760/F/FJR/1/2/1

Letter from Thomas Drummond to John Richardson, relating to state of botanical specimens collected by Richardson during Arctic land expedition

Arrived last night. Reports condition of botanical specimens: some lost through rain during the journey. Remarks on some particular finds including plant, beetle and shell specimens. Will try to visit high ground visible from this location: tired of swamps ad mosquitoes. Names some specimens yet to be obtained. Lists particular items, plants and birds, for future attention. Asks Richardson to convey to Franklin his appreciation of the trouble taken by Franklin to make Drummond comfortable.

Note: the address page contains, in a different hand, a list of 9 surnames and numbered categories...

28 Jun 1825

D8760/F/FJR/1/2/2

Letter from Edward Twopenny to John Richardson, recommending Stuart, the natural son of Sir Charles Cunningham, to Sir John Franklin

Mrs Richardson had told him that she thought he would have no objections to writing to Sir John Franklin on behalf of a deserving young man, the natural son of Sir Charles Cunningham, Stuart by name aged about 21 or 22; his mother is not known, but she married an army officer sicne her misconduct; he was educated at Merchant Taylors School and wanted to join the army; Sir Chares endeavoured to procure a commission in the marines, but failed; he was, therefore, sent to seek his fortune in New South Wales, and only after Sir Charles's death did he get to know the name of his father; an old...

13 May 1836

D8760/F/FJR/1/2/3

Letter from Thomas Huxley to Sir John Richardson, on being able to see SIr John's drawings and notes

On his being paid off at Chatham instead of Portsmouth, meaning Sir John will not be able to show him the zoological notes and drawings (over 100 sheets), followed by a few notes of observations on animals

31 Oct 1850

D8760/F/FJR/1/2/4

Letter from Thomas Huxley to Sir John Richardson, relating to grant to finance writing of book

Informing him of his dealings with Mr Burnet and Sir Francis Beaufort and the Lord Commissioners in trying to obtain grant money [to write up book], it being more likely he would get it through the Royal Society, and also of his attempts to be appointed with the Admiralty, with Professor Owen volunteering to write to the First Lord

17 Nov 1850

D8760/F/FJR/1/2/5

Letter from Henry Denny to Sir John Richardson, relating to the getting of information about Arctic fauna

This being indebted to him for his exertions on his behalf and also to Mr Rae through Richardson's influence, listing lice from migratory birds, nearly all of which are known to him, and asking whether he could induce some of the traders in the fur countries could get lice from quadropeds such as beaver, bear, Arctic fox, etc

5 Nov 1850

D8760/F/FJR/1/3

Copies and extracts from letters and documents of SIr John Richardson

 

1825-1849

D8760/F/FJR/1/3/1

Manuscript copy of extract of report by John Richardson to N.Garry, during John Franklin's second Arctic land expedition

Anticipates that Garry will have received information from their mutual friend Franklin.  Franklin and Kendall have returned.  Describes the current building and limited set of musical instruments in use.  Lists the number of different accents and voices amongst these present. Envisages future development of this land, ploughed by Watt's and Boulton's engines.  Refers to presence of coal and iron. Describes lake survey, and local fauna and flora.  Observes that Franklin has regained serenity, though still sad at times, following the death of his wife.

[6 Sep 1825]

D8760/F/FJR/1/3/2

Typescript copy of letter 25 Nov 1840 from Peter W. Dease to Dr John Richardson on the cultivation of crops in northern Canada

Written from 28 Arundel Street, Strand; recipient identified from contribution by John Richardson to The New Edinburgh Philisophical Journal, Volume 30, 1841, entitled "On the Cultivation of the Cerealia in the High Latitudes of North America", pages 123-124, which contains an amended version of most of the typescript letter.

[20th cent]

D8760/F/FJR/1/3/3

Written extract on The Franklin Expedition from "The Montreal Minerva" of 20 Feb 1848, comprising copy of letter from Rev. Father Tache, a Canadian missionary

Nothing new in the area apart from an expedition to search fo Sir John Franklin; expedition wintering at Fort Cumberland with Mr. G. Descambault; Sir John Richardson to leave with a canoe before midsummer; Tache thinks expedition perfectly useless; either Sir John has made way back to England or he has perished in the ice, and expedition unable to reach Arctic ice before midsummer 1849; firing of cannon was heard on Mackenzie's River, probably signals of distress, but impossible to go to their assistance; Dr Hay is also in search, but no news of him either, his rashness at sea being well...

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FJR/1/3/4

Extracts transcribed from letter dated 16 Sep 1848 by Sir John Richardson on his search expedition

Written from Fort Confidence [North West Territories, Canada]

[Transcribed by Eleanor Franklin]

[mid 19th cent]

D8760/F/FJR/1/3/5

Written copy of "Notice of the Expeditions of Discovery and Search now in the Arctic Seas"

Recording summary of information on Franklin's expedition of 1845, and the three search expeditions sent out in 1848; a ship, the Plover, under the command of Captain Moore, travelling from the east via Behring Straits; a boat under Sir John Richardson, exploring coast between Mackenzie and Coppermine rivers; and two ships, the Enterpise and Investigator, under Sir James Ross and Captain Bird, via Lancaster Sound; the North Star storeship is to be dispatched to Davis Straits to communicate with Sir James Ross. Postcript added that Sir James had returned since note was written.

Apr 1849

D8760/F/FJR/1/3/6

Written notes on the Arctic route and plans for the expeditions involving Richardson, Ross and Rae (1848-1849)

Written on paper watermarked 1839

[c1849]

D8760/F/FJR/2

Printed material of John Richardson, colleague, friend and later relative of John Franklin

 

1859-1861

D8760/F/FJR/2/1

Offprint of Polar Regions by John Richardson from the Encyclopaedia Britannica Vol. XVIII.

Copy belonging to E.I. Gell, signed by John Richardson

[c1859]

D8760/F/FJR/2/2

Reprint of "Life of Sir John Franklin" by Sir John Richardson, from the Encyclopaedia Britannica, Eighth Edition

Published by Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh; 16 pages; Personal copy of John Philip Gell.

[c1860]

D8760/F/FJR/2/3

Pages 5-12 from reprint of "Life of Sir John Franklin" by Sir John Richardson, from the Encyclopaedia Britannica, Eighth Edition

Published by Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh; 8 pages.

[c1860]

D8760/F/FJR/2/4

The Polar Regions, by Sir John Richardson

Published by Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh.

400 pages, plus 9 pages of title page, preface and pages of contents.

Sent by the author, inscribed Rev J.P. Gell.

Bookplate of Philip Lyttelton Gell on front endpaper.

1861

D8760/F/FKA

Records of the Kay family, related to Sir John Franklin by his marriage to his first wife, Eleanor

The records consist mostly of letters written to the Kays, including letters by John Franklin, his first wife Eleanor Anne, her father William Porden, and Franklin's second wife Lady Jane Franklin.

1797-1860

D8760/F/FKA/1

Letters of Sarah Henrietta Kay, daughter of William Porden and sister-in-law of John Franklin

Sarah Henrietta (Henny) Kay, nee Porden (1785-1859) was the daughter of architect William Porden and Mary his wife, and the sister of Eleanor Anne, the first wife of Sir John Franklin. On 5 March 1807 at the church of St Giles in the Fields, Holborn, she married the architect Joseph Kay, her father's assistant at the time. They had at least 8 children, comprising 2 boys (William Porden Kay and Joseph Henry Kay) and 6 girls (Mary Anne, Henrietta Emilia Anna, Ellen Lydia, Eliza Margaret, Sarah Frances and Eleanor Franklin).

1797-1860

D8760/F/FKA/1/1

Letters from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay

The letters were written from just prior to the death of Franklin's first wife, Eleanor Anne, on 22 Feb 1825 to his time on tour of duty in the Meditrerranean in 1833. Sarah Henrietta Kay nursed Eleanor during her final illness, together with Franklin's sister, Hannah Booth and her daughter Mary Booth. Franklin does not seem to have particularly liked his sister-in-law, whom he thought a meddling gossip.

1825-1833

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/1

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, just before his departure on his second Arctic land expedition, referring to the illness of his first wife

Refers to her wish to give him something useful for the expedition: needs a "Ditty Bag", containing sewing materials.  Proposes to visit her on 3 Feb: will also call on friends in Greenwich and at the observatory.  Describes his wife's anxiety at the propect of his departure:  views this nervous excitement as the source of her current weakness.  She wants to see Mrs Kay's children.  Sister did not visit yesterday: detained at Stamford by Mary's illness.  Hopes she will visit soon as her sister [Franklin's wife] wants some female friendship.

26 Jan 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/2

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, just before his departure on his second Arctic land expedition, referring to the illness of his first wife

Eleanor feels much better this morning, stil in bed; he regrets his occupations oblige him to be so much from her; for the next three or four days she will want a companion, as he is employed writing his letters to people in Hudson's Bay for deposit of provisions to be made and dispatched to Canada on 4 March; they would both be obliged if Mary Anne were with Eleanor for a few days; he will call for her tomorrow on his return from Woolwich and take her by coach with him; inconvenient for him to write letters in the drawing room, as his papers have to be spread out.

[Feb 1825]

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/3

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on receipt of news of his first wife's death and the progress of hs second Arctic land expedition

Has received news of wife's death.  Reiterates having found hope in favourable change in her condiition a few days before his departure. Considers death in a religious context.  Asks for an account of his wife's last days and of his daughter's well-being.  Refers to the burden on Mrs Booth and Mrs Kay.  Assumes that Mr Kay will have set arangements in hand.  May not be able to despatch further letters before the Hudson's Bay [Company] ship reaches England in November.  Presumes Mrs Kay has opened his recent lettter addressed to his wife and now encloses the one written today so that Mrs Kay...

22 Apr 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/4

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

Writing on daughter's birthday: alludes to grief but appreciates that he is now free of anxiety about his daughter's care.  Describes journey from Fort William.  Men are fatigued with paddling and where necessary carrying canoes.  He and Richardson went ahead in order to prepare provisions at each post.  Reports timely arrival of stores in advance of the expedition.  Have reached location where pemmican is in general use.  Jokes that Mary Anne could eat pemmican or roast goose if she could "pop over".  Envisages next stage to Cumberland House.  No likelihood after that of being able send...

3-6 Jun 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/5

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

Arrived to find that boats had left fourteen days earlier for Athabasca lake.  A carpenter, Thomas Matthews has broken his leg: Richardson predicts a good recovery.  Offers advice not to trust newspaper reports about the expediiton.  About to resume the journey: reports calm after stormy weather and many mosquitoes.

16 Jun 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/6

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

23 Jul: Describes laborious journey: canoes and cargo needed to be carried overland.  Men fatigued but have recovered and have set off again. Wants Mary Anne to know that her ornaments have survived and have been admired.  Reports assistance received from Indians and that a substantial quantity of stores have been received.  Arrived here a month earlier than expected.  Reflects on the four months he spent at ths location during an earlier voyage.  Describes his observations of the women and children at the fort, which remind him of his daughter.  Daily work and prayer have enabled him to...

23-25 Jul 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/7

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

Have achieved every thing intended. He and Kendall have been to the sea and obtained information for next summer's expedition. Met no Eskimaux but left gifts in their huts. Well received by their neighbours the Quarrellers of Mackenzie River. Describes arrival and observations made at an island, given the name Garry. Describes feelings at flying the flag made by his late wife. Lists animals and birds seen. Refers to Dr Richardson and Mr Back. Describes work of carpenters at winter quarters. Has allowed the name Franklin, given to this establishment by officers, to stand. Has read her...

7 Sep 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/8

Manuscript copy of letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

Have achieved every thing intended. He and Kendall have been to the sea and obtained information for next summer's expedition. Met no Eskimaux but left gifts in their huts. Well received by Quarrellers. Describes arrival and observations made at an island, given the name Garry. Describes feelings at flying the flag made by his late wife. Lists animals and birds seen. Refers to Dr Richardson and Mr Back. Describes work of carpenters at winter quarters. Has allowed the name Franklin, given to this establishment by officers, to stand. Has read her most recent letters again (put aside...

7 Sep 1825

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/9

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

Reports receipt of letters, despite their needing to have been recovered after an Indian made off with the packet.  Approves of arrangements made in relation to the Devonshire Street house: regards Lady Thomas as a suitable tenant.  Pleased that late wife's pictures have been moved to the Kay's house.  Visualises his late wife every day and reflects on bereavement within a religious perspective.  Asks for servants to be given a memento.  Gratified at news of his daughter.  Pleased that Baker will continue.  Expresses hopes for well being of Mrs Cracroft and for Eleanor and her cousin...

6 Feb 1826

D8760/F/FKA/1/1/10

Letter from John Franklin to his sister-in-law Sarah Henrietta Kay, on the progress of his second Arctic land expedition

12 Jun: Explains being unexpectedly able to send a further letter.  Reports favourable prospects for next stage of the expedition: writes of Almighty providence.  Reports comfortable and satisfying stay at Fort Franklin.  Refers to thoughts of friends and family, especially his daughter on her birthday, which was marked with a toast to her health.  Describes routines of fur trading.  Envisages possible route for the return journey and describes implications for his receipt of further letters.  Speculates about re-engaging servants upon return to London.  Sends good wishes to family and...

12 Jun 1826-1 Jul 1826

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